ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Some Assembly Required
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-24-2013, 03:24 PM   #16
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Cool2 Fiberglass, UGH!

Thanks for the link!
I will contact a distributor and find out what minimum orders they require.

I agree that having a bolt break while riding along would be unacceptable!
The wire harness will be going through the front of it under the seat so it will act as a tether to some degree.
But I don't want to find out how much it will do.

On with the fun!
Or rather, the no fun part of the build.

Fiberglass (should be a four letter word I think)

I needed to figure out how to make the bottom of the tank and attach it to the tank shell and to the tunnel.
The way I did it is not the way to do it I now know.

First I created the bottom by glassing one side at a time to the shell, and then when it hardened to do the same on the other side after trimming the first side. I did it in 4 stages, two on each side to join the tunnel to the shell


Did I mention making the mold by gluing layers of 2" blue board foam insulation together?
I cut and sanded, cut and sanded, to get the shape I wanted and then waxed it up and layered cloth and epoxy on it.

The tunnel I made right on the bike by draping wet cloth over the backbone (with a thick towel and plastic sheet over it) I didn't take pictures of the actual glassing because it is so messy and I didn't want to throw gloves away to take pictures and then put new gloves on. Not difficult to work with fiberglass but is sure is messy! And the cutting/grinding of it is terrible! my arms break out with red spots like I have a disease. I have worked with it some over the years and the irritation has gotten much worse over time. Now I shudder when I have to grind it.
And, yes, I wear full covering gear, respirator, gloves and all. I didn't when I was younger and I think my body is telling me "Don't do it"!!!



Hideous I know. It will look better I promise.

I didn't take any more pictures of the glassing job but I did manage to get the tank together and faired.
I used the gas cap and flange from an old tank I had and glassed it into the inside top of the tank.

I needed to make mounts so I cut up some more sheet metal and made some epoxy on connectors to use the stock rubber donuts.








That's it for now.

Next time: Disaster!
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 07:24 AM   #17
oregoncoast
Racing Like a Noob
 
oregoncoast's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Duh!
Oddometer: 4,441
Fantastic build!

As for the tank, is ethanol-laced fuel going to be an issue with the fiberglass?

There are some plastic options here: http://justgastanks.com/index.php?cPath=4_140

But not as cool as doing it yourself.
oregoncoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 10:59 PM   #18
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Bluhduh Gas tankers

Fortunately here in Alaska we don't have ethanol mixed in the gas so we avoid many of the problems that come with gasohol.

However, I also coated the inside with Caswell gas tank sealer even though I used epoxy resin to build the tank.

I made my own tank because I'm cheap and I was unable to find a tank with the shape I wanted.
And, because everything is so much easier to do, if you have never done it before.
Yep, the less we know about something, the easier and quicker we are sure it will be to do.
Or is it just me?

I had a lot of "challenges" to deal with in the glass tank build and I learned a lot.
How NOT to do it. And how I would do it differently next time.
I will write it up soon but for now, here is the tank in primer:





Lousy pictures I know, but you get the idea I did get it together and overcame the problems.

My home paint shop...

I open the garage door 20" and have the box fan blowing out (exhaust) with the filter in front of it while the rest of the opening below the door is blocked off. Outside air comes in over the top of the door. I move what I am painting to be in front of the fan and then slide it over for the next piece. I shine a halogen work light on what I am painting to keep it warm and I wait until the outside temperature is above zero before painting but it is far from ideal.

I had hoped to get the base color sprayed before going out of state for three weeks but it isn't going to happen.

The IMS tank in the picture getting primer is fiberglassed over the plastic so I can paint it as an experiment.
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 08:15 PM   #19
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Pissed Tanked

After way too much time and trouble I got the tank ready for final mounting and bonding on the mounting cups.

Only problem is, with the cups bonded on, the tank will not fit over the frame.

Turned out that when I glassed the tunnel in I managed to get the tunnel too narrow.
After staring at it for a while I decided to not use the mounting cups/rubber donuts.
So I broke them out and cut the frame mounts off.
The front of the seat holds down the rear of the tank and now I have a proper "racer" mount at the front.
Velcro strap that goes around the frame and an aluminum saddle at the steering head.
Very strong and quick to remove.

Jumping forward in time for the moment, During final assembly I installed the new throttle cables and discovered the elbows of the cables on the carb mount don't fit inside the tunnel! ARGH!!!!

So, once again I had to cut the tank and reglass it. Most frustrating because I had sealed it with Caswell tank sealer and now I had to buy another quart to reseal the new area... With shipping to Alaska (cheapest way) it comes to over $70. That hurts.

