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Old 12-04-2012, 01:57 PM   #1
PhiSig1071 OP
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Found extra parts/pieces? (With Pics!)

Isn't it great how something as simple as an oil change can create so many problems? So I was doing an oil change on my fiancee's GS500F, and I noticed the rear sprocket was trashed. No worries, just get a new sprocket and chain. Well, I got all that in and started working. Got the old chain and sprocket off, got the new one broke down to the right length, and got the new sprocket on.

I went to feed the chain onto the countershaft sprocket and noticed it was a little loose. No problem, just pop the cover off and snug it up. Well, I opened up the cover and found this:



They were stuck in the accumulated road grime/chain lube crap under the sprocket, here:



At first I thought it might be a guide, like this one on the cover:



But there are way too many of them. Plus looking at the second picture, there's no need for them on the other bolts, plus according to ron ayers microfiche there is only one.

Any ideas? Chain exploded on the PO (My fiancee bought it with 2500 miles, it's got 30k now) and these are what's left? Any help is appreciated.
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:25 PM   #2
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It looks like it could be bits of a chain, but that's weird for one to come apart like that.... If there's no other signs of damage it about has to be from the trashed chain.



You didn't get a new countershaft sprocket?
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:32 PM   #3
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They do look like the chain rollers - inspect the old chain for missing ones should solve that question.
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:59 PM   #4
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After inspecting the old chain they are indeed the inner rollers.



No, I didn't do the countershaft sprocket. It's steel, the drive sprocket is aluminum, the countershaft sprocket is not showing significant wear.
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Old 12-04-2012, 03:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiSig1071 View Post
After inspecting the old chain they are indeed the inner rollers.

Yep. That's not entirely unusual for a very very worn chain. It was probably slipping/skipping too.

Quote:
No, I didn't do the countershaft sprocket. It's steel, the drive sprocket is aluminum, the countershaft sprocket is not showing significant wear.
The useful life of the replacement chain will be limited. I mean:
old sprockets + new chain < new sprockets + new chain
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Old 12-04-2012, 03:33 PM   #6
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Yep. That's not entirely unusual for a very very worn chain. It was probably slipping/skipping too.

The useful life of the replacement chain will be limited. I mean:
old sprockets + new chain < new sprockets + new chain
I agree, however, I have never really had an issue with it. I always change the rear, because they're aluminum, but I've only changed the front once, and that was just to go down one tooth on my '03 GSXR600. I have 30k miles on my GSXR, (including about 20 trackdays over the past five years) and I think I'm on my third chain. I don't know, maybe that is unusually short lifespan and I just don't know it. My fiancee's GS has about 30k on it as well and it's on it's fourth chain as of today (however, it's on it's second rear sprocket, and I do attribute the short life span on the third chain to the rear sprocket being pretty chewed up when she had the chain installed, I was out of town for a few months when she had it done). Hell, if it chews up this chain too quickly then it'll just give me an excuse to learn more about working on the bike.

Now, another question, I have always had this work done by a shop, but this time I decided to do it myself. I have a chain breaker/rivet tool, and I am using the rivet style master link. I followed the instructions for riveting the master link, but it doesn't seem like the rivet "flanged" out far enough. I did it by hand, and snugged it down slightly with a small wrench. What do you guys think?

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Old 12-04-2012, 03:35 PM   #7
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Just FYI I had not aligned the rear wheel yet, nor adjusted chain tension, thus the gap on the chain adjuster on the back of the axle.
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Old 12-04-2012, 03:51 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by PhiSig1071 View Post
I agree, however, I have never really had an issue with it. I always change the rear, because they're aluminum, but I've only changed the front once, and that was just to go down one tooth on my '03 GSXR600.
Do what works, but know steel still degrades, and a bad sprocket destroys a good chain. Just like everything else (helmets, oil, valve checks) ultimately it's up to you. Here's an example of a failed countersprocket:


Quote:
Now, another question, I have always had this work done by a shop, but this time I decided to do it myself. I have a chain breaker/rivet tool, and I am using the rivet style master link. I followed the instructions for riveting the master link, but it doesn't seem like the rivet "flanged" out far enough. I did it by hand, and snugged it down slightly with a small wrench. What do you guys think?
It looks okay. Gauge a proper riveting pressure based on the "width" of the links, not the spread of the rivet. In other words, make sure this link has the same amount of o-ring spacing as the other links- no more, no less.
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Old 12-04-2012, 03:57 PM   #9
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It looks okay. Gauge a proper riveting pressure based on the "width" of the links, not the spread of the rivet. In other words, make sure this link has the same amount of o-ring spacing as the other links- no more, no less.
Good to know! I hadn't thought about it that way, I just assumed the pins would flange out enough to be visible. I'll probably stash a clip-style master link in the tankbag anyway, just in case.

As for the front sprocket, I'll keep an eye on it, and the chain. It currently looks pretty good, it's in the second picture above. Thankfully the bike is no longer her primary mode of transport, and there will be more downtown for me to tinker with it and fix a few other little issues. Thanks for the heads up!
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:46 PM   #10
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Never saw that before.

Cheap ass chain? I tried a non-oring $35 chain in my big SV once and it barely made 1200 miles before it was all kinked up.

Damn, the new X ring chains are $135-$200 bucks nowadays.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:26 PM   #11
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Never saw that before.

Cheap ass chain? I tried a non-oring $35 chain in my big SV once and it barely made 1200 miles before it was all kinked up.

Damn, the new X ring chains are $135-$200 bucks nowadays.
EK X-Ring. Not cheap, not the best. It was her primary mode of transport for a 210 mile round-trip commute. In the desert. On the highway. We finally had to get her a car because small stuff kept coming up with the bike. I'm guessing that chain probably has around 5000 miles on it. So, ya know, barely a month's worth of commuting.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:36 PM   #12
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If I'm reading this correctly, 30,000 miles and it's on its fourth chain.... 7,500 miles per chain... I'd replace the front sprocket too. Chain comes in different tensile strengths, typically the bigger the engine the greater strength chain needed. If it's a decent chain properly installed and lubed once in a while it should last a lot longer than that. I'm at 20,000 miles on the original chain on my bike, and it's still got 5+K in it at least.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:36 PM   #13
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Cheap ass chain? I tried a non-oring $35 chain in my big SV once and it barely made 1200 miles before it was all kinked up.
Overtightened chains will do that.

As will chains that are simply worn out.

Once that starts happening, sprockets get tooth damage quickly.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:42 PM   #14
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+1 on the overtightening. The rear suspension wouldn't even budge if it were extrememly tight.

If that's a EK x-ring chain I'd email them and say WTF??

Tip: I'd remove the CS sprocket and grease the splines. Reduces wear and makes it easier to come off.
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Old 12-04-2012, 05:43 PM   #15
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Did you remove the front sprocket to clean the corrosion I see creeping on the splines behind the snap ring?
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