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Old 12-30-2012, 05:55 PM   #16
dmftoy1
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In addition to checking out buildings they've put up ask about the crew you'll be getting. Most outfits have multiple crews and if you get the dregs your building will show. I gave my crew beer and grilled lunch for them a couple of times and was treated really well. (Ragland)

What would I do differently?

More windows, better layout, and I would've run the plumbing in the slab to allow me to heat it (radiant ) at a later date. I would've also put in an oil change pit to let me stand vertical under car.

Build bigger than you think you should

Just my .02
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Old 12-31-2012, 05:42 AM   #17
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I suggest a "BETTER" web search is in order as there are plenty of plans out there. Also lots of truss designs,etc.. Fact that you are dealing with codes on size dictates what? That needs a hard look. In my area there are no codes(elec inspec & some plumbing which varies with property size) & that's a two edged sword as it gets you some nasty people turned loose & some comfort to do what fits your needs & budget. Perhaps you can look at a pole barn built with treated frame & metal, option of few rounds of blocks at bottom of walls or not or look at blocks all the way rather than pole bldg.
My out bldgs are all treated frames with sawmill rough board & batten walls but I have a mill & own land with timber too. I built my trusses on one bldg , bought them for another. Blocks would be my 1st choice for you w/o knowing all your details but you're having said "a lift someday". Blocks are almost zero maintenance plus cheap & you live in tornado land so better in that way.
The end use has some say in whats best such as auto body painting vs. whatever? You have opened a large area that can be answered in part by more web looking. The plans are there for pole bldgs..Go actually look at existing bldgs & talk to those that build/
built them. Can you build it all?
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:06 AM   #18
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i built a 32' x 80' x 10' (i'm sitting in it now..) by myself with some help from friends 5-6 years ago. i cut lotsa corners, and built it cheap (like under 22k with concrete..try doing that...). there are some things i'd do different. the only labor i paid for was concrete finishing, and site leveling. i rented a bobcat to do the post drilling, and a lift to install the truss. everything else i did with what i had. most of the time i worked alone and worked long hours to get it done. there are a couple of jobs you cannot do yourself (installing trusses and roofing) you can feasibly do everything with 1 person. it takes a long time alone. 2 people can do the job 3 times faster.

if i built another i'd probably just have someone do it. the crew of 3 that can build a 40x60 in 3 days is amazingly fast. but they do it day in day out and are good at it. it's probably worth the 5k or so they'll make profit to get it done. if you shop around, there are deals out there.

i would have built 40' wide instead of 32. i would have went with 2' overhangs instead of 1'. everything else is stuff you can do after the fact. i also should have went with a taller roll up door.

i bought custom trusses, should have designed the building around pre-made common truss sizes, would have saved more money..this is the onlly thing aside from the concrete that was delivered to the site. everything else i picked up as i needed it.

i bought the steel direct from the manufacturer, i ordered exactly what i needed, and saved a ton of money that way. (i.e. i went to factory and picked it up with a car hauler.) steel is heavy.

once you have the basics up, everything inside is doable alone.

i built it without any plans, and built it on the fly. it all worked out, but i spent a lot of time planning stuff out. once them poles are in the ground, it's awfully difficult to move them. there are lotsa plans available online. i started out in college for architecture so i already had a good basis for how things worked...

i built an insulated office/heated space that's 24'x32'x8' internal. if i did it again i would have planned for passive solar heating, as i have to tear a bunch of shit apart to install it in the future.... i probably should have planned for radiant floor, but i was on a tight budget.

i have no windows, (i do have windows on the inside office to look out at the storage part of the building)... and just a 36"' man door and a rollup. i saw no need for more. and have not ever thought about adding any...windows add security and privacy issues, so i never put any in. i do have video surveillance/recording so i can see what's going on outside if i want to look...

i still have things to do to it externally, just never got around to trimming it out completely, etc.. a couple days of labor and i could finish it, but i'd rather be riding/racing then fucking with it. i'm rural so i got no "appearances" to keep up :)

the rent i saved in a year (or less) paid for the building. i sold a few decent dollar bikes to pay for the initial cost of the building

feel free to pm me any questions...
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Old 12-31-2012, 07:53 AM   #19
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I work for the Home Builders Institute and teach at the local Job Corps...I really enjoy seeing folks do their own builds. Especially when it involves students. We do a lot of builds here and have worked out deals where my students are made available to the community to assist. Puts a little bit of money in the students pocket and the experience they gain is priceless! Check Habitat for Humanity for overstock sales...sometimes we get too many windows...doors...etc.
My point...utilize the local schools...it will benefit everyone!! Cheers folks!
Keep building!
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Old 12-31-2012, 08:47 AM   #20
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I don't have room for one but I daydream constantly about the day when I can build one. My dreams:

Overhead doors at each end= pull the boat in after a day of fishing and leave it hooked to the truck to prep for the next day and just drive straight out. I would also have 8' fluorescent fixtures on reel arrangement so I could lower the fixture closer over the top of the boat,

Plant air= wire the building for 480 so when the funds became available I could get a 25-35 hp compressor. Build a kick out on the outside of the building to house the compressor so you don't have to listen to it run. Run a main 6" steel header down the center of the building with taps every 10' to run drops where you need them with 1" poly tubing ( can't remember what it's called but similar to PEX but designed for air. The oversized header will help you deal with head loss of the length of the run so you'll be able to run high demand tools far away from the compressor.