This shows the interference of the tank and cables.
The carb is twisted in these pictures to fit the cables in the tunnel and the tank is offset too.












All good now... I hope!
BTW the tank will have rubber isolators that are not on in these pictures. The tank is just sitting on the frame here.

Back to the build timeline now:
With the subframe, seat base, and gas tank fit it was time to strip the bike down for frame welding.
The holes in the frame where the stock seat base lower tubes tie into the rectangular box section and the jagged hole where the upper chain roller had been torn out by the chain at some time in the distant past.


Chain roller damage


Holes in the main frame to be capped.

I also removed tabs and ground down and smoothed some of the "tooth paste" squirted welds on the frame.
The latter proved to be another mistake as the factory welds had zero penetration of the joined pieces.
Once I had ground the weld off the two pieces there was the clear joint crack left.
It looked like a bridge weld where the weld metal was the strength. Surface welds?
With my improving welding ability I was able to do full penetration welds and still smooth them out.
And most of them are covered up anyway.
A waste of time in the long run that I won't bother with on the next build.

Then it was time to send the frame off to be powder coated.
That means removing everything including the bearings and races.
That was fine since all the bearings needed to be replaced anyway.





To be continued...
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 09:25 PM   #20
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Cool2 Bearing up

With the frame gone I worked on other parts and installed the new bearings in the swing arm and shock linkage.
I started making the aluminum tray for the electrics under the seat and the dual vertical stacked headlights in the number plate.
Then when I picked up the frame in its new satin black paint I could start reassembly.

Unfortunately my pictures of that time were accidentally deleted...

Here is a word picture for you,

Beautiful!

Only thing was, the nice shiny buffing I did on the swingarm made it really stand out.
Not in a good way to my eye either...
It looked huge, crude, and out of place.

So, once again I take steps backward and remove the new bearings from the swingarm and send it off to the powder coating shop. Only it gets lost in the mail! After four weeks of me calling the various post offices in the area, the package is found and finally delivered. The address was correct but it had been taken to the wrong post office and they hadn't got around to sending it to the correct place. I had already started looking to buy another one just in case.

The paint shop is a 3 hour drive and they are only open when I am stuck at work so I had the newly painted swingarm delivered by courier as soon as it was ready.
Not trusting the USPS with the valuable property.

I ordered new swingarm bearings to replace the new ones that were damaged when I pulled them and as soon as I had the painted swingarm, I installed the bearings, the swingarm, shock, and the forks to see how it looked....



You may notice the fiberglass frame covers I made to protect the rub area by the foot pegs,
I didn't want my boots to rub off the frame paint as soon as I ride it.
I started to make them in aluminum but they just looked ugly to me.
The covers (guards?) are held in place with velcro and I may put a zip-tie top and bottom also.

If you really look close you can see the aluminum electrics tray under the seat.
I I had planned to polish it but once again I didn't like bringing it to attention.
It is a tight fit in the subframe and it would have paint scratches in no time so I used satin black vinyl wrap on it.

It is really crowded with all the wires, the computer, relays, and all so I ended up mounting the voltage regulator to the bottom of the tray.
That is probably better anyway so it is out in the open air.







Notice the battery mounted on the back?





Now it is time to reinstall the engine:



I use my hoist all the time to save my back.
I spent all afternoon one Saturday trying to get the engine in without scratching the paint on the frame.
I tried with the frame vertical from both sides, no success.
I laid the frame on its side and attempted to lower the engine in, both sides, not happening.
I set the engine on its side and used the hoist to lower the frame down over the engine and that finally worked.
Not on the first side I tried of course, but when I switched to the other side it did slip in. Finally!
I'm glad I wasn't trying to support the weight while doing it, I would have been out of commission with back problems for months!
I have learned to NOT do that again.

I built a simple turntable to mount on my build table so I can work from one side by turning the bike around.
Worked out great and allowed me to use the area behind my build table for storing parts and things.





Moving on it was time to mount the carb with a new ProCycle jet kit in it and figure out how to mount my K&N pod filter.
Some silicone tube, aluminum tube, and hose clamps did the job nicely.








I'm happy with it so far

Next time the numberplate headlight project.

