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Old 12-08-2012, 03:45 PM   #1
a1fa OP
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Crimping wire

I am trying to practice crimping two wires. I have purchased uninsulated 16 gauge butt splice and i just happen to have this tool lying around.



Is there anything wrong with using this tool to crimp? There are some nice crimp tools on ebay, but I need this for a project, so ordering something additional may set me back a bit. I may be getting these tomorrow, because they may work better...

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a1fa screwed with this post 12-08-2012 at 03:55 PM
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Old 12-08-2012, 03:54 PM   #2
Yamarocket630
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That's pretty much what you want for occasional use.
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:29 PM   #3
Stan_R80/7
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Yea, I have a similar tool. That's what you use. Although, much like yourself, I think something 'beefier' is in order. Plus, I just don't like the crimp - prefer to solder. But, most bike/auto electrical connectors are made for crimping and not so easy to solder (which, btw, only aggravates me when I solder them). Good luck!

Stan_R80/7 screwed with this post 12-08-2012 at 04:37 PM
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:56 PM   #4
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The first crimper is *adequate*, crimpers of that type tend to deflect before they make a good crimp. They're good in a pinch, but I wouldn't use one if I didn't have to.

The second type is a far better version of the first, the frame is stout enough that it isn't going to bend and twist before the connection is made. If you're on a budget and need a crimper for the shop, get that type.

If you have the $$ to spend, a ratcheting type crimper is the way to go. Expect to spend ~$60 on the tool and another $40 for each set of dies. In return, it will create a connection that is stronger than the wire itself.


As far as soldering crimped connections goes, it is an allowed practice in ANSI J-STD 001, the guideline most industries use for controlling soldered connections. If you feel you must back up a crimped connection with solder, the correct sequence is to crimp first and then solder. Going the other way around can damage the crimping dies.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:59 PM   #5
a1fa OP
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Practice makes perfect...

The first 3 where made with the first tool. The first one was a disaster, and then I got much better at using it... but then I went to Lowes and picked up the second tool... and its amazing!

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Old 12-08-2012, 06:34 PM   #6
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Amazing what the right tool for the job will do!!

That first tool is a wire stripper and that's about it.
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:39 PM   #7
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Poor wire stripper at that... Harbor Freight's ratcheting crimper (SKU 97420) is pretty good, as is their wire stripper (SKU 98410).
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
Amazing what the right tool for the job will do!!

That first tool is a wire stripper and that's about it.
I agree. No one should crimp anything with the first one. They're probably the reason dry crimps got a bad name. When they're done with the second one, and then heat shrink is applied,(remember to put the tubing over the wire before you crimp) It's almost as good as a soldered connection.

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Old 12-08-2012, 06:49 PM   #9
a1fa OP
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Originally Posted by buickid View Post
Poor wire stripper at that... Harbor Freight's ratcheting crimper (SKU 97420) is pretty good, as is their wire stripper (SKU 98410).
I was just about the say -- it sucks at stripping as much as it sucks at cutting and crimping. I'll be doing a lot of crimping over at the "Great Damn Van" thread. Click Here!
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:57 PM   #10
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Don't forget that you can buy the quality stuff online these days.

http://www.matcotools.com/catalog/pr...CRIMPING-TOOL/
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:46 PM   #11
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the crimper has to match the connector

the first tool looks like an Amp Superchamp knock off. the real Amp tool used on Amp PIDG terminals works fine. other combinations... mebby not.

the second tool is a Stakon type. maybe more forgiving. it wil also work better with the parts it was designed to be used with

PS with the wrong tool you can be loose, or over crimp the wire and make the connection brittle
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:55 PM   #12
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I have some tools from Ancor Wire, and FTZ. They have excellent connectors as well as tinned AWG wire.

Double crimp connectors, Cool-Seal anaerobic crimps, etc. some are even s/s, and made for marine environment.

Been using them for years. I use fine stranded pre-tinned wire, and tinned connectors. Combined with shrink tubing, it is a very durable connection.
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:38 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by a1fa View Post
Practice makes perfect...

The first 3 where made with the first tool. The first one was a disaster, and then I got much better at using it... but then I went to Lowes and picked up the second tool... and its amazing!

the difference is the part of the first tool you are using.

if you had used the part for NON insulated (below the hinge) it would worked better.
I crimp a lot of uninsulated fork lugs and I use the second type,

But match the lug to the wire size,

IF you have to make do with a larger lug, fold the wire in 2 before puting the lug on and crimping. (I also work with 24-26awg at times)
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:51 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beezer View Post
the crimper has to match the connector

the first tool looks like an Amp Superchamp knock off. the real Amp tool used on Amp PIDG terminals works fine. other combinations... mebby not.

the second tool is a Stakon type. maybe more forgiving. it wil also work better with the parts it was designed to be used with

PS with the wrong tool you can be loose, or over crimp the wire and make the connection brittle

Quote:
Originally Posted by machinebuilder View Post
the difference is the part of the first tool you are using.

if you had used the part for NON insulated (below the hinge) it would worked better.
I crimp a lot of uninsulated fork lugs and I use the second type,

But match the lug to the wire size,

IF you have to make do with a larger lug, fold the wire in 2 before puting the lug on and crimping. (I also work with 24-26awg at times)
A1FA,

I hate to sound like a buzzkill, but both these guys are pretty much spot on and it would benefit you to understand what they are saying.

If someone were to post that they have a full set of SAE wrenches so they did not need buy a metric set because they could find something to fit most of the time, it would be obvious to most that there is a bit of improperness in that.

It is the same with electrical connectors and wiring. You have both insulated and uninsulated and they are two different animals, about the only thing common with them is they need to be sized properly to the wire.

As you have found out, if you use an uninsulated butt splice connector that is too large for the wire, and then try to crimp it about the only thing that happens is the connector smashes flat and then the wire slips out. Had the connector been sized properly, or even if the wire had been made bigger by folding it back on itself once or twice, you could have then crimped it with the tool and it would have held. The main issue in doing it like you did IMHO is that you have to squeeze it pretty firmly and as Beezer points out, it smashes the wires and they get work hardened and brittle and will often break right there at some inconvenient point in the future).

Additionally, if you use the "non insulated" crimp position with insulated terminals, it will cut the plastic with a firm squeeze, and if it is a heat shrink sealable connector it will cut the insulation as soon as it looks at it, then when you apply heat to seal it the little cut opens up wide and you have to re-do the entire connector.

Anyway, it sounds like you now have both styles so good on you and that should keep you going for many years. Ratcheting ones are great but if you use them improperly they won't give you a good crimp either.

I suspect if you went to a website for tools such as Klein or Greenlee, they would probably have instructions on how to use their version of the tools you have and it would be helpful for you to read those.

Apologies if this sounds like criticism, because it is not intended as such but it is attention to details such as these that enables one to eventually become a master of his craft, otherwise one never really moves past just being a hack.

Best wishes,

GM
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:02 AM   #15
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When ever possible solder connection, then double heat shrink tubing. If you going to crimp fitting get a high quality crimper
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