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Old 02-02-2013, 11:54 PM   #46
huzar OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
Yup, I see that.

Does Peru Motors allow the bike to leave the country?
I had notarized paperwork from them authorizing me to take the bike out of the country. Apparently it is impossible to take a rental directly to Bolivia via Copacabana, but that it is doable by taking it to Chile first via Tacna-Arrica, and then from there into Bolivia. In the end I did not attempt this, as I did not have the time. Bolivia will have to happen some other time (maybe when I can get that XR650R rental )
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:20 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by huzar View Post
I had notarized paperwork from them authorizing me to take the bike out of the country. Apparently it is impossible to take a rental directly to Bolivia via Copacabana, but that it is doable by taking it to Chile first via Tacna-Arrica, and then from there into Bolivia. In the end I did not attempt this, as I did not have the time. Bolivia will have to happen some other time (maybe when I can get that XR650R rental )

That is exactly the info I was after!!


I don't know about two full size people on a KLR though.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:51 AM   #48
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She's fearless, adventurous, an amazing cook, and rides motorcycles... quite an amazing catch for a guy like me
Good things happen to good people.

Really digging the last batch of photos.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:01 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
That is exactly the info I was after!!


I don't know about two full size people on a KLR though.
The closure of Copacabana to rental bikes is apparently a recent thing. May change back at some point.

I encountered people who expressed disbelief at even Tacna-Arrica being an option. Apparently bikes crossing borders without their owners is something that is in constant flux down there. The good thing is that Peru Motors will try and work with you on this. Some renters will not allow this.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:07 PM   #50
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Friday, January 25th, 2013 – Exploring Late Titicaca

I’ve been wanting to come here to the lake and see its islands for a while. The floating islands of the Uros especially held a strong interest for me. Last night we had made arrangements for a tour of the floating islands and the Isla Taquile through an outfit here in Puno. They picked us up from our hotel at 7am, and took us to the dock. There we boarded a tourist boat. The itinerary would be the floating islands of Uros first, then about a two and half hour run to Isla Taquile, lunch and walking around there, and then a three hour cruise back to Puno.

Our captain Amadeo and our guide, Guido:

Porwit-20130125-0618-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Entering Uros:

Porwit-20130125-0620-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The floating island of Uros is a bit of a disappointment. The place feels way too touristy – like the people don’t even live here, they just come here to do the demo for the tourists, sell them some trinkets, and move on. Also, the islands are really no longer Uros. Rather, they are Aymara, as the Uros have intermarried themselves into extinction as a tribe. Nevertheless, there are some interesting tidbits about how the floating islands themselves are made, and the many uses of the totora reed that grows abundantly in this part of the lake. Of a total of about 60 floating islands, about 40 choose to participate in tourism.

Most everything here is made from totoro reeds:

Porwit-20130125-0624-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The welcoming committee on our island:

Porwit-20130125-0626-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

An explanation of how the island is built -- the thick, floating mats of roots are harvested by means of a saw, then totoro is laid down upon that, and finally huts and other structures are built on top of that:

Porwit-20130125-0635-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Women in local garb:

Porwit-20130125-0641-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Hewby goes native:

Porwit-20130125-0647-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

They have little gardens and chicken coops on these islands as well:

Porwit-20130125-0650-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Kids amusing themselves by jumping from the tower of a reed boat onto the reed island below:

Porwit-20130125-0671-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The trip to Isla Taquile is long, and we sleep most of the way there. Upon our arrival on the island, we’re given a bit of a history and culture lesson by our guide, and then marched up the hill. Man, walking uphill at fourteen thousand feet sucks – how did I ever get up Rainier? About two thousand Quechua speakers populate the island. It is a UNESCO site, and they appear to run themselves with a fair bit of autonomy. It used to be a prison for many years, but was handed back to the native people in the 70's. The men concern themselves with knitting – they make hats, satchels, belts, and skirts for their wives and daughters to wear, etc. The women make yarn and weave. We ate lunch, and walked up to the plaza and then across the island to another harbor, where the boat picked us up. The vibe on Isla Taquile was more to my liking – while tourism was clearly a part of the fabric, it didn’t feel like a performance put on for the benefit of tourists.

The path up from the entrance harbor:

Porwit-20130125-0677-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Ever-present terraces:

Porwit-20130125-0687-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Local women selling crafts:

Porwit-20130125-0686-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The plaza, with an entrance arch:

Porwit-20130125-0690-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The plaza is high up on the hill, with a great view of the surroundings:

Porwit-20130125-0694-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Potatoes in bloom:

Porwit-20130125-0696-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

More terraces. Don't these people get tired of building them?