Bedtime for me....
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 10:19 PM   #21
Keith
Slabbing it
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: 901
Oddometer: 879
Sahweet!
__________________
Random Crap
Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 11:24 PM   #22
oregoncoast
Racing Like a Noob
 
oregoncoast's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2007
Location: Duh!
Oddometer: 4,441


Looks great!
oregoncoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 10:07 AM   #23
tileman
Studly Adventurer
 
tileman's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: Melbourne, OZ
Oddometer: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
I think so far it looks as cool as hell!!!!! Subframe looks great, tank works, styling is spot on. Well done, I'll be looking at something like this for my next project!!!!
__________________
If ignorance is bliss, why aren´t more people happy?????
tileman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 05:21 PM   #24
Krasniewski
I don't ride much.
 
Krasniewski's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: LA - Lower Alabama
Oddometer: 1,180
Very cool thread! You have much more patience than me - and it looks like it pays off. This is going to be a great bike to ride very soon, methinks.
Krasniewski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 08:09 PM   #25
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Cool2 Lost in Space

Ah ha!
I found some lost pictures of the build details.
In no particular order, here are some more pictures..

The gas tank shell off the mold and trimmed with the first try at the subframe with bent lower tubes:





Adding a layer of fiberglass roving to the inside of the tank


Where I got the gas cap and filler flange:


Old parts bikes sure are handy at times!

Cleaned up some


Bonding the flange into the tank with thickened epoxy


I drilled holes in the flange for more "grip"






Hmmm, I'm not finding internal and bottom forming pictures, so we will jump to fairing the tank


System 3 epoxy "Quick Fair" tinted with black


Smear it on and sand it down. Repeat. Repeat....




I made up sanding "boards" out of 1/4, 3/8, & 1/2 inch plywood that are the width of 1/4 sheet of sandpaper and about 24" long. I used spray contact cement to stick the cut pieces of sandpaper to one side. I also made some handles to hang on to. The object being tha with the flat surfaces I wanted on the tank I could bend the sanding board to spread the contact area out as long a distance as possible to fair it into shape. I used the more flexible boards in some areas that curve on the upper sides. I also used a simple piece of plywood cut so a belt sander belt fit snugly and I used very course grit on it for rough shaping. Then hand sanding blocks for the tight areas and finally just by hand on the corners. I put on more fairing putty than necessary as I wanted to sand it, NOT the itchy fiberglass.





Another coat goes on...


And finally a coat of tinted resin on the tank, seat base, and laminated plywood base I made to pad for the seat.


That's all I have found for the tank but I did find this picture of what the bike looked with the frame painted and the silver aluminum swingarm. It only looked like this for a few days before I decided to take the swingarm back off and have it powder coated satin black to match the frame.



That's all I have time for now, coming up is how I made the frame covers... teaser shot;

__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 08:16 PM   #26
jgas
Stoogely Adventurerer
 
jgas's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Oddometer: 843
I doubt you could find a better bike for a street tracker. light, fairly quick, (for a single), reliable, tough, easy to get parts for. and you could always put on some half knobbies or even real knobbies and ride it off road a bit. And air cooled singles make the best looking street trackers I think. a DR 650 is a little old school, but enough new school to make it easier in some ways. Great idea. If I come up with a 650 single of any type thats e start I'll be looking at your build for help. I need estart due to a bum kicker leg. I can start little motors but big singles give me problems kicking. I can do it but it ain't fun at all.
__________________
jgas. " Most of the singletrack is gone. Forever"?
-Graduate of the "Rock on the side of the Trail as a Hammer" school of motorcycle repair.
"No matter where you go, there I was".
-DRZ 400, GasGas 275, Klein, zero cc.
jgas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 07:28 AM   #27
road_thing
chingadero
 
road_thing's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Welcome TX
Oddometer: 36
Jaglite: Awesome project! I've got a very similar one coming together, based on a '94 XR600R:



We've made a lot of the same choices. I'm using 17"rear, 10" front w/ Shinko 705's, front and rear lowered about 2", homemade rear subframe, fiberglass from ebay. I've still got to install the brakes and finish the paint, but otherwise it's pretty close to done.

I've got a build threaf going on TWT: http://www.twtex.com/forums/showthre...t=59746&page=2

Can't wait to see both of 'em finished!

rt
road_thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 09:50 AM   #28
Bronco638
Nobody Home
 
Bronco638's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Itasca, IL
Oddometer: 3,712
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite
Curious as to why you decided to mount the seat stays higher instead of at the original mount points. I would think the original points would provide more strength.

Do you plan to cover the R/R, air filter and upper shock mount with something to prevent rear wheel spray from making a mess?

Just noticed the Cobra nose on the wall. Care to explain?

I would like a couple of the frame guards, if you choose to sell them.

