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Old 12-18-2012, 08:13 PM   #46
KX50002
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Originally Posted by Gonzoso View Post
Reason # 579 why I'm glad we had an armed rebellion from those fascists. I also enjoy owning guns, hunting, keeping more of my income, carrying a pocket knife, and not being watched by a creepy orwellian security system.
+579
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Old 12-18-2012, 08:18 PM   #47
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Excellent thread and a glimpse on what is going on inside the complex LEO/Speeder dynamic. thanks.

My favorite cop story, as posted in my ride report on "Montana Quickie" was that I was easing into northern Montana on a twisty back road that circles around the eastern edge of Glacier National Park. Limit was 70 MPH and I recalled the days when MT didn't have a speed limit. Weather was great, traffic non-existent and I was just getting ready to wick up the 1200GS when I saw the blue lights fire up on my tail. Pulled over and a kid about 24 years old walks up. I shook my head and said "Shouldn't someone my age be giving someone your age a ticket?". he smiled and said I've got you at 74 in a 70 zone. My jaw fell. Then he said "I really am going to give you a warning but the real reason I stopped you is that I think I kmow what you are likely to be doing down the road and you need to know there are 15 horses loose on the road just over the divide.". Sure enough, the horses were there. The kid cop also told me that the corners were clear of gravel untill about 3 miles of Browning,MT. A great stop and a smoking fun ride. I'm indebted.

Lee
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Old 12-19-2012, 07:46 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Frostback View Post
Excellent thread and a glimpse on what is going on inside the complex LEO/Speeder dynamic. thanks.
Along those lines, this book literally changed my life. I am 100% serious.

On Amazon

The writing is almost painful -- the author is a retired cop, not an English major. But it's a very clear and practical guide to interacting with law enforcement.

For example, there are several specific things to remember to do when you pull over that keep you and the cop safer, help the cop feel safer and more relaxed around you, and greatly increase the chances of a reasonable result for both of you. Widespread myths about radar and courts are addressed and dispelled, and the psychology of the cop on duty is shown in easy-to-understand terms with hundreds of examples featuring "Officer Neckvein".

Basically, you learn what common mistakes to avoid and how to behave in the ways cops want and need (be safe, be truthful, reduce fear, and along the way, feed feed feed the cop's ego...)

Most books like this are complete horse shit. This one is the real deal.
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Old 12-20-2012, 06:58 AM   #49
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I used to have a copy of that book, still might somewhere. I agree that it's a good book and has some good advice about what to do.

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Old 12-20-2012, 08:32 AM   #50
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Its not just the cop but also the jurisdiction that makes a difference. In VA, both the local cops and the State Police have shown to be fairly tolerant of higher speeds as long as I'm not being an idiot. MD is another matter entirely.
That'd be a first. Staties have proven to be arselochs IME.

One of my cycling buddies is a town cop. I hear stories... For him stupidity = ticket. More stupid = more things on the ticket. Most times he's not paying attention till at least 11 over. 'Cept in the part of town that the hoighty toighty types got designated a 15mph zone. Then they bitch too much to let many people go.

Weirdly enough, he gets lots of residents in that neighborhood for speeding. How stupid do you have to be to get your 'hood's speed limit dropped, then get popped for speeding there?!

M
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Old 12-20-2012, 09:06 AM   #51
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Weirdly enough, he gets lots of residents in that neighborhood for speeding. How stupid do you have to be to get your 'hood's speed limit dropped, then get popped for speeding there?!
Of course they write lots of tickets to people that live there, because- well, that's who drives there.
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Old 12-20-2012, 09:07 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Gummee! View Post
Weirdly enough, he gets lots of residents in that neighborhood for speeding. How stupid do you have to be to get your 'hood's speed limit dropped, then get popped for speeding there?!

M
That comes along with......but I live here I don't deserve the ticket.....
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Old 12-21-2012, 06:56 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by Frostback View Post
Excellent thread and a glimpse on what is going on inside the complex LEO/Speeder dynamic. thanks.
They have a scary job and anything I can do to help reduce the tension has got to help.

Got nicked on the GS coming down Wolf Creek Pass this past summer running 74 in a 45 (No traffic, bright sunny morning). By the time he turned around and got back to me the bike was on the centerstand, key on the seat, helmet off, drivers license, insurance, registration, and concealed carry permit in hand.

He asked and I explained that we Oklahomans get a bit excited to ride curves and hills. We ended up talking for twenty minutes as he pointed out some great routes on the map in the tankbag.

Cool guy. Walked with a warning.
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Old 12-21-2012, 07:47 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by bwringer View Post
Along those lines, this book literally changed my life. I am 100% serious.

On Amazon

The writing is almost painful -- the author is a retired cop, not an English major. But it's a very clear and practical guide to interacting with law enforcement.

For example, there are several specific things to remember to do when you pull over that keep you and the cop safer, help the cop feel safer and more relaxed around you, and greatly increase the chances of a reasonable result for both of you. Widespread myths about radar and courts are addressed and dispelled, and the psychology of the cop on duty is shown in easy-to-understand terms with hundreds of examples featuring "Officer Neckvein".

Basically, you learn what common mistakes to avoid and how to behave in the ways cops want and need (be safe, be truthful, reduce fear, and along the way, feed feed feed the cop's ego...)

Most books like this are complete horse shit. This one is the real deal.
Just purchased mine
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Old 12-22-2012, 11:55 AM   #55
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Darwin awards

I work along side LEO and have the fulfilling job of trying to save the idiots of the world after they crash. The one common factor I see with them and tickets is the direct correlation between the stupidity level of the event and whether they get cited. If you're hell bent on ridding the gene pool of morons they will happily write you a ticket. I have transported numerous patients with either a ticket already in their pocket or the officer on his way to the ED to write one out.
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Old 12-22-2012, 06:39 PM   #56
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LEOs are people and, as such, all different, so I don't think there's a pat answer to this question.
+1

Back to Utah... In 1999 going from Park City to Denver on US-40 in Eastern Utah near Strawberry Reservoir, my buddy and I were ticketed for 84 in a 65 after the county deputy radar locked us at 100 mph. There's more to the story, but it all worked out, and the ticket was $65. It never showed up on my record, either!

