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Old 02-26-2013, 09:05 PM   #76
xcflyn OP
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Originally Posted by wescnmbkr1 View Post
You have the kind of shop and equipment I've always dreamed of some day having, and living in similar surroundings--------guess I'll have to continue dreaming!
Great equipment, quality workmanship, and terrific attitude for your customers! Job well done!
Thanks !

Now to continue with this never ending project -

Had to set up to do some punching today.

Made a bunch of little plugs -


