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Old 01-30-2013, 07:10 PM   #1
mech481 OP
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Question Circular timing cover gaskets

Just removed my timing cover to check the chain and replace whatever is needed kept an eye out for the circular gaskets, but no show,? where exactly should they have been as all my cover seems to have is the main gasket
I have an R100TIC 1982 I asume all airheads should have the same gaskets set up on the timing cover.

any help appreciated
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:15 PM   #2
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Do you perhaps mean the camshaft/alternator oil seal? I was just into my '83 80ST and all there was for gaskets was the main gasket... plus oil seals and the o-ring around the timing unit....

plug your model into the MAX BMW fiche and you should see exactly what was spec'd for that bike.....

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Old 01-30-2013, 07:34 PM   #3
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They go on the top two corner bolts that are up above and outside the gasket. They keep the the cover from bowing of those two bolts are tightened without the same gasket thickness as all the lower bolts and nuts.
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:37 PM   #4
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It's the two "donut" gaskets that go on the upper part of the timing case, apart from the "main" gasket. It should have them to keep from distorting the timing case. Check the appropriate Fiche at MaxBMW...




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Old 01-30-2013, 07:54 PM   #5
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Hmmm. I just learned something... cuz I had mine off, and installed a new main gasket, but was totally unaware of those "round" gaskets. Must be part #9 in this fiche (from my 80ST, but the same part shows up for the o.p.'s 1982 R100)

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Old 01-31-2013, 01:14 AM   #6
Bill Harris
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Same thing since the dawn of time-- that teeny-tiny fiche page is for my /5. Typical teutonic quaint attention to detail. It's only 1-2 thou but maybe enough to "bow" the cover and cause leaks. Just maybe. I wouldn't sweat it enough to redo the timing cover, just get it next time. In an absolute pinch, you can use a scraped-off piece of the old main gasket in place of the donuts...

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Old 01-31-2013, 06:47 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
It's only 1-2 thou but maybe enough to "bow" the cover and cause leaks. Just maybe.
That's the reason why those gaskets are needed. In fact they're spacers.
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Old 01-31-2013, 01:09 PM   #8
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I would re-do it right myself.
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Old 01-31-2013, 05:08 PM   #9
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I just went out to the shop and took a look, and yes there is a hairline crack through which I can see light, above the "big" gasket.... Luckily I am still working in the area, so I think I can probably just pull those two bolts, and slack off the other fasteners enough to slip in a spacer... which could well be a washer, or may be the correct little buggers....





PS... can anybody tell me what that rectifier pack is? it says "Emerald" on the back side, and I have a Motorrad sticker on the voltage regulator.....
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Old 01-31-2013, 05:59 PM   #10
mech481 OP
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Thanks for the help gents it all makes sense now as I was looking to see where the should go thinking they seal in oil but as spacers above the gasket that makes sense.
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Old 01-31-2013, 06:15 PM   #11
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Did the timing chain on the /5 a few years ago and one of the donut gaskets was missing. There was a constant leak below on that side. Put in the correct gaskets during the swap, no leaks. AFAIK, I was the first in there since it left the factory.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
PS... can anybody tell me what that rectifier pack is? it says "Emerald" on the back side, and I have a Motorrad sticker on the voltage regulator.....
That is an Omega diode board (as in Motorrad Omega system). You can buy the diode board as a separate item. You may or may not have the entire system-- side-by-side it's easy to tell Omega from stock, but it's hard to tell just by looking separately. Easiest way to tell is to measure the diameter of the rotor-- AFIK, it is 92mm? and the stock is 88mm?. But not sure of those numbers-- I've got them jotted down somewhere.

The Omega alternator is made by Emerald Island, a Taiwan company. Lotsa neat stuff: http://www.repro-works.com/

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Old 02-01-2013, 07:10 AM   #13
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Does Emerald Island sell direct? Can't seem to find prices. Lots of cool stuff.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:39 AM   #14
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Emerald isle don't sell direct, I've tried.

Motorworks in the UK sell their stuff, Rick in the US and their is an aussi distributor as well
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:46 PM   #15
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I suspect that they sell direct but on in lots of 1000. Best to go to your local Motorrad Rick. Lots of neat stuff, though, if there were a way to get our collective grubby little hands on it. Seems that a lot of it is and/or ought be be available through various US dealers.

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