Gantry cranes= two of them running parallel to each axis of the building.

Car lift= a grease pit as mentioned earlier is a cool old school idea. However, put the lift in and area where you have overhead room and when the day of that dream hot rod (fill in the blank of dream toy car) comes and you can store it on the lift, overhead and out of the way.

Bike lift= recessed in the floor

Real concrete floor= six inch thick 8,000 lb mix with wire mesh and fiber, will not cost that much more than four inch crap. Proof roll the base to minimize heave, augment the base if needed. Run radiant only in the areas where you'll have an office or be standing for long periods.

These are just some of my "if I could only" wishes, maybe someday. Good luck
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:18 PM   #21
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You said POLE BARN, I had mine built by a company out of OLK. that built 342 barns in a year, it is all they do. Mine is 30x50 clear span with wooden truss. Then I had a contractor pour the concrete after the pole barn was built. This is the cheapest route to take, they built the barn $1,000.00 cheaper than I could even buy the materials for and build it my self. If you go this route plan what doors you want and where and if you want utilitys under the slab or enter the side. Good Luck.
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:53 PM   #22
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I can almost guarantee you that a car lift is cheaper than putting in an oil change pit in the floor. Lots of concrete and time,concrete forms,and it is difficult to dig a smallish pit to any depth with a backhoe. I have BTDT on the pit construction.
If you do put in a car lift, excavate deeper to pour a thicker slab where the lift columns sit. I would even add some steel reinforcing under the columns as well
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Old 01-01-2013, 12:55 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by arcanum View Post
I can almost guarantee you that a car lift is cheaper than putting in an oil change pit in the floor. Lots of concrete and time,concrete forms,and it is difficult to dig a smallish pit to any depth with a backhoe. I have BTDT on the pit construction.
If you do put in a car lift, excavate deeper to pour a thicker slab where the lift columns sit. I would even add some steel reinforcing under the columns as well
+1
The pits can be a death trap too. A lift is far more versatile also.
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Old 01-01-2013, 10:49 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by stainlesscycle View Post
i built a 32' x 80' x 10' (i'm sitting in it now..)

if i built another i'd probably just have someone do it. the crew of 3 that can build a 40x60 in 3 days is amazingly fast. but they do it day in day out and are good at it. it's probably worth the 5k or so they'll make profit to get it done. if you shop around, there are deals out there.

i would have built 40' wide instead of 32. i would have went with 2' overhangs instead of 1'. everything else is stuff you can do after the fact. i also should have went with a taller roll up door.

once you have the basics up, everything inside is doable alone.

i built it without any plans, and built it on the fly. it all worked out, but i spent a lot of time planning stuff out. once them poles are in the ground, it's awfully difficult to move them. there are lotsa plans available online. i started out in college for architecture so i already had a good basis for how things worked...

i built an insulated office/heated space that's 24'x32'x8' internal. if i did it again i would have planned for passive solar heating, as i have to tear a bunch of shit apart to install it in the future.... i probably should have planned for radiant floor, but i was on a tight budget.

i have no windows, (i do have windows on the inside office to look out at the storage part of the building)... and just a 36"' man door and a rollup. i saw no need for more. and have not ever thought about adding any...windows add security and privacy issues, so i never put any in. i do have video surveillance/recording so i can see what's going on outside if i want to look...


feel free to pm me any questions...

THANKS FOR THE GREAT RESPONSE!!

WON'T build it myself because this is my ONLY shot at this. I know I COULD build a "Decent" building, BUT I think on a onetime shot like this it would be "Cost Effective" to pay some PROS to get it right the first time. You guys know how it is - when you take on just about ANY project for the first time - by the time your finished with it you really begin to get a hang of what you're doing and think " BOY I'd really do a much better job, in 1/2 the time - the NEXT time"..
I'm 57 - which is WHY - i think I can afford to build one - BUT THERE'S NOT going to be a NEXT time!

Will pm you with questions my good man and thanks again for all the info!!!!!!

greywolves screwed with this post 01-01-2013 at 11:03 AM
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:04 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
I suggest a "BETTER" web search is in order as there are plenty of plans out there.

Also lots of truss designs,etc..

Fact that you are dealing with codes on size dictates what?

Perhaps you can look at a pole barn built with treated frame & metal, option of few rounds of blocks at bottom of walls or not or look at blocks all the way rather than pole bldg.

