ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Trials
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-11-2015, 10:45 AM   #1
motobene OP
Motoing for 44 years
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Mountains SW Oklahoma
Oddometer: 1,386
Flat Prevention With Slime

Had a kind gentleman thank me last weekend for the tip on oiling squealing fan motors. here's another set of tips, this time regarding flats and spoke nipple corrosion abatement.

I saw a number of flats at last week's event. We rode over a lot of large prickly pear cacti that were flattened onto new sections of trail. They were covered with robust, long spikes. There were also mesquite tree thorns here and there. I tried diligently to miss them, but came back with a number of thorns in my tires, but zero loss of pressure.

I avoid slow-leak-type flats by putting tubeless tire sealer in all my tires. I buy the product called Slime. It's green, made up of something like fiberglass fibers in antifreeze. I buy it by the gallon because I have so many tires on the ranch. I follow their recommendation on number of pumps of stuff by tire size.

What this stuff does is plug all slow leaks right when they happen. The stuff will even seal leaky plugs in flexing sidewalls.

Front trials tires have tubes, but the tubeless stuff works well there too. If you get a really big thorn in a front tire, sometimes it can go flat fast when you hit the thorn just so, then when you pump the tire back up it will hold air (scratch head). It holds air because the thorn will sometimes conveniently re insert itself into the original thorn hole! If that mystery happens to you, check for thorns inside your tire carcass, by feel, when remove it to patch the tube.

I also seal my rims and spoke nipples during bike setup with clear spray lacquer, before I slime the rear tire or front tube. Newer-type rims with spoke nuts mid way in the spokes do not use sealing bands and do not have nipples covered by the band in the rim, so there are no trapped nipple heads to corrode. In those cases I'll still spray the rim to prevent corrosion if the rim anodize gets a ding.

Some of the sealing-band rear wheels seal very well, but a few will leak. You'll get those irritating slow leaks. Yes, you can address that with slime, but I'd rather not have a leaky band or valve stem in a band, so I remove the tire and the valve stem and sealing band. I clean any rim and spoke-nipple corrosion with a wire wheel, then clear spray lacquer rim and spoke nipple ends to soaking.

I let the lacquer dry a about 10 minutes, then reinstall the band with clear silicone 1 sealant between the band edges and the extruded track way for the rubber sealing band. I run a thin bead in the track way outer edge, then coat the bad edges with silicone rubber. I re insert the band quickly so the silicone does not skin over. I start at the valve stem hole to get it very close to lining up, then fit the whole band and push the edges in then smooth the silicone, wiping off excess. You should have a thin-smooth sealed line all around. The silicone will float the band a bit and be lubricated just as you insert it, so you can line the band and rim valve stem holes up by moving the band a bit with thumb pressure. You can't move it far, so it's important to start up lined up well.

I then re insert the valve stem, sealing every interface, but barely snug the nut until the silicone cures completely. That's about 3 hours. If you final tighten before cure the pressure will squoze out the rubber band. Don't mongo tighten the stem nut.

Doing the above things get you corrosion-free rims and pretty much never any flats. unless you split a sidewall. So far, no flats for me in competition, and it's been a lot of years....

motobene screwed with this post 03-11-2015 at 10:55 AM
motobene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 12:06 PM   #2
mung
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Idaho
Oddometer: 606
If you do get a flat with the green stuff in there, there is no way a plug or patch will ever stick. But if it has never gone flat the way you have it setup you are a lucky man.
mung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 02:24 PM   #3
mefadv
Studly Adventurer
 
mefadv's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Wickenburg AZ
Oddometer: 824
I have used "Slime" for years in tubed and tubeless tires of assorted varieties. It has made a firm believer out-of-me several times.

I always have a extra tube with me and if there would be a unstoppable leak it could easily be exchanged. As... Yes, it can be very hard to patch a tube after using sealants. However repairs can be done once your back at your shop with access to a wire brush.
__________________
Mark, a Misplaced Farm Boy....
XR400, plated
TL250, plated
mefadv is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 04:23 PM   #4
DerViking
Shred
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Black Bill Park
Oddometer: 344
I have had ok luck both patching and plugging slime tires. You do have to clean as well as possible, and I use extra glue. Slime does tend to dry out, though not as much as other products like stans no tubes.
__________________
ATGATT: When you fall off your motorcycle, you will be wearing what you were when you got on your motorcycle. Dress accordingly.
DerViking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 04:42 PM   #5
Brewtus
Buffoonery, Inc.
 
Brewtus's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Albuquerque, not New, not Mexico.......
Oddometer: 3,056
Now for the Dark Side of Scum. Slime. Whatever.

It will horribly corrode and pit both steel and alloy wheels in tubeless applications. Yes, it is a great way to prevent needle flats, but leave it in the wheel/tire for any length of time without checking it, you WILL be sorry. I run a bit of it in tube tires, never tubeless for that reason.

Also if you farm out the tire changes on your scoot, please inform the poor slob that is about to change the tire that you have "Scummed" (Slimed, whatever) it, so he/she will be ready for the explosion of green crap when the bead is popped. Trust me, it puts techs in a

Very

Bad

Mood

when they get an unexpected blast of green crap all over the place when changing a tire.

Just sayin'.
__________________
Work hard. Play hard.
Team Dead End. The drinking team with a Trials problem.
2-Time winner of the coveted "Best Shenanigans" award at Capt. Rick's annual BBQ.

