ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-12-2014, 09:32 PM   #1
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
News from the Transistor Planet: Coast-to-Coast-to-Coast

Good evening from the Transistor Planet, and welcome to my Ride Report. If you'll indulge, a little history first.

On May 27th, I'll graduate from law school :.

It's been a strange trip, I'll say that much. I'm a back-to-schooler, having done stints as a high school teacher and a waiter, all here in New York City. Those were tough years, for separate reasons, but it's actually something of a surprise to me that I find myself once again at the beginning of a new career. Supposedly, as children, we all have ideas of what we'll grow up to be - and then as we age, we come to reluctant terms with the milder people we've actually become.

That's always been tough for me to accept. Likewise, being that kind of person poses real difficulties - namely, a sort of ever-present, gnawing dissatisfaction with the current state of things. I wish it was ambition, but I think it'd be more accurate to describe as some mixture of nostalgia, stubbornness, and a touch of panic.

Somewhere during this last couple years I stumbled upon an old dream of riding motorcycles. I remember the moment the dream first came to me: fifteen years old, a carful of buddies in a friend's mom's Volvo, courtesy of his newly-minted driver's license. It was a school night, probably midnight, and the streets of Palo Alto were desolate. Red light at the corner of Page Mill and El Camino, for those of you that know it. It was loud inside the car, a great feeling to be alone with each other, raucous and hilarious. A whining sound came from somewhere in the night, slowly growing on the periphery of our conversation. Suddenly a sportbike blasted across the intersection in full wheelie, like a lime-green banshee, and disappeared instantaneously into the night.

The car was silent. Something had happened to my heart. A couple of moments before we were the toast of the town - the mysterious wheelieman had shattered that. He was on another planet, barely human. Experiencing things we hadn't even dreamed of.

I hope that guy is reading this now. Even if he isn't, I don't doubt that some of you have been that vision to somebody, in some form or another.

Many years later, that vision revisited me. I was in the middle of a crushing breakup, sleeping on my brother's living room floor. I was back in school at nearly 30, restarting my life when all my friends were settling in. My commute was on crowded subways, crowded sidewalks, crowded buses and elevators. I needed some room to breathe, and to get away.

So: a motorcycle.

Before I knew it, I was combing Craigslist like a true obsessive, thirty or forty tabs open at a time. In class, out of class. The dream was sustaining me, but it was still only a dream. I was trying to have fun, not get myself killed, so the 2002 Honda Rebel I found - blacked-out, bobbed, bullet signals, cocktail shaker mufflers, and a brown leather solo seat - was perfect in every way.



I rode it for a year. My first ride into Manhattan was across the Manhattan bridge immediately after Hurricane Sandy. It seemed like the whole city was empty, and pitch black. Hardly anybody anywhere. No stop lights, no cars, just a few ghostly apparitions whisking by on bicycles. Mad Max as it gets. I missed Houston Street because it looked like any other street, which, as a New Yorker, is saying something.

I rode all winter, with my hands on the engine at red lights to keep them warm. I'd take it out in the middle of the night to find empty roads, then let the engine open up a little, lean into the turns, generally scare the crap out of myself.

By summer, it seemed time to step up to something larger. I wanted to travel. The whole point had been to escape The City, hadn't it? Somehow I fell in love with Harley Sportsters. I'd never ridden one - or anything other than my Honda - which probably explains how I ended up on a 1996 XL1200C with no signals, no speedometer, no fuel gauge of any kind, white grips on crooked bars, and a sparkly gold gas tank.



I took that one up to Maine, two days each way. Beyond that trip, the bike never really had a chance to stretch its legs. Brooklyn is stop and go. So is Manhattan. Half the streets look like they were paved out of spite. The other half look like they were paved by drunkards, out of spite. Not the right bike for the job, in the end, but I loved her dearly. I learned to change oil, adjust levers and cables, perform chain maintenance. Last winter I rebuilt the carburetor. It took me a month. When I got it back on, the whole machine howled and boomed like it was glad to be alive.

As the end of school approached, I reflected. I'd done well enough to land a good job that would be waiting for me in the fall. I was excited, but also worried about the thought of diving deeper into this city that I hate and love (and hate). I started fantasizing about trips I should take before it all goes down. What else was there to do but the grandest, longest, heaviest ride I could? Patagonia? Wrong season. Africa, then, from Addis down to Cape Town? Pretty damn high barriers to entry on that trip, even beyond matters of the bike. Well, why not give this old country a look? So there it is. From Brooklyn, I head west. Or north. I'll have from mid-August until the end of September. I have friends and family scattered throughout the land, but for now, I have no mission other than to go far and see what there is to see. (That sounds like something - am I quoting something there?)

