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Old 09-02-2014, 01:17 PM   #1
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Simplifying My Camera Junk

So I getting tired of lugging around my camera gear. I'm not shooting as much as I used to and I'm thinking at getting rid of it all and getting something like a high end point and shoot. I like the ability to control my camera and also like the ability to shoot RAW. I haven't been keeping up much with whats out there lately. I would be replacing a 5DII, 5D, 24-105, 14-70, 50, 85, and 100mm macro and a 580 flash.

Is there anything out there that would give me the creativity that I have with the above equipment in a small package for a price that would compare to what I would sell my stuff for?
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Old 09-02-2014, 01:29 PM   #2
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If you want the ability to still change lenses, but have a smaller kit, mirrorless is the way to go.

Fuji's XT1 is capable of some awesome images. Search Flickr Groups for XT1 and you'll see what I mean.

Sony has a full frame mirrorless system now with the A7 series. The lenses are pricey and somewhat limited at this time though.

For a point and shoot the Sony RX100 III seems to be leading the way. Tiny but with a large sensor. $800 though.

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Old 09-02-2014, 01:33 PM   #3
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Fuck. I meant to put this in shiny things.

I was just reading up on the Fuji stuff. Looks pretty interesting.
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Old 09-02-2014, 01:41 PM   #4
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The Fuji stuff is nice, and if you have film roots, all the controls are in the right places. Panasonic, with its Lumix line is great as well. Mirrorless is the way to go for compact.


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Old 09-02-2014, 01:42 PM   #5
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I keep coming back to the Fuji stuff. There is something sweet about the X-Trans sensor. The colors just look so natural and correct. Other cameras may have higher resolution, the Sony for instance with it's 36 megapixels, but I don't think the Sony's images "look" better than the Fuji's. And that's kinda the point.

Fuji also has a nice lens line. There are no stinkers. Their 18-55 "kit" lens is capable of decidedly non kit images.
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Old 09-02-2014, 01:48 PM   #6
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I keep coming back to the Fuji stuff. There is something sweet about the X-Trans sensor. The colors just look so natural and correct. Other cameras may have higher resolution, the Sony for instance with it's 36 megapixels, but I don't think the Sony's images "look" better than the Fuji's. And that's kinda the point.

Fuji also has a nice lens line. There are no stinkers. Their 18-55 "kit" lens is capable of decidedly non kit images.
Fuji knows their colors, I have their S5 Pro and still shoot with it on occasion and it produces great images in some ways better than my D700/D7100.

If you're going mirrorless and want the best quality I'd say Fuji, though Olympus is no slouch and they have a smaller form factor along with great optics and colors.
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Old 09-02-2014, 02:20 PM   #7
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Olympus. Omd series for mini-slr experience, pen series for more point and shoot-like, but they use the same lenses, which are excellent. Micro 4/3, the format/sensor size, lenses interchange among panasonic, oly, and some aftermarket. I dumped all my FX and DX stuff and just went for mirrorless.you can get down to point and shoot size and have most of the quality you are used to with fx and xd. Most gear heads get carried away with pixel count. 16 MPx is plenty, I've done billboards with 5.

If you are a nikon fanboy, don't care as much about image quality and value blazing speed, the overpriced nkon 1 stuff is super fast and the slightly older models can be had at deep discounts, but the quality, lens selection (despite the ft1adapter) just isn't as good. The ft1 is an overpriced adapter that let's some legacy nikon lenses work with the smaller nikon 1 stuff in a limited fashion. If you have lots of legacy dx and fx lenses it makes them useful. Otherwise, it's a limited system. The Fuji and Sony also don't have the depth of lens selection that olympus and panasonic have.

One downside, the olympus menu system was clearly designed by engineers. You can do a lot of customizing, but it takes a bit of study. Panasonic menus are easie to follow.

Oly uses in body image stabilization, so it works with any lens. Panasonic stabilizes the lens, like nikon's vr. Both are excellent.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:11 PM   #8
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There are a lot of quality cameras to choose from and all have pros and cons.

I got tired of lugging my full frame Canon years ago and just stopped using it. I had several point-and-shoots for a few years, but got frustrated with the image quality and limited flexibility. I bought an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and three lenses earlier this year and couldn't be more pleased, both with the form factor and the quality. A pleasure to use.

FYI- This forum cover both Panasonic and Olympus m43: http://www.mu-43.com/forum.php

But it's really up to you and your preferences. All the brands have their fans. Happy shopping.
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Old 09-02-2014, 03:12 PM   #9
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Old 09-02-2014, 04:01 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by samc View Post
Olympus. Omd series for mini-slr experience, pen series for more point and shoot-like, but they use the same lenses, which are excellent. Micro 4/3, the format/sensor size, lenses interchange among panasonic, oly, and some aftermarket. I dumped all my FX and DX stuff and just went for mirrorless.you can get down to point and shoot size and have most of the quality you are used to with fx and xd. Most gear heads get carried away with pixel count. 16 MPx is plenty, I've done billboards with 5.
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There are a lot of quality cameras to choose from and all have pros and cons.

I got tired of lugging my full frame Canon years ago and just stopped using it. I had several point-and-shoots for a few years, but got frustrated with the image quality and limited flexibility. I bought an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and three lenses earlier this year and couldn't be more pleased, both with the form factor and the quality. A pleasure to use.

FYI- This forum cover both Panasonic and Olympus m43: http://www.mu-43.com/forum.php

But it's really up to you and your preferences. All the brands have their fans. Happy shopping.