Thanks.
__________________
There are some simple thruths......and dogs know what they are - Joseph Duemer

Andy holds the lead. And he will, all the way to the Highway. Today is his day.
Bronco638 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 10:15 PM   #29
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Cool2 Progress details

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgas View Post
I doubt you could find a better bike for a street tracker. light, fairly quick, (for a single), reliable, tough, easy to get parts for. and you could always put on some half knobbies or even real knobbies and ride it off road a bit. And air cooled singles make the best looking street trackers I think. a DR 650 is a little old school, but enough new school to make it easier in some ways. Great idea. If I come up with a 650 single of any type thats e start I'll be looking at your build for help. I need estart due to a bum kicker leg. I can start little motors but big singles give me problems kicking. I can do it but it ain't fun at all.
I agree with you! I love my push starter (E-Start)
I had a DR 500 and an XR 500 without it and if either one didn't feel like starting on the first kick or two, my leg would turn into a wet noodle.

I would like to build a tracker twin, a Yamaha 650, Kawasaki W650, or similar, but they would be a good bit heavier and my motto is "Light is RIGHT!" And a single will be lighter.

Keep watching Craigslist, it is neat what comes up.

Quote:
=road_thing
Jaglite: Awesome project! I've got a very similar one coming together, based on a '94 XR600R:

We've made a lot of the same choices. I'm using 17"rear, 10" front w/ Shinko 705's, front and rear lowered about 2", homemade rear subframe, fiberglass from ebay. I've still got to install the brakes and finish the paint, but otherwise it's pretty close to done.

I've got a build threaf going on TWT: http://www.twtex.com/forums/showthre...t=59746&page=2

Can't wait to see both of 'em finished!

rt
Great fun building a bike into our own idea of what we want isn't it?
I wish I had a build table like yours.
Thanks for the link to your build, now...
Get that bike put back together sir!

Quote:
Bronco638=
.

Curious as to why you decided to mount the seat stays higher instead of at the original mount points. I would think the original points would provide more strength

Do you plan to cover the R/R, air filter and upper shock mount with something to prevent rear wheel spray from making a mess?

Just noticed the Cobra nose on the wall. Care to explain?

I would like a couple of the frame guards, if you choose to sell them.

Thanks.
I wanted to raise the rear braces up for a cleaner (to me anyway) look.
Without carrying the weight of a passenger and luggage, the subframe doesn't need to be anywhere near as strong.
You are correct that it would be stronger to tie into the original locations but I want my bike to have DR riders look twice to figure out what all is different.

I will have a fabric shock cover wrapped around it when riding in conditions that call for it to protect the shaft seals.
I am thinking about cutting a thin clear Lexan sheet to bend and zip-tie in to protect the exposed parts.
But I will not be riding this in mud or rain so I will see if it needs anything.
This is my little street hod rod, I will continue to ride my other DR most of the time when exploring dirt roads.

The Cobra nose is wall art. I have wanted to build a Cobra kit for years but I finally realized it is not in my financial reach so the nose is all I could afford.
I bought it unfinished and painted it to look like it had run many races before getting hung on the wall.

No frame cover production for me! But follow along and I will show how easy you can make your own....
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2013, 10:42 PM   #30
JagLite OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 1,054
Cool2 Frame Cover Construction 101

Easy peasy to do

I used clear packing tape to cover the frame and then used plastic to protect the frame around the area, thusly:







That was the first layup of 3 layers of 6 oz glass cloth.
Once that was dry I popped them off (the epoxy I used doesn't stick to the plastic or tape)
and cut the rough edges off:









I marked my cut line with a grey sharpie



Then see how it fits...


Then I just mixed up a bit more epoxy with black tint in it and brushed it on to fill the weave.
I could have faired them like the tank to make them nice and smooth but I didn't bother since they will get a lot of boot abuse. They could be made of carbon fiber for the look but they don't weigh anything in glass. They are not thick and strong since they don't need to be. They will only see abrasion, not blunt force trauma.

While I made mine when the frame was emty but it could easily be done on the bike by leaning it over a ways and do one side at a time.

Since making mine I learned a better way to make neat small parts like this.
Cut the layers of cloth oversize and lay them on clear plastic.
Wet the layers out one or two at a time and when the are all wet, lay another piece of clear plastic over the top ans squeegee the plastic to get the resin all nice and smooth.
Then take your scissors or shears and cut the plastic and glass to the finished size, peel the plastic off one side and lay the clean edge cut wet out fiberglass in place before peeling off the other piece of plastic.
Works fantastic! Perfect uniform resin/glass ratio and thickness and beautiful straight edges without the glass fibers trailing all over.

Ah, well, we are always learning new and better ways to do things, eh?
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 07:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014