I looked long and hard at the Harley. Once, taking her down Nostrand Avenue - a road like the surface of the Moon, but harder - she vibrated both battery terminal bolts and three of four license plate bolts right off. Dropped them in the road and I never found them. She bottomed out regularly. Most troublingly, she was exhausting on long stretches of highway: full windblast in the chest, hours on end. She wasn't the right thing, much as I wanted her to be.

I sold that bike last Tuesday. Sold it to the guy I bought it from, actually. I was just putting up the ad when I thought of his face as I'd first ridden away - wistful. He was having a moment he didn't fully understand. It's a feeling we all know. Why do motorcycles do this to us?

He told me he hadn't been able to find a bike he wanted in the meanwhile. Had tried out 8 sportsters. "This one is special," he said. I almost couldn't go through with it, but he was so happy, so eager. I hadn't changed a thing on the bike - and how often can our type say that? Besides, I admired the symmetry of the whole occasion. One year, and back from whence ye came.

So, the present day.

All things willing, I will finish my last exam on Thursday night, an excruciating eight-hour exercise in self-zombification. Typical law school way to go out. Sunday, I'll head up to Connecticut, with a cash-stuffed envelope I can't even remotely spare, to buy the ride that will take me across the country. Haven't done the deal, yet, so you don't get pictures, but they're coming, rest assured.

This thread will, I hope, be a way for me to share the experience of planning the trip, and maybe the ride itself as well. I'd like to get off the Transistor Planet for a little while, as riders do. But as we all know, sometimes the only way out is further in, neh?

I've always admired the way motorcycle people come together however they can - these forums are a testament to the good-heartedness and charitable spirit of those who use two wheels because four just won't do. I encourage your comments and participation in any way you see fit: route-planning, gear advice, general encouragement. Sheeit, if you want me to lay flowers at your great-aunt Edna's grave in Bellingham, WA, or snap a photo of the heart you and your sweetheart carved in the old oak outside Denton, TX? I don't have much in the way of other plans...

This is News from the Transistor Planet.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)

transistorplanet screwed with this post 05-12-2014 at 09:58 PM
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2014, 04:53 PM   #2
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Bike!

I think my first post was too crazy and too long. This one will be shorter and hopefully less crazy.

I bought the new bike from a genuine fellow named Mike in Bristol, Connecticut. I know he's an inmate on here, somewhere. If anyone knows him (from this thread: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=613012) maybe you could let him know so he can follow the pilgrim's progress. Of course I can always e-mail him myself...

Here she is:



And here we are together, our first ride - which, gloriously, was 100 miles of blissfully unblocked Merritt Parkway. Streams, green grass, hills and sweepers... And a fresh bike, lovingly maintained and perfectly suited to this sort of travel.



She's NYC inspected, Brooklyn-insured, and putting me through my paces as I learn how to tiptoe a tall bike around. Potential for a Finger Lakes group ride in the coming weeks, but stay tuned for shorter jaunts around the city as summer sets in.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2014, 11:17 PM   #3
basepc
Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2009
Oddometer: 78
A road trip sounds like the perfect way to bridge careers.
basepc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2014, 01:21 AM   #4
MK1
wills
 
Joined: Dec 2013
Location: offshore
Oddometer: 5
Thumb

do it buddy. to many people talk or dream about doing a long trip of a lifetime and never actually do it. don't worry about where to go and what to do, just go and let the journey happen. that's the way I do it anyway and things always work out fine. good luck. I'm subscribed.
MK1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2014, 06:57 AM   #5
cldiver
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2013
Location: dartmouth ns
Oddometer: 125
Do the trip. I went across canada 2 yrs ago and I'm going across the states this year. It is a wonderful way to be free and travel.
cldiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2014, 09:07 PM   #6
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Touring/Commuting Gear

Thanks to y'all for the encouragement - much appreciated in these early wandering phases. I was hoping for some advice about purchasing some riding gear, and thought I'd put it out to the public.

I'm looking to buy some pants/jacket/combo for this trip, but if it could suit my future needs (which might be a tad unusual) as well, all the better.

