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Old 02-03-2013, 02:38 PM   #1
Harry'O OP
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Shifter not working right

Any ideas? I had trouble getting my Bandit 1250 out of 6th last weak. Then today shifting into 6th the tranny jumped back into 5th. I know there's a problem here but is it defiantly serious or is it like a new clutch or maybe just clutch fluid. I'm not sure if the engine oil also lunes the clutch on this bike or not.
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:47 PM   #2
Scrivens
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Before you do anything drastic pull the side cover and check the lever linkages for slop. I haven't heard of any box failures in the 1250, though it is possible of course.
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:49 PM   #3
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Good advice. I'll do that. Now that you mention it I read somewhere, a few years back, that a little slop can have major effect on shifts. I'll check it out and get back.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:17 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrivens View Post
Before you do anything drastic pull the side cover and check the lever linkages for slop. I haven't heard of any box failures in the 1250, though it is possible of course.
OK, Took the cover off of the shifter box and made sure all linkages are tight and cleaned and oiled etc. Everything seems to be in order. I also spoke with my mechanic and he told me there is no way the cogs on this tranny are out of shape and that what I experienced is likely due to 2 things:

1) Becuase I was in a high gear (6) and had to stop quickly I pulled in the clutch and hit the brakes without downshifting. Now sitting at a stop it isn't strange that I couldn't just stab the gears back down to neutral. I had to feather the clutch and rock the bike to line up the gears. Apparently this isn't strange.
2) When the gears jumped from 6 to 5 without input it was likely just a half shift into 6th and that's why it jumped back into 5th. Now that has NEVER happened before but I'm guessing it is what happened in that shift. Hopefully becuase I am not buying a new tranny.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:15 AM   #5
LuciferMutt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry'O View Post
OK, Took the cover off of the shifter box and made sure all linkages are tight and cleaned and oiled etc. Everything seems to be in order. I also spoke with my mechanic and he told me there is no way the cogs on this tranny are out of shape and that what I experienced is likely due to 2 things:

1) Becuase I was in a high gear (6) and had to stop quickly I pulled in the clutch and hit the brakes without downshifting. Now sitting at a stop it isn't strange that I couldn't just stab the gears back down to neutral. I had to feather the clutch and rock the bike to line up the gears. Apparently this isn't strange.
2) When the gears jumped from 6 to 5 without input it was likely just a half shift into 6th and that's why it jumped back into 5th. Now that has NEVER happened before but I'm guessing it is what happened in that shift. Hopefully becuase I am not buying a new tranny.

Your mechanic is right about the downshifting while at a standstill part. Sequential transmissions don't like this. Even if you have to stop quickly, and are not even engaging the gears with the clutch (ie keeping the clutch squeezed) on the way down, you should still tap down through the gears while the bike is still moving. It's also much safer for you to already be in 1st as you roll to a stop in case you need to suddenly get moving again.

As for part two, I have had a couple of gears jump out before. Usually it jumps out of first in to N because I did something goofy trying to engage first. Unless it happens frequently, I wouldn't worry about it. Worse case scenario is a bent shifter fork which can be replaced.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:48 PM   #6
Scrivens
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Originally Posted by Harry'O View Post
2) When the gears jumped from 6 to 5 without input it was likely just a half shift into 6th and that's why it jumped back into 5th.
My Kawasaki does that often as the throw to 5th is slightly longer than the lower 4 gears and snicking the lever up doesn't always 'seat' the gear. Dropping the gears from top at a stop can cause a box to stiffen up and get notchy as mentioned by a previous poster. The 1250 is a very solid engine - loved mine (1250S) but hated the ergos - and it is unlikely you have any mechanical problems.
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Old 02-05-2013, 01:49 PM   #7
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Agree about downshifting when rolling. I have owned a number of Suzukis and they all require movement or blipping of the throttle to get down through the gears if I am going to slow. Oil brand, weight, and mileage has a significant effect too. Many find that just changing the oil clears things up.

As for the mis-shifting, I have some suggestions...

First, at the start of the shift, pre-load the shifter slightly before cutting the throttle and clutching. Only do this a split second before the shift because it does put friction between the shift forks and cogs.

Then, when you are ready to execute the shift. Simultaneously squeeze the clutch, increase the shifter pressure and reduce throttle.

When you feel the shifter move, KEEP pressure on it while you increase the throttle and let the clutch out. Only after the clutch is fully out do you relax the shifter. The reason for this is that if the next cog was not fully engaged, it will click in when you let the clutch out and get the tranny spinning again.

That last step is what solves nearly all the miss shifts in my experience. If you don't leave pressure on the shifter and you are between gears, the tranny may click back down to the lower of the two gears instead of up to fully engage the next gear.

Cliffs notes: here is she shift sequence

Light pressure on the shifter-->Begin squeezing clutch/Increase shift pressure/reduce throttle-->Clutch fully in, wait for gear lever to click up-->Increase throttle/let out clutch/HOLD shifter pressure-->clutch fully out-->relax shifter.

You will sometimes notice the shifter moving slightly just as you let the clutch back out...congrats...you have just prevented a missed shift!
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Old 02-05-2013, 04:02 PM   #8
Randy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjensen641 View Post
Agree about downshifting when rolling. I have owned a number of Suzukis and they all require movement or blipping of the throttle to get down through the gears if I am going to slow. Oil brand, weight, and mileage has a significant effect too. Many find that just changing the oil clears things up.

As for the mis-shifting, I have some suggestions...

First, at the start of the shift, pre-load the shifter slightly before cutting the throttle and clutching. Only do this a split second before the shift because it does put friction between the shift forks and cogs.

Then, when you are ready to execute the shift. Simultaneously squeeze the clutch, increase the shifter pressure and reduce throttle.

When you feel the shifter move, KEEP pressure on it while you increase the throttle and let the clutch out. Only after the clutch is fully out do you relax the shifter. The reason for this is that if the next cog was not fully engaged, it will click in when you let the clutch out and get the tranny spinning again.

That last step is what solves nearly all the miss shifts in my experience. If you don't leave pressure on the shifter and you are between gears, the tranny may click back down to the lower of the two gears instead of up to fully engage the next gear.

Cliffs notes: here is she shift sequence

Light pressure on the shifter-->Begin squeezing clutch/Increase shift pressure/reduce throttle-->Clutch fully in, wait for gear lever to click up-->Increase throttle/let out clutch/HOLD shifter pressure-->clutch fully out-->relax shifter.

You will sometimes notice the shifter moving slightly just as you let the clutch back out...congrats...you have just prevented a missed shift!
Very good advice on all of the above. I was going to suggest much the same thing, but pjensen put it much better than I likely would have.
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