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Old 12-22-2012, 08:22 PM   #57
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For the last 20 months, I have commuted daily on my 2002 BMW R1150 RTP. After September until late March, the mornings are mostly dark when I go in. I hardly ever see anyone pulled over. So, I started to expect that I would not get pulled over. Well that changed a few weeks ago. While rushing to work, my radio box on my used police bike popped open. I keep my tools in a Tupperware basket in the radio box. For the box to open, I have to be going too fast. It has to be unlocked. When it taps me in the back at 75-80MPH, it is startling. So, this day like the 4-5 times before, I put on my caution lights and pull over. Unlike the other times after stopping, I realized there was Leo behind me. He pulled his marked police car in front of me with his blinking red and blue lights on. 'Oh shit', I reflect. I am sure this amused the pack of cars I just passed. But, this officer's posture seemed a little off. The Leo rushed out of his car and walked up to me with his hands on his hips. I felt I was being judged, and he didn't say anything. He just looked at me. It was 39F and 5:20AM in November, so it was dark. My intent on stopping was to lock my radio box. But, the officer surprised me. With him standing next to me with his hands on my hips, I began rambling. 'My radio box popped open'. I took of my helmet off and added 'I am running late for work'. 'I had to check my tires and put air them this morning and that made me later than normal.' 'I think I woke up my neighbors with the air compressor'. When I stopped rambling, he said: "I would like to make a request that you don't go zipping passed marked police cars." While he was walking backing to his car obviously to leave, I said, "thanks for not giving me a ticket". He slammed his door and speed off leaving me sitting in the cold with my helmet off.The whole exchange was my fastest and most delightful encounter with a LEO. It also taught me that rushing because I am late lowers my situational awareness. If I didn't have a camera on my bike, I wouldn't have known this. I reviewed the video to find that a few seconds before I passed a semi truck in lane two from lane three. There was tiny refection of the marked police car's seal from a street light that I missed. He was in lane one. I should have saw this, but I think feeling rushed and my face shield fogging lowered my situational awareness this day.

The road:
| 1 | 2 | 3
1= police car
2= semi
3= me

luckygrownup screwed with this post 12-22-2012 at 08:36 PM
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:27 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostback View Post
Excellent thread and a glimpse on what is going on inside the complex LEO/Speeder dynamic. thanks.

My favorite cop story, as posted in my ride report on "Montana Quickie" was that I was easing into northern Montana on a twisty back road that circles around the eastern edge of Glacier National Park. Limit was 70 MPH and I recalled the days when MT didn't have a speed limit. Weather was great, traffic non-existent and I was just getting ready to wick up the 1200GS when I saw the blue lights fire up on my tail. Pulled over and a kid about 24 years old walks up. I shook my head and said "Shouldn't someone my age be giving someone your age a ticket?". he smiled and said I've got you at 74 in a 70 zone. My jaw fell. Then he said "I really am going to give you a warning but the real reason I stopped you is that I think I kmow what you are likely to be doing down the road and you need to know there are 15 horses loose on the road just over the divide.". Sure enough, the horses were there. The kid cop also told me that the corners were clear of gravel untill about 3 miles of Browning,MT. A great stop and a smoking fun ride. I'm indebted.

Lee
+1

The cops mostly have a live and let live attitude here. I've noticed over the 5 years I have lived here that the cops only mess with you when you are being stupid or could endanger others. I've never had a bad experience with the cops here.
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:43 PM   #59
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I haven't read through the entire thread... But I'll answer the OP's questions(based on my own opinions) and add some insight.

Been a cop for almost a decade in a decently sized city that has high violent crime rate. One of worst in state for auto-accidents, and we used to have one of highest stolen car rates.

For Question#1.
I rarely stop MC riders for speed, if ever. Only when they are doing something crazy, dangerous and obviously reckless will I make a stop.

Question #2.
Be courteous, respectful, apologize, and do not argue. Typically, I am not out to give tickets. I am out to take criminals to jail, not every day tax paying joes. I work in a dangerous city and am focused on drug dealers, gang members, and the like. However, if your an asshole, argue with me, or deny what you did(basically acting like you did nothing wrong) a ticket is what you will get. I saw what I saw, and did not pull you over for the hell of it. Cops do not like to create work for themselves. I am not going to pull someone over for running a red light, or speeding because I WANT to. I do it because I saw a blatant violation and felt the need to take action....

Now there are stops on suspected criminal elements for petty violations(called pre-text stop). Typically these stops are for small violation to see who they are and what they are doing.... But in these cases, we criminal profile(looking for those guys you wouldnt want your daughter dating). If you look like a normal person, you probably have little to worry about.

I can't speak for highway patrol, or rural area cops without much going on. I work a busy city, so a traffic ticket on a speeding MC rider is low on my priority list. Go to some podunk county, or get on the freeway and your fair game to the highway/state patrol who love tickets more than their mothers...

However, being a MC enthusiast, I definitely cut some slack to my fellow riders.
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Old 12-23-2012, 06:03 PM   #60
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Its pretty simple.

After 35 years of being an Officer, supervisor and now a Chief its all attitude. If you have a bad one I have a place for you to go that you are not going to like. I don't make a stop on for infractions, only arrestable offenses.

I always stop for bikes on the side of the road to see if they need help and hope someone will do the same for me if Im stranded.
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