I currently have around-town riding stuff, but my new job in the fall will require the 18th Century fancy-dress costume called a Suit. I was hoping to keep commuting on the bike. I can't go through the whole rigamarole of changing completely at the office, so I'll have to ride at least partially in work clothes. From what I've seen so far, Aerostich products are the gold standard in easily-removable, touring-capable riding overclothes. I could find a way to swing the monstrous cash outlay, I guess...

But I'd love to hear suggestions that might potentially suit those dual purposes: NYC commuting in dress clothes, and a cross-country tour. Geez, sounds like a rank newbie question (which I am, so...): "What kind of gear can I get for all seasons and all riding conditions???"

I know it's a tall order. If it comes down to it, I'll get stuff for the tour and worry about commuting in the fall. Anyway, thoughts?

Thanks as always for reading and your responses.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2014, 09:08 PM   #7
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by cldiver View Post
Do the trip. I went across canada 2 yrs ago and I'm going across the states this year. It is a wonderful way to be free and travel.
Also, Cldiver,

What's your cross-country route and timing looking like? Would love to hear more about your plans.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)

transistorplanet screwed with this post 05-24-2014 at 09:42 PM
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2014, 11:58 AM   #8
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Ergonomic Problems

Having owned the bike for a couple weeks now, I'm realizing that I have some ergonomic problems that will need to be addressed before any long-distance trips can take place.

[The Cloisters, Fort Tryon Park overlooking the Hudson River]



The source of the problem:

I have an "impingement" between two of my cervical vertebrae - this is also known as a herniated or compressed disc. It just means that a little nerve "meat" sticks out between two discs. The effect is that certain body positions can cause substantial discomfort, and riding long distances in these positions cause discomfort that lasts for days. I'm worried that an 8-10,000 mile under these circumstances could cause permanent problems - and, well, I'd like not to be uncomfortable anyway.

The Bike:

While the Strom has what most would consider an almost totally upright riding position, even the minimal forward lean that it requires is exacerbating my neck problems. A lot of my weight is falling on my wrists, pushing my shoulders back and creating tension in my upper back and neck. On the Harley, I sat bolt upright, with mid-controls that kept my knees at roughly 90 degree bends. This meant that my weight was mostly on my butt, and my arms were light and loose on the handlebars. Now, I'm having trouble keeping my weight off my wrists.

I'm think I'm going to need to adjust the riding position in at least one of the following ways. I know very little about all of this, so I'd love to hear what everyone's thoughts are on this.

1) Raise the bars and bring them closer to me. Most of the risers I've seen on twistedthrottle etc. seem to raise the bars about 1-2", which actually may not be enough. It seems likely that any greater amount of rise will guarantee the need for longer cables, which aren't cheap (on top of the expense of risers). I've been looking at Rox adjustable risers. The adjustability, given my neck problems, seems worth extra cash. Paying for new cables when the ones I have work perfectly well kind of irks me.

2) New bars. I've seen here that some people don't like the strom's stock bars. Besides their placement, I haven't felt like complaining yet. However, if aftermarket risers don't get the job done, then I may need to add a set of aftermarket handlebars.

3) footpeg position. Having my feet in a sportier position than the Harley is also, I think, contributing to the distribution of my weight forward onto my wrists. I'm pretty sure I would benefit from moving the pegs both forward and down. I haven't really looked into this yet, but the products I've seen don't seem like they're going to do the trick: they measure the position change in millimeters, which is probably too slight of a change.

I'm bummed that this is a problem - mostly because, while the condition is uncomfortable, it hasn't actually yet prevented me from doing anything in particular. I know that physical therapy and core exercises will likely help, but it's a difficult condition to exercise with. I'll be seeing a physical therapist soon to discuss.

Any suggestions or feedback, whether it be body-related or bike-related, are welcome...!
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2014, 04:10 AM   #9
XRman
Beastly Adventurer
 
XRman's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: SW Victoria
Oddometer: 2,530
Get some low level laser therapy on your neck and back,wrists. It will help.