Brewtus screwed with this post 03-11-2015 at 06:08 PM
Brewtus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 07:32 PM   #6
no2tracks
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Location: Co. Springs
Oddometer: 246
I use Stans no tubes sealant in my tires. It won't corrode the metal , seals all the cacti holes I've ever gotten and I even didn't have to air up every event. Only downside is it needs more every 6 months or so. When it dries out, it's like a latex glove coating the inside of the tire/tube.
__________________
BRC, COHVCO, USA-ALL
'03 300 exc
'09 Sherco 2.9R
no2tracks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 07:36 PM   #7
lineaway
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: nm
Oddometer: 2,856
Use slime in ATV tires, no need in a trials tire. My language when slime blows all over my tire machine includes what I`d like to do to the hood of your truck. Not a pretty moment in my day. Now the funny part of slime is what it does to your pressure gauge. Carry a few co2 cartridges, that will get you around the loop.
It is sad that Ray did not get the loop cleaned up of all that cactus, I would have gladly cleaned it up while I was there working on the sections.
__________________
Relentless hard on to remove the all day dab.
lineaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 10:01 PM   #8
motobene OP
Motoing for 44 years
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Mountains SW Oklahoma
Oddometer: 1,386
The only rims I have ever seen with runaway corrosion were the mid-80s TY 250/350 rims. They were tube type. They'd corrode deeply.. scary deep. I have seen some corrosion on more modern wheels, bu once the gold anodize was breached.

I have found the front tire where moisture gets trapped between tube and rim to be the worst. The zinc chromate plating on the spokes goes first, then you get some corrosion on the rims near that mess. The lacquer trick solves this if you get there before it happens, and it can arrest corrosion afterward.

Corrosion issues with slime never even occurred to me. I suppose it's possible. Then again, I do the lacquer trick

Plugs? and slime? I have slime in ATV tires where I've had to put in many plugs due to large thorns and stobs puncturing things. Maybe using gobs of glue to insert the plugs helped? Maybe I should lacquer my plugs!
motobene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2015, 10:01 PM   #9
motobene OP
Motoing for 44 years
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Mountains SW Oklahoma
Oddometer: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by lineaway View Post
Use slime in ATV tires, no need in a trials tire. My language when slime blows all over my tire machine includes what I`d like to do to the hood of your truck. Not a pretty moment in my day. Now the funny part of slime is what it does to your pressure gauge. Carry a few co2 cartridges, that will get you around the loop.
It is sad that Ray did not get the loop cleaned up of all that cactus, I would have gladly cleaned it up while I was there working on the sections.
You have a tire machine?
motobene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 04:30 AM   #10
lineaway
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: nm
Oddometer: 2,856
I used to change tires at events. Air compressor with my motor home. Glad those days are over. Trials was not near as much fun. I actually enjoy the events more now watching my son. I seldom ride, but I still get a big grin when I do . Funny you mention a ty mono rim, I am shipping one off today from an flea bay sale.
__________________
Relentless hard on to remove the all day dab.
lineaway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 05:33 AM   #11
laser17
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Boston,Massachusetts
Oddometer: 847
Quote:
Originally Posted by no2tracks View Post
I use Stans no tubes sealant in my tires. It won't corrode the metal , seals all the cacti holes I've ever gotten and I even didn't have to air up every event. Only downside is it needs more every 6 months or so. When it dries out, it's like a latex glove coating the inside of the tire/tube.
All my tubeless Mt Bike buddies swear by Stans - no tubes. Good stuff.
laser17 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 05:42 AM   #12
slicktop
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2013
Location: Slicktop Mtn. Ar.
Oddometer: 235
I wouldn't mind slime in tubes, but not in a tubeless mc tire.
I'm surprised that slime would be advised for a trials tire except in an emergency.
I have purchased the Tubliss run-flat tubes. They seal the bead of the tire to the rim with an inflatable bladder, allowing the tire to be used even at 0 psi. (punctured)
The weight difference between a tire with Tubliss and a tire filled with slime would be near the same but slime moves around.
Tubliss will cost about $100 per tire. Slime cost about $5. So there is that to consider as well.
slicktop is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 07:03 AM   #13
motobene OP
Motoing for 44 years
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Mountains SW Oklahoma
Oddometer: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by slicktop View Post
I wouldn't mind slime in tubes, but not in a tubeless mc tire.
I'm surprised that slime would be advised for a trials tire except in an emergency.
I have purchased the Tubliss run-flat tubes. They seal the bead of the tire to the rim with an inflatable bladder, allowing the tire to be used even at 0 psi. (punctured)
The weight difference between a tire with Tubliss and a tire filled with slime would be near the same but slime moves around.
Tubliss will cost about $100 per tire. Slime cost about $5. So there is that to consider as well.
I could see you doing a detailed Tubliss thread with pix. Expensive but fascinating.
motobene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 07:16 AM   #14
motobene OP
Motoing for 44 years
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita Mountains SW Oklahoma
Oddometer: 1,386
I have talked with a number of people over the years who lurk and do not originate posts, and they rarely - if ever - reply. The reason they most often give is fear of criticism.

I don't have that fear. I am, amazed, however, at the number of negative responses that pop up when tips are given. "I would never do X", with conviction, and often without the evidence as strong as the stated concern.

That's just fine with me, as I like free exchange of ideas, but I believe this keep the lurkers deeply in the bushes.

I suppose I am guilty of my own type of perceived criticism by providing a defence of ideas. Sigh... Can't win.
motobene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2015, 07:30 AM   #15
Dan Diego
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: San Diego, CA
Oddometer: 911
I appreciate your input, Motobene.
__________________
There are two rules for being successful in life.

Rule 1: Never tell others everything you know.

Triumph Rocket III Touring, KTM 990 ADV
Dan Diego is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015