Porwit-20130125-0701-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The exit arch:

Porwit-20130125-0705-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We had another three-hour ride back to Puno. I hung out on the roof deck for most of the way, taking in the sights. On the way back, we went past the floating islands again, as we were dropping off two passengers who had chosed to spend the night on one of the islands. The horizon was black as we approached, and it looked like we would soon get a soaking.

It got a little chilly on the ride back:

Porwit-20130125-0715-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The darkening horizon:

Porwit-20130125-0719-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The tourist exhibits have been put away for the day and wrapped up to face the storm:

Porwit-20130125-0726-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Local runabout:

Porwit-20130125-0751-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Cool door on the cathedral in Puno:

Porwit-20130125-0759-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Nice knocker:

Porwit-20130125-0761-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

A heavily-armed police assault squad, with broken-down truck:

Porwit-20130125-0763-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:24 PM   #51
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Saturday, January 26th, 2013 – Puno to Chivay

We got a late start today. After wrangling with the folks at the El Inti Hostel, who tried to jack up the rates from 40S/night to 60S/night, we were stopped by the police on the way out of town. Documents check. Mine went smoothly, but they seemed to give Hewby a bit of grief. After they finally waved us through, we went looking for gas, and dealt with the tire pressures on the bikes. I think it was noon by the time we were really moving.

I don't think the weather will be kind to us today:

Porwit-20130126-0767-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Cool enclosed stone households near Atuncalla:

Porwit-20130126-0769-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Google maps routes us on a road that does not have us go back through Juliaca. Hurray. Instead, we head towards Sillustani and Atuncalla. There we pick up a nice dirt road that heads west. After about seven km of nice dirt, we are routed onto a much less pleasant dirt track. Several large storm clouds circle nearby, and we are hit by rain and hail a few times. The dirt track becomes very muddy. Hewby can’t keep the bike up a couple of times, and once or twice I have to ride her GS through the slick stuff. I nearly biff it on the KLR, as the rear does not want to stay in line. I think it took us about two hours to cover those few miles. We finally get into a little town, where we’re told the piste to Arequipa is just over there. Another couple of miles of dirt, and we’re on pavement. Hmmm, maybe going through the center of Juliaca would have been a better option.

Pretty nice dirt, though the rain isn't far off:

Porwit-20130126-0771-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

More nice dirt:

Porwit-20130126-0774-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Decidedly less nice dirt:

Porwit-20130126-0778-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Wet, yucky, tracked-out slicker-than-snot mud:

Porwit-20130126-0780-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Something about artificial insemination:

Porwit-20130126-0781-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Hewby is determined to get through this muck:

Porwit-20130126-0782-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Nearing the end of the mud:

Porwit-20130126-0783-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We roll into a little town and get lunch. It is 3pm by now. We walk into a little restaurant and order two of what they’re serving. The soup is some not so tasty chicken noodle whatever that feels like it has been reheated day after day. The second course is a pile of rice, a potato, and a tiny piece of meat. I will be regretting that lunch the rest of the day, as it keeps trying to come back out the way it came.

Hewby's like: "Seriously, you're going to take my picture now?"

Porwit-20130126-0785-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Funky church:

Porwit-20130126-0786-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We’re moving again before 4pm. The road is nice, but climbs relentlessly. We emerge onto the altiplano at 14,600 feet, and are greeted by wind, rain, hail, and finally snow. Hewby is freezing, and stops to put on all the clothing she has. I suffer in silence in my t-shirt and riding jacket. We press on to the southwest, looking for a turnoff to Chivay. I didn’t see one in Intapa, so we continue towards Arequipa. I’m cranky, and just want a warm shower and bed, no longer caring if I ride the Colca canyon. The road goes through a preserve, and I see some vicunas in the distance, but none want to come close enough to be photographed.

Lagunas on the altiplano:

Porwit-20130126-0787-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Vicuna crossing:

Porwit-20130126-0788-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Volcanic and rocky snow-covered peaks emerge as we continue west. If it weren’t so damn cold, I might be enjoying this more. The road finally starts to drop a little. At 13K it is almost balmy, and my mood improves. We come to a fork in the road. We can continue down towards Arequipa, or take the road up to Chivay. After a short discussion, Hewby convinces me that I will regret it tomorrow if I do not ride the Colca river canyon, since this was one of the main points of my trip. We head up into the hills. It is 6:20pm, and we’re racing against the sunset.