Sent from my MB525 using Tapatalk 2
__________________
Green Triangle ADVrider

Suzuki DRZ400 wide ratio ACT gearbox
Suzuki DL650 Glee
XRman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2014, 01:19 PM   #10
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by XRman View Post
Get some low level laser therapy on your neck and back,wrists. It will help.
Never heard of it... is it something insurance will cover?
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2014, 07:38 PM   #11
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Did almost 200 miles today. Group ride from Brooklyn out to Harriman State Park. Best ride that I know of within a day of NYC. Lake Tiorati Drive, 7 Lakes, etc. Curvy, windy, elevation changes, all in a Robin Hood-feeling wooded glade setting. Finish up at Bear Mountain, with beautiful view in all direction. The top is crowded with classic cars and bikes of all types - everything from Harley guys with tribal tats, clustered together smoking Newports, to fully Rangered-out supersport kiddos, whose rearsets are mounted so high they're almost sitting on their heels. Lots of low two-fingered waves, though, which meant the mood was high. And why not? It was a perfect morning, and we sufferers of the NY winter live for this - the reason we pay insurance that costs as much as our bikes, that we pay garage fees as much as your rent. The darker the winter, the brighter the spring.

I encourage anyone visiting New York to check out Union Garage in Red Hook, Brooklyn. They organized the ride, and it was superb. They're attached to and loosely affiliated with Moto Borgotaro, a high-end mechanic specializing in bikes I can't afford.

A kind soul from these very boards has sent me - for FREE - a pair of up-and-back risers to address the pinching in my neck and shoulder. He will be honored more comprehensively in following posts.

For now, I'm feeling good but still vaguely aimless about the trip. I'm starting to think about Canada - that maybe I can avoid some boring Northeast US by skirting the Great Lakes to the North instead of the South. I'm also starting to wonder how far North I can get in September in Canada... Maybe I should make a terminal push for the Arctic Circle... abandon all pretensions of a grand American tour... go straight for the jugular, the Great White North.

The Wee shut itself off today, just as I was pulling in the garage. Shut itself down and gave me a "CHEC" light, along with a red dot in the oil pressure LED. First problem I've had with the bike. I don't know the first thing about it, really - I was just getting used to the Harley.

I checked the fuses, and found the fan behind the radiator (I've never had a liquid-cooled bike before), spinning it to make sure it wasn't stuck. Maybe that's the weird fluttering sound I've been hearing from the front end sometimes. It spun, and I was starting to google things like "DL650 overheat cooldown" when it occurred to me to text the previous owner. He replied right away - as he always has - and suggested unscrewing one of the battery terminals. Something about bypassing a fault, or defaulting an error, or something that sounded more like computers than motorcycles. Anyway, I tried it, and LO! the bike was fine. What a world we live in.

Best regards as always.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 12:02 PM   #12
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
new gloves and boots!

Picked up new gloves and boots yesterday at Union Garage, in Brooklyn. They don't have the selection of an online retailer, obviously, but they choose their wares carefully, are deeply knowledgeable about the products, offer the same prices as you'll get online, and provide some extremely important services that many of us in the motorcycle world do not enjoy all the time.

1) Community. I went on a 200-mile group ride up through Bear Mountain with 11 guys on the Union Garage mailing list. Feeling like part of a community means a ton when you don't have a lot of moto buddies. Here's a view from the Rockefeller Lookout, on the Jersey side of the Hudson River:



Here's the Bear Mountain Lookout:



2) Opportunity to look at gear in person. It never looks the same. I repeat: it never looks the same. Never fits the way you'd expect, either.

3) Supporting local businesses. I do this for entirely self-serving reasons. The more online and mass retail comes to dominate the entire world, the more this is important to me. For one, the character of my city's environment benefits from smaller retailers - I can have a relationship with the proprietors and employees, which makes me happier and results in much better advice and service. For another, it reduces the uniformity of place that seems to be a natural result of mass business run amok. I spent a few months in Barcelona back in 2007, and found the whole thing surprisingly depressing. It wasn't that different from Brooklyn, in some very meaningful ways. Every time I walked past an H&M, drank a coke, whatever, I felt like I was being deprived of the meaning of travel. I travel to see new things and places - the more each place is the same, the less possible meaningful travel becomes.

Anyway, the GEAR:

Sidi On-Road Goretex boots, and Rev'it Summit H20's. Haven't had a chance to ride in them, but here's what I like already.



1) replaceable soles on the boots. I'm flat-footed and overpronate quite a lot. This means that I wear the back-outside edges of my boot soles out fast. With all the walking on concrete that a NY'er does - hard to imagine a place where this is more elemental to the way of life - I replace the soles on my Red Wings every single year, if not more. Replaceable soles on these boots means I can hold onto these boots as long as the uppers last - not as long as the soft soles can withstand my deformed gait

2) Fit, for both. The boots run a natural Euro 45, which is roughly a US 11. The gloves are perfect in every finger except a tad long for my left pointer-finger - that shouldn't be a problem, since I clutch with all four [p.s. is there a way around that? I really feel like I'd prefer the control I maintain over the bike from using a two-finger clutch lever... Maybe I'll think about this...]

