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Old 02-06-2013, 02:14 PM   #16
mrbreeze OP
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I can't believe they still use a drum brake on these things.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:34 PM   #17
Davidc83
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Originally Posted by mrbreeze View Post
I can't believe they still use a drum brake on these things.
So, I got 58,000 miles on my C50 and it has the original shoes with plenty of adjustment still in the drum brake. Anyone who knows how to ride, knows how to use drum brakes-no big deal.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:38 PM   #18
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ok, thanks bud, good to know it's never really needed much adjustment. I will definitely check mine this spring. I learned on a c50, it's a very nice and stable bike, but once i got my feet wet I wanted something sportier so went with the m50, and no issues or regrets so far
I like the looks of the M50, it does look sportier, but is it really. They have the same engine, they are tuned the same, they have the same HP, same drive train; the M50 does weigh a little less (but not that much).
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:21 PM   #19
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The difference is in the seating position and suspension. Coming off of a c50 you'd find the m50 leaned forward. The front suspension is also different, more rake on the c50 than the m50 which has inverted forks and also very different tires. They really are two different bikes, once you get to ride them, even thought the powertrain is the same.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:10 PM   #20
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No bike, other than a huge, heavy touring bike, and the Goldwing is the only one that comes to mind at the moment, needs a rear disc. My former EX500 had a rear disc. Couldn't tell it from a drum. My '95 Goldwing has a disc. Probably needs it. Besides the EX, last bike I owned with a rear disc was an '01 KLR650. Again couldn't tell the difference. 90% of the braking is done with the front brake anyway. Most everybody complained about the front disc on the first gen KLR. I found it fine. Not touchy, but still had plenty of stopping power. No mid size bike will ever need a rear disc. It's just extra cost and complication. The rear shoes on my '02 Vulcan 750 lated past 60,000 miles. Went through a LOT of front pads in that time. IMO, mechanical things should be kept as simple as you can get away with, and still have them work properly. Technology just for the sake of technology is dumb.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:54 AM   #21
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Don't Victorys use cam chains?

I thought they would run 200,000 miles?
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:51 AM   #22
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No bike, other than a huge, heavy touring bike, and the Goldwing is the only one that comes to mind at the moment, needs a rear disc. My former EX500 had a rear disc. Couldn't tell it from a drum. My '95 Goldwing has a disc. Probably needs it. Besides the EX, last bike I owned with a rear disc was an '01 KLR650. Again couldn't tell the difference. 90% of the braking is done with the front brake anyway. Most everybody complained about the front disc on the first gen KLR. I found it fine. Not touchy, but still had plenty of stopping power. No mid size bike will ever need a rear disc. It's just extra cost and complication. The rear shoes on my '02 Vulcan 750 lated past 60,000 miles. Went through a LOT of front pads in that time. IMO, mechanical things should be kept as simple as you can get away with, and still have them work properly. Technology just for the sake of technology is dumb.
How could a rear disc be more costly and complicated than a drum? I would think the drum would be more costly and complicated (just my guess). You have to keep a drum adjusted properly. Not so with a disc. You want to change brakes shoes, you have to remove the rear wheel. Not so with changing pads. I remember drum brakes, and brake pedals that varied in travel depending on the adjustment of the brake. I don't know how you could not tell a disc from a drum.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:52 PM   #23
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How could a rear disc be more costly and complicated than a drum? I would think the drum would be more costly and complicated (just my guess). You have to keep a drum adjusted properly. Not so with a disc. You want to change brakes shoes, you have to remove the rear wheel. Not so with changing pads. I remember drum brakes, and brake pedals that varied in travel depending on the adjustment of the brake. I don't know how you could not tell a disc from a drum.
Rear disks are more costly. Price out the rotors, they usually cost as much as a wheel. Plus you got brake lines with brake fluid for rear disks-more added cost in developement and maintaining. You cant adjust the feel of the rear disk, while with drum brakes, if you like a tight brake pedal or a loose brake pedal, a turn of the screw on the drum and you have it adjusted to your liking. As I have stated, I have 58,000 miles on my C50 and I have adjusted the rear brake 2 times (and both after tire installations and the techs adjusted them to a setting I didnt like). I have the original drum shoes, and I looked at the adjustor this evening and I have over 60% of the original settings for the shoes (i am on my 3rd set of front disk pads).
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:29 AM   #24
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well, it's been a long time since I had a bike with a drum rear brake, but I am certain I never got anything like 58,000 miles out of a set of shoes. You must rarely use your rear brake. I use mine a lot.

I also remember having to swap out all three discs on my old Concours. I went with aftermarket rotors to save a few dollars, but if memory serves me correctly I spent less than $400 for all three. I had to replace the front wheel on my DL1000, and it was almost $800.

I checked bikebandit.com, and their price for an oem rear wheel for the M50 is $931. The rear disc (OEM) for a DL1000 is $227. I also noticed they want $53 for a set of shoes. Not cheap. Maybe they make them a lot better now than they did back when I used them.

I will stick with the disc.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:13 AM   #25
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naw, I am just easy on brakes, I am off the throttle early, I do a lot of engine braking. On the C50, unless i have to do emergency braking, I dont apply the brakes at stops until the last 5-10 feet. I was taught to downshift and use the engine to slow down (back in the 70s) and it does save on brakes.
I am easy on brakes on my cars also; got 170,000 miles on my jeep and only had to change discs and shoes once on this jeep. My prior jeep, which I sold at 165,000 miles, never had to change the discs or shoes.
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