It's wet, late, and we're heading towards snow-covered peaks:

Porwit-20130126-0789-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Volcan Minas and some snow-covered peaks:

Porwit-20130126-0790-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Alpenglow as we turn towards Chivay, 50+ miles to go:

Porwit-20130126-0792-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The road climbs again, up to 14.6, then higher still. The light fades. The ride could be quite spectacular, if it weren’t for the impending darkness, the cold, and the return of snow flurries. We cross the pass at 16K feet, being snowed on. The light is gone – only the faint headlights of the KLR and the GS pierce the darkness. The road has occasional potholes, and slide debris from mudflows that have been cleaned away recently. We also worry about black ice and stray llamas. As we start the descent, Hewby spies the lights of Chivay in the distance. The GPS shows a long, twisty drop into town. We ride carefully, as the crap on the road keeps us on our toes. At one point we go through a thick fog bank, with visibility reduced to nearly zero. Especially on segments that have been covered by mud slides, the reflective road markers are gone and there are a couple of moments of crap, where’s the road?
We roll into town a little before 8pm, having covered 85km since the intersection. All in all, we did nearly 300km, some of it in pretty challenging conditions. What was supposed to have been an easy day did not turn out that way.

We’re now back at a more manageable elevation of twelve thousand feet. The Lonely Planet guide recommended the Colca Inn as one of the places to stay, and we are not disappointed. Ample hot water, a super-friendly guy at the reception desk, secure parking, and (this is a first for me in Peru) a heater in the room. Hallelujah! We crank up the heat and shower to rewarm ourselves, and then head in search of food. We find someplace on the main plaza, but it wasn’t very good. Still, it was warm, and they were open and willing to feed us after 9pm. Back in the room, I search in vain for wifi. I’ll have to upload this another time.

Tomorrow, we ride down the Colca Canyon to Arequipa. The canyon is a good spot to see the Andean condor, so I have my hopes up.
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Old 02-05-2013, 06:31 PM   #52
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Sunday, January 27th, 2013 – Chivay to Arequipa

We wake to a gorgeous, sunny day in Chivay. After breakfast, we wander the town for a bit. It has a promenade that is lined with these funky statues, as if it were aspiring to something grander than it currently is. It also has a very cool old church, and an excellent market. We check out some fruits that Hewby has never seen before, and we stop in for a jugo. We try two – one made from kewicha, which, as near as we can tell, is a smaller relative of quinoa, and one made from quinoa, with sugar, cinnamon, and pureed apple. Delicious.

One of the statues:

Porwit-20130127-0802-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

And another:

Porwit-20130127-0805-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

They even have a gimp?

Porwit-20130127-0808-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Hewby is discussing quinoa recipes and agrarian policy:

Porwit-20130127-0824-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Hewby is in her element at the market:

Porwit-20130127-0828-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The town church, with snow-capped mountains:

Porwit-20130127-0847-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Having sampled the town, we hit the road. The road is mostly dirt, and leads down from Chivay to the Cruz del Condor. It is pretty nice, if slightly dusty riding. The valley to our right is verdant, the fields in bloom, and we have snow-capped peaks towering overhead. There is a little traffic, but nothing too heavy.

Fields in bloom:

Porwit-20130127-0849-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

At this point, the Rio Colca canyon is more of a lush valley:

Porwit-20130127-0850-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr


Porwit-20130127-0851-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Stone walls carve up the valley floor:

Porwit-20130127-0854-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

View point along the way:

Porwit-20130127-0855-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

One of several tunnels along the way:

Porwit-20130127-0858-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We’re told that the Cruz del Condor is a reliable spot to see these giant birds, and we are not disappointed. We see two, and one puts on a very nice display for us. Hopefully Hewby got some good pictures. We are still at above twelve thousand feet, and the wide valley from earlier has now become a narrow, steep canyon where the Rio Colca rages thousands of feet below us. Of course, to get to the Cruz del Condor, the Peruvians charge us 70 soles per person just to ride the road down there. That’s more expensive than admission to Yosemite.

The Rio Colca is now raging whitewater, deep at the bottom of a canyon:

Porwit-20130127-0864-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

A condor. Hewby got better pics of this, and I'll post up a link once she uploads them:

Porwit-20130127-0868-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We continue on past the Cruz del Condor, to Cabanaconde. The road here is paved. Right before town, we pick up a dirt road that heads south, towards Huambo. We’re once again on a pretty good dirt road, which we now have to ourselves. The roadside markers inform us that we have 100 miles of this before the roads terminates at the Panamericana, in the town of El Alto.
We stay high, climbing at times to over fourteen thousand feet. The views are amazing, with wide valles, snow-covered peaks, streams, and red dirt. There are herds of cows grazing here and there, but no other signs of human life. This section of the road is probably the best road I have ever ridden, anywhere. At times slow and twisty, at other times fast, the road thrills us turn after turn. Portions of the road have muddy ruts that have since set up in the sun, and there’s washboard here and there, but otherwise the surface is very good. There is no one else on it. All of the tourist traffic into Chivay comes the way we came the night before.

