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Old 12-14-2012, 06:19 PM   #181
Barry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
HAHA




If you think your fast go race and prove it.
This ^^^^^
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:26 PM   #182
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Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
...
And of course, the chance of getting it wrong with both wheels in the rain is a decent amount higher...
... yet again!

The slicker the surface (or the slicker or less predictable it might be), the lighter you can safely brake. The lighter you are braking, the more weight remains on the rear wheel for longer and the more that wheel can contribute to overall braking. This is the real world folks. We are talking about a novice on an urban interstate - worn asphalt, polished concrete, oil, water, sand, tar snakes, painted lines, reflectors, potholes, etc., etc. - NOT a superbly experienced rider on a dry track. In the case we are supposedly discussing, both brakes will stop the lady quicker and safer than the front brake alone. End of story.
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:40 PM   #183
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Originally Posted by Bollocks View Post
Wow, I just read most of the posts and I am totally the opposite when it comes to breaking, lets put it this way...46k on my Tiger 1050 and I have gone through 1 set of breaks on the front and 6 on the rear.
.
[klay] **Braking** **Brakes** [klay]

You really should get some professional training.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:16 PM   #184
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Originally Posted by slartidbartfast View Post
... yet again!

The slicker the surface (or the slicker or less predictable it might be), the lighter you can safely brake. The lighter you are braking, the more weight remains on the rear wheel for longer and the more that wheel can contribute to overall braking. This is the real world folks. We are talking about a novice on an urban interstate - worn asphalt, polished concrete, oil, water, sand, tar snakes, painted lines, reflectors, potholes, etc., etc. - NOT a superbly experienced rider on a dry track. In the case we are supposedly discussing, both brakes will stop the lady quicker and safer than the front brake alone. End of story.
Quicker yes, but locking up both brakes at the same time, not sure that's safer.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:48 PM   #185
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
[klay] **Braking** **Brakes** [klay]

You really should get some professional training.
Not really, put the bike in the right gear pick the correct line and if I can't slow down enough with engine braking ill scrub of with a little back brake.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:50 PM   #186
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Not really, put the bike in the right gear pick the correct line and if I can't slow down enough with engine braking ill scrub of with a little back brake.
So you're not fast?
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:56 PM   #187
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Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
So you're not fast?

Nice try mate.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:57 PM   #188
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Nice try mate.

I guess I should have used a period.

So you're not fast.

There we go that works better.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:58 PM   #189
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Originally Posted by ParaMud View Post
I take losing control of one of your tires to be very serious.
So you expect the beginnner to lose control of the rear tire. So to do another move after emergency braking, you have to gear the rear tire under control. Before you can make an emergency swerve.

Getting a lock up tire to become unlocked, upsets the chasis of the motorcycle. Motorcycles are meant to be ridden smoothly.

Wow.


I just read the whole thread and there was no mention of the bike in question.

On a sidenote, I never knew MotoGP bikes have linked brakes, so that's how they can dangle their feet when braking.

I've just a few ? for you Paramud.

What kind of bike is your GF riding? How long has she been riding. How long have you been riding? What happened to make you absolutely terrified of locking your rear wheel?

Your above statements about locking up the rear are comical. I'm sorry, I don't mean to be mean, but c'mon! You really need to go ride when it's wet out. Or dewey, or areas with dirt on the road. Wait until it's time for a new rear tire and go have fun skidding. Start out on the white T in STOP at the stopsign. It makes a mark, and a squeak.

A mc brake is not power assisted, and releases the very nano-second you pick your foot up. Clutch in is a given, and a natural occurrence when practiced enough.

Practice, it takes a lot of practice, but locking the rear brake is fun when you start to get a feel for it. In the dirt or on wet pavement I will lock the rear over and over again just for.....fun and practice.

I eff around in parking lots skidding to a stop with the rear while making u-turns. I'm not training to be a stunta, just wanted to get comfortable with the rear skidding, and skidding around. I'm not completly doing a 180° skid yet, but that's my goal. To do a skidding 180, come to a stop and wheelie away without putting a foot down. I do gymkhana type drills also. It's fun and relatively risk free grinding footpegs at 15 mph.

I are on a motard and only have 10,000 miles behind me, I'm still learning.

Anehoo, about not using the rear brake in a panic stop. Please somebody shoot this myth down, I just thought of it. Myth is that if you don't touch the rear brake in a panic stop, your engine is still giving you propulsion untill the "front brake lifts the rear off the pavement." Or until the clutch gets pulled.

Yeah, because pro's and beginners alike lif the rear off the pavement when a car pulls out unexpectedly.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:04 PM   #190
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Originally Posted by Idle View Post
Anehoo, about not using the rear brake in a panic stop. Please somebody shoot this myth down, I just thought of it. Myth is that if you don't touch the rear brake in a panic stop, your engine is still giving you propulsion untill the "front brake lifts the rear off the pavement." Or until the clutch gets pulled.
Uh? How high do you run your idle? Cause when I close my throttle I start slowing down.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:22 PM   #191
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Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
I guess I should have used a period.

So you're not fast.

There we go that works better.




Pics not there any more.

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185029
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:29 PM   #192
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That's cute did you get rid of your chicken strips? That must mean your really fast...
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:32 PM   #193
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That's cute did you get rid of your chicken strips? That must mean your really fast...
I thought I didn't ride fast enough to get rid of the chicken strips?
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:36 PM   #194
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Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
Uh? How high do you run your idle? Cause when I close my throttle I start slowing down.
I don't know 1,800 or so? My bike slows immensely when I chop the throttle, it's a 650 high compression thumper though.

I/we don't know what paramud's girlfriend is riding, that's why I brought it up.

A multi cylinder bike ridden at a low rpm will carry on for a bit when you close the throttle amirite? Would that not cause stopping distances to increase if the rear brake isn't used? It's a sound argument that hasn't appeared here untill I brought it up.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:48 PM   #195
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America changed the world by introducing mandatory right foot braking...


maybe the poms were right... right hand & left foot do work well together...












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