3) value, for the gloves. The boots are expensive and we'll see, but $135 for gloves that are nominally waterproof and have good features like palm sliders is surprisingly rare.

Next up: what jacket and pants?!

I'm looking at Aerostich (of course), but Chris at Union Garage has me looking at some Rev'It combos. Meaningfully, the Neptune jacket/pant would cost as much as the RC - look better, but cost the same. More details to come, and thanks for reading.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 01:37 PM   #13
Shaggie
Unseen University
 
Shaggie's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Oddometer: 2,573
liking your style , transistorman

subbed

carry on
__________________
Shane

"We are not at home to Mr Reasonable" - Sam Vimes

NZ Touring pics:Brass Monkey 2009:Kiwi Sun:Tiki-touring: Daytrips in NZ
Shaggie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2014, 12:03 PM   #14
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
So, inmate 10/10ths sent me a pair of (what I think) are Gen-Mar up-and-back risers... Gratis! Love the inmates, what a group.

Here they are:



Anyway, so I went to install them, and found - as many have before me - that ABS V-stroms have barely long enough front brake lines. I could barely lift the bars out of the bottom half of the risers. I didn't spend much time playing with cable routing (mostly because I've never had a faired bike before, and I'm intimidated by all that plastic...!), which seems like the ordinary first step.

HOWEVER, since I'm looking for a good amount of up-and-back, I knew there was a good chance I'd end up with some Hi bars as well. So I went ahead and ordered a longer Galfer SS front brake line from Blair at SVracing.

I'm pretty cheap sometimes (mostly when it comes to unsexy parts like brake lines), so I was glad that Blair didn't get frustrated with my million questions. The stock extension lengths were +2" and +3", and I was worried that wouldn't be enough, so he arranged for a +4" custom extension!! What a guy.

I also ordered a single banjo bleeder to make the install easier (don't know how yet, but I have the manual and a decent Google I picked up online), and some motul brake fluid.

Can't say enough about customer service like that. Will post pics of the install process when the parts arrive.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2014, 04:08 PM   #15
transistorplanet OP
Adventurer
 
transistorplanet's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Oddometer: 18
Front brake line to replace the too-short OEM line (apparently a problem for anyone with an ABS Strom trying to do risers/bars) is HERE!!



Was excited and nervous for this, since I've yet to do any work on this bike - and frankly I'm pretty intimidated. I did some fairly involved stuff on my previous bike, a Sportster - but this bike has fairings and *gasp* electronics! I can't even see the engine.

I ordered a special +4" line from Blair at SVracing, who has come very highly recommended on these forums. I'm still waiting on the brake fluid to arrive - guess I thought they would come together - to do the swap.

If anybody can point me in the direction of a good thread or how-to for this process, I'd be much obliged. I have the complete manual (and a decent google machine...) but it's always good to read about the trials and travails of ordinary folk.

---

Last thing... After probably three months of hemming and hawing, I pulled the trigger on a Roadcrafter. They have a pretty amazing sale going on to empty out inventory for their new R3 models, so I jumped on it. An all-grey Ultralight, which as I understand it is equivalent to the new R-3 Light Tactical.

I went for the Ultralight because I'm much more concerned about being hot than cold. If it's cold, I'm bundling up anyway, and the RC can fit fleeces, long underwear, etc. underneath. Hot weather is the hardest for me to cope with, since I have to fight the urge to ride in my t-shirt. NYC is crazy riding, no question, but I spend about 40% of my time roasting at stop lights, and I rarely hit 40mph. In other words, my riding = your traffic jams. Point being, I most want to ensure I have an easy, viable option for scorching weather, when I'm least likely to make a smart safety decision. Hopefully, the Ultralight will arrive soon, and I'll get a chance to post some pics and a first-look review.

Thanks as always for reading.
__________________
Coast-to-Coast (NYC->CA->NYC), August/September 2014

2008 Suzuki V-Strom 650A, matte black and cold as ice.
1996 HD Sportster 1200C (sold)
2002 Honda Rebel (sold)
transistorplanet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014