I wish I could join you guys, right now I do some shooting that still is much easier to do with DSLR's BUT I have a shoot I'm laying the gear out for right now and honestly I could get away with a PEN with a good standard zoom for the tripod mounted wide shot and an OM-D with the Panasonic 35-100, or the Oly 75 F1.8.

I can't comment much on the specifics of the current m4/3 cameras but I did shoot the 4/3 before them and Olympus did a lot of things right. They give you a lot of control, options that you need to buy the higher end Canon and Nikon bodies to get, and their color was amazing right out of the camera. Also their lenses were awesome, the E-620 with the 9-18 or 14-54 in front of it made some images.

If I was going mirrorless it would be a tough call between Olympus and Fuji.

Edit: One more thing about mirrorless is they come out with new cameras a lot more frequently than the traditional DSLR's and sometimes it'll be just a small upgrade so there are a lot of very competent mirrorless bodies out there 1-2 generations back that are only a year or so old and have very low prices.
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Old 09-02-2014, 04:01 PM   #11
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Smaller high quality cameras are all the rage right now.

First there are the premium large sensor point and shoots.

Any of the Fuji X100, Canon G1X II or the Sony RX100 II are great, compact (for their capability) and will give you DSLR quality in something that fits in a pocket.

Something new are large sensor bridge cameras, Sony's RX10 and Panasonic FZ1000. Again, large sensor but also good zoom. They are quite large, however.

Mirrorless are taking off. Fuji X series have the best sensors and aren't expensive but have a limited selection of lenses.

Micro 4/3 has a massive selection of excellent lenses, but the 4/3 sensor is smaller and they don't do as well in low light conditions.

Sony makes excellent cameras, but tend to force you into their upper ranges for some very basic features. Sony has a excellent range of lenses, and their adaptor lets you use Minolta/Sony A mount. An experienced photographer would find Sony to be 'odd.'

Samsung is trying to be a player, but is overpriced an again glass is rare.

One of the neatest ones is Canon's EOS M. It's a T4i (650D) in a mirrorless chassis with a unique mount. Pros are it was a market failure, so you can get them new for less than $200. Also, with an adaptor, they can use EF/EFS lenses (with a speed penalty on autofocus). Cons are that Canon seems to have given up on them, so I doubt any more native M mount lens are coming out. It's also impossible to get any kind of a viewfinder.
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Old 09-02-2014, 04:58 PM   #12
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I had the Olympus EM10. It's a great camera, and the pictures it took are fantastic. I ended up trading it for a D7000 only because most of my pictures are of my kids running around, and the mirrorless systems just aren't as quick with the autofocus so I was getting more blurry action shots than I was used to.

I still miss it sometimes. The landscape pictures that camera took turned out really well, and the smaller form factor meant that I was taking it more places than I would have with the full size dSLR.

Something to consider with the mirrorless cameras--some of them have an electronic viewfinder, some don't. I really think having a viewfinder is nice, especially on a sunny day. That being said, even the best electronic viewfinders that I looked at were a little bit of a let down compared to an optical viewfinder on an SLR. That may not bother you, but it cheapened the photography experience a little for me.

Another point to consider with the mirrorless is battery life. They claim 3-600 shots generally which is sufficient for most things. What I missed with the mirrorless vs the dslr is that with the slr I can charge a battery and it's good for a LONG time. As in, I don't charge for months. I can go out for a hike, turn the camera on and not turn it off until I get home and never have to worry about the battery. With the active display on the mirrorless battery life was nowhere near as good. They have settings to turn off the display and stuff after a certain amount of inactivity, but I still had multiple times where the camera had sat for a few days and when I went to get it the battery didn't have much juice left in it. I found that I was paranoid about battery life--something I've never even thought about with the slr. Again, this isn't a problem for most people and is easily solved with spare batteries, it's just something that wasn't even an issue with the slr.

Anyway, I highly recommend the mirrorless systems. I miss my olympus and would like to get another. I've also used the Sony Nex series and they work really well.
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Old 09-02-2014, 06:28 PM   #13
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Great info guys. Thanks and keep it coming.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:44 PM   #14
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A different take on simplifying..............

What if you took the camera you already had, and left a really awesome prime on it for a year. Maybe something between a 20mm and a 50mm in 35mm equivalent. Take out all the complexity of trying to choose the right lens for the subject and just shoot what you have. I wonder what you would come up with.

I say this because I've been thinking about doing this very thing while traveling. Throw a DSLR with a sweet prime in my tank bag and go.

This brings up the question of just what is the perfect focal length for travel? It would need to be a length you could capture landscapes, your bike, people, ............all the things you would encounter on a trip.

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Old 09-02-2014, 08:47 PM   #15
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A different take on simplifying..............

What if you took the camera you already had, and left a really awesome prime on it for a year. Maybe something between a 20mm and a 50mm in 35mm equivalent. Take out all the complexity of trying to choose the right lens for the subject and just shoot what you have. I wonder what you would come up with.

I say this because I've been thinking about doing this very thing while traveling. Throw a DSLR with a sweet prime in my tank bag and go.

This brings up the question of just what is the perfect focal length for travel? It would need to be a length you could capture landscapes, your bike, people, ............all the things you would encounter on a trip.

.
His cameras are BIG! Even with a prime that's a solid hunk and you need to store it. When I switch from my D700 (similar in size to the 5D) to the D7100 which still is by no means a small camera it's a very noticeable difference. If I wanted a camera I'd be more willing to travel with a mirrorless is the way to go. I feel his pain because I'm in the same boat, I don't bring my camera(s) a lot of the time due to the size and weight.
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