The old church in Cabanaconde:

Porwit-20130127-0869-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Great riding:

Porwit-20130127-0870-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Amazing views and great weather:

Porwit-20130127-0871-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Looks a bit like the Great Basin, doesn't it?

Porwit-20130127-0872-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

High desert riding at 14 thousand feet:

Porwit-20130127-0873-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

The dried-out mud ruts occasionally demanded a bit of caution:

Porwit-20130127-0874-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Wide, grassy valleys:

Untitled by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Chasing Hewby with my visor open means a facefull of dust:

Porwit-20130127-0877-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Probably the best day of riding I have ever had in my life:

Porwit-20130127-0879-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Not a soul in sight for hours:

Porwit-20130127-0880-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

Shanty town in the desert, just outside of El Alto:

Porwit-20130127-0881-Orig by Marcin Porwit, on Flickr

We have four hours of glorious dirt riding. I really cannot capture just how amazing this road was. It finally starts to drop with about 25 miles remaining, the environment changing, becoming more desert-like. We drop to less than four thousand feet by the time we reach El Alto. The last few miles were on straight, boring washboard, which passes though poor slums.
Once on the Panamericana, we haul mail back to Arequipa, arriving a little before 7pm. We’ve been hurrying, because I’ve made reservations at Chicha, a restaurant run by Gaston Acurio, who is a culinary god. We get there, only to find out that the restaurant is closed. Their reservation system let me made a reservation for a non-existent time. Bastards! Oh well, we’ll have to go back there for lunch tomorrow, before I catch my flight back to Seattle.
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Old 02-05-2013, 06:40 PM   #53
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This brings me to the end of my Peruvian excursion.

We wound up going to Chi Cha the next day for lunch, and found it underwhelming and overpriced. I flew back home to Seattle out of Arequipa that evening, while Hewby stayed another couple of days to have some bike work (rather poorly) done before heading on to Bolivia.

The trip was a mixed bag for me. Amazing riding, some great food and some really friendly people, fascinating ruins and culture. On the flip side, dishonest hostel owners, exorbitant fees set up to fleece tourists, and the occasionally trying weather conditions on the Altiplano. Add more than a dash of frustration at my crappy Spanish, which allowed me neither the ability to praise what I enjoyed nor criticize what I disliked.

On balance, I'd definitely do it again. I think I just need to brush up on my Spanish, and next time come for longer

Thanks for reading
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:05 PM   #54
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Thanks for the great pictures and the effort to do the RR ; I enjoyed it big time !!
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:11 PM   #55
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Thanks for the great pictures and the effort to do the RR ; I enjoyed it big time !!
Thanks Julio. Having heard so much about you from Deb, Sara and Dan, and others, I look forward to one day seeing Guatemala for myself and meeting you in person.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:31 AM   #56
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Not a soul in sight for hours
Nice road; kinda worth the big price afterall, eh?
There are no forests there, like in the PNW?
The scenery in those deep valleys, and being on top of the world above them....sweet.
May your memories last until you return!!!
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:39 AM   #57
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Great ride.
Really enjoyed the read and pictures.

It must have been tough to leave.
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Old 02-06-2013, 08:38 AM   #58
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Excellent report!!


Really like this one, it's just 'right'.


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Old 02-06-2013, 08:40 AM   #59
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It must have been tough to leave.
I have to say, at the end I was looking forward to it being over for a bit. I let the negative aspects of the trip, mentioned above, get to me a bit -- the negotiations with lying hostel owners, the "you're rich, so we'll charge you more" attitude -- those ruined Peru for me a little. Maybe I need to travel more and build up a thicker skin to those things?
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:24 AM   #60
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I have to say, at the end I was looking forward to it being over for a bit. I let the negative aspects of the trip, mentioned above, get to me a bit -- the negotiations with lying hostel owners, the "you're rich, so we'll charge you more" attitude -- those ruined Peru for me a little. Maybe I need to travel more and build up a thicker skin to those things?
Marcin
I really enjoyed your report and photos since I can't be there at the moment its the next best thing,Thank You!
Now don't take this the wrong way but no matter what our station in life is here in Canada and The States if you can afford to fly and rent a bike in peru you are rich ..... compared to them. You need a little more spanish and you will mostly avoid the rip offs.
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