My out bldgs are all treated frames with sawmill rough board & batten walls but I have a mill & own land with timber too. I built my trusses on one bldg , bought them for another. Blocks would be my 1st choice for you w/o knowing all your details but you're having said "a lift someday".

Blocks are almost zero maintenance plus cheap & you live in tornado land so better in that way.
The end use has some say in whats best such as auto body painting vs. whatever? You have opened a large area that can be answered in part by more web looking. The plans are there for pole bldgs..Go actually look at existing bldgs & talk to those that build/
built them.

THANKS for HELPING!

BETTER search - I've usually been Googleing pole barn designs etc., Got some ideas for me? .

Importance of truss designs? Just so you don't have supports in the middle of the floor? You built your own on one so sound like you've got a TON of knowledge on these??

"Codes" on size only dictates that because I have 3 1/3 acres the county allows me ONLY 2400 sq. ft. of any and ALL outbuildings on my property.

YOUR RIGHT about "Tornado Land" and I NEVER even thought about a block building. Just ASSUMED it would be too costly $$$$. I think I might have to look into this.
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:04 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by xtnomad View Post
You said POLE BARN, I had mine built by a company out of OLK. that built 342 barns in a year, it is all they do. Mine is 30x50 clear span with wooden truss. Then I had a contractor pour the concrete after the pole barn was built. This is the cheapest route to take, they built the barn $1,000.00 cheaper than I could even buy the materials for and build it my self. If you go this route plan what doors you want and where and if you want utilitys under the slab or enter the side. Good Luck.
YEP,

Thinking "Pole Barn"

BUT - ASKING for ANY IDEAS! This is my FIRST time and PROBABLY my LAST time all in one shot. I'm 57 at this point - SO - I'd like to get it as "Right as Possible"!!!!!
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Old 01-01-2013, 11:07 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by arcanum View Post
I can almost guarantee you that a car lift is cheaper than putting in an oil change pitve
If you do put in a car lift, excavate deeper to pour a thicker slab where the lift columns sit. I would even add some steel reinforcing under the columns as well
Yes definitely doing a lift - IF - I've got any $$$ left.

THANKS!
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:47 PM   #28
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Yes definitely doing a lift - IF - I've got any $$$ left.

THANKS!
Watch for used lifts. I passed on one at an auction. 9000 lb off brand, went for $900. I just installed a Dannmar 11,000 lb two post. A mechanic in town was closing shop. It was 14 months old and I gave $1800. He paid $2500 new. The deals are out there, keep your ears open
Already came in handy, hung a deer from it for skinning! (also pulled the drriveshaft on my 1/2 ton!)

Try to plan where it will be located before pouring the floor. Most 2 posts want a minimum thickness of 4.5" concrete at 3000 psi. As suggested earlier, a bit of extra depth where the pillars will be can make it easier. Many will go overkill with 12" footer with rebar or wire. Just make sure there are no cracks or expansion cuts under the pillars. LEVEL and FLAT are critical!

My posts are about 12' tall, so keep that in mind when planning the building.
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:59 PM   #29
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I'm getting ready to put a Monitor style pole barn in this spring. I have looked at Hansen pole buildings due to the fact that my Dad has a Direct buy discount (10%), but am also looking for companies that build it for you. Hansen will do a kit for around 17,000 that is dropped off at your site(32x32 with a 10 foot door in the middle bay and an upstairs with a 8' ceiling). If any one has any Colorado companies they cou;d recommend, that would be awesome...
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:06 PM   #30
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As you are talking about the building 1st , then buy the lift-you better be careful with ceiling clearances as IF? you don't know the lift brand,size,etc., then you lack necessary information. Also matters if will be lifting a PU vs. a sedan. As to DIY, I see the practicality of paying a crew but for me the fact we live on teacher retirement checks & spent much income raising 3 sons , DIY makes other things possible, such as travel,expensive hobbies like MC's,etc.. No matter who builds it you are the user & it has to fit your needs such as the lift question I raised. The concrete floor also needs to be considered for certain lift types.
Some Ag schools have websites with various agricultural building plans. Your county ag agent may have access to some too. Box stores have books with plans but they are out there for free. I did a long truss for the front edge of my sawmill shed to enable long log entry way & I easily found truss designs on the web. I used resorcinol glue and nailed the chip board braces to the material. I live in an area of low labor costs & several truss builders here so they are economical that way too. If you have a tractor for the posts and hire a couple of laborers it's easy to place the posts in one day & frame them in a 2nd day then metal siding in another day. You can but the materials for very close to the same price as a build crew. As for getting it right you see you are the decider on the specs for your purpose anyway-have at it! If you don't have to count your money as we do-get it built & play with your time rather than work. I trade work with a neighbor-I sawed him from my logs an old fashioned corn crib pattern in trade for him helping me saw my logs.
This spring I'm building a free standing carport which will be a pole bldg. I'll use 4x6 treated poles which may not meet code where you live but work fine & save me $$$.
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