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Old 01-02-2013, 03:35 PM   #46
johnny80s
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So many imaginative ways of getting off an oil filter. Interesting thread.
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:38 PM   #47
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I knew I liked Whale Rider...His idea is similar to mine, mine would work on an 1100 or 1150 and a 1200. WRs will only work on the 1200.

Get up to the threaded plate and use the outer holes as a grip point....done. Easy on the 1200 compared to an 11x0.
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:45 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by johnny80s View Post
So many imaginative ways of getting off an oil filter. Interesting thread.
The way to get it off...is to do it right the first time with the right filter wrench that is FULLY seated on the filter and on a fliter that was lightly oiled on the seal when installed originally....done

Fiddling around with universal fit and ponding holes in them and channel locks or making a custom insert tool.....that is LAST resort stuff.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:48 PM   #49
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Chisel

It should not be too difficult. If the filter is now damaged then the tools may make it worse.
I would go with the earlier suggestion to use a chisel. Use one with a narrow end. Dare I say it... "a screw driver".
Well, one you don't care too much about anyway.

Aim at the thick ridge running around the base of the filter where it sits against the engine block. This is not the sealing surface so there is no great risk. First aim towards the centre to make a good dent. Then tap against that in order to turn the filter. Firm controlled hits.

So... using your picture as a guide. You are trying to get the outside edge, nearest you, to move towards the front of the bike. ((Looking at the left hand side.)

For my R1200GS I purchased one of the special tools. Only a few dollars on ebay. As you said, the 1200 filter is not easy to get at with other tools.

p.s. On my f800 the filter is easy to get at. Chisel and hammer to loosen it. (Never went near the engine block) Just a slight tap. Put the new one on by hand.

Kiwi Tinkerer screwed with this post 01-02-2013 at 05:49 PM Reason: spelling
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Old 01-02-2013, 08:41 PM   #50
hillbillypolack
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Christ, guys. This isn't quantum physics. If you spent that much money on a bike, get the tools to maintain it. They aren't that expensive.

Hearing 'chisel', 'sandpaper' and sheetmetal screws used in an oil change tells me there are a few here who shouldn't be changing their own oil in the first place.
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Old 01-02-2013, 08:56 PM   #51
ragtoplvr
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Now the job has went south. The oil filter is mangled. Your proper tool, is too late to the party. Where were you when he needed you. The only way this is going to come apart is hammer, chisel, screws. Shit has happened. advice to close the barn door after the horses are out is not helpful.

Warning, the sump is thin aluminum, if you miss you can drive a screwdriver right thru the sump. It has happened.

Have at it, learn to prefill the filter, and oil the gasket, and about 1/2 to 2/3 turn after gasket just touches, and you will never have this problem again.

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Old 01-02-2013, 09:14 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by LaurelPerryOnLand View Post
With all that effort....are you sure:

You're TURNING in the correct direction?

Left to loosey...Right to tightee?

Otherwise...never mind.

Slight distraction here,

A fellow I went to high school with had a hard time removing the oil drain plug on his car. Wrench didn't provide enough leverage, so on to the ratchet, then the bigger ratchet, then the 3/4 drive breaker bar. His father had plenty of tools to choose from.

Well that plug came out with a nice size chunk of the oil pan. Poor guy had a hard time living this one down after a history of other major errors. He was stronger than most of his classmates at the time, just not very bright when it came to mechanical theory.


He went on to make good for himself and the community. Others do all mechanical work for him now.
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:25 PM   #53
Gezerbike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murkidi View Post
take it to the dealer and pay for the removal of the oil filter, waranty wont cover that we mess around with the bike the oil and filter change are supost to be done by the dealer untill the waranty is over, but at this point is safer that take it to the dealer to avoid any damage.

as a mechanic from the dealer here in venezuela once said to me, that they love people like us that we do every thing to our bikes beacause from time to time we mess up something and then we end up at the dealer feeling shame of what we did and spending money at their shops


manuel....

Yep, I think you are at that point. Nothing personel, but with everything mangled by you in your attempts to remove this, do you really feel confident at this point to get it off without doing real damage that you, and your wallet, might regret for some time to come ? A lot of the advise you have recieved here might be good, but it sounds as if you are past the point of using most of it. Discretion is the better part of valour................
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:32 PM   #54
Kyle B
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I am the hammer man!

A chisel on the flange below the rubber seal will remove the filter. The impact is the trick.
Torque an oil filter? You don't even have to oil the rubber gasket. The aluminum flange will have enough residue for lubrication. Put the new filter on. Turn to contact point. turn an additional 1/2 to 2/3 turn.Run your Amsoil for 5000 miles. Repeat above steps.
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:32 PM   #55
VEGASGSA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillbillypolack View Post
Christ, guys. This isn't quantum physics. If you spent that much money on a bike, get the tools to maintain it. They aren't that expensive.

Hearing 'chisel', 'sandpaper' and sheetmetal screws used in an oil change tells me there are a few here who shouldn't be changing their own oil in the first place.
The problem, is the filter is already mangled, so, it has to get creative now, the correct FUCKING WRENCH WON'T FIT NOW....so, all bets are off and he needs help getting a mangled filter off.

Please post a pic of the WRENCH, you would use with said filter...

Thank You..
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:08 PM   #56
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Gasket removal

After you get the filter off, be sure ALL of the old gasket is removed so the new one has a smooth surface with which to seal.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:16 PM   #57
johnny80s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillbillypolack View Post
Christ, guys. This isn't quantum physics. If you spent that much money on a bike, get the tools to maintain it. They aren't that expensive.

Hearing 'chisel', 'sandpaper' and sheetmetal screws used in an oil change tells me there are a few here who shouldn't be changing their own oil in the first place.
Stir
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:27 PM   #58
def
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It appears that we are at the point of "No special oil filter tool is going to help so it is time for brute force with hammers, punches, chisels and the like".

Remove all the filter internals to expose the filter base plate and apply hammer/chisel blows (caution, not too hard with the hammer inasmuch as you are applying force to the threaded oil filter stub which is secured in the alloy crankcase) to the holes in the filter base plate. It will come off. Use caution as mentioned by a previous poster so as not to perforate the crankcase.

Keep us posted.

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Old 01-02-2013, 11:33 PM   #59
LaurelPerryOnLand
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Last resort approach...

1. Mount a milk crate securely to your garage floor.
2. Mount your VISE to the top of the milk crate.
2A. Position your bike over the milk crate.
3. Grab your OIL FILTER with the VISE.
4. ROTATE the BIKE...several turns.
4A. FILTER is now off.
5. REVERSE process for install.

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 01-02-2013 at 11:44 PM
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:49 AM   #60
Chat Lunatique
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle B View Post
You don't even have to oil the rubber gasket. The aluminum flange will have enough residue for lubrication..

If one takes the time to PROPERLY clean the mounting face of all grit and oil, there is no residue. Any drips of oil will be in one spot and not spread evenly on the flange face.

If it worked for you Kyle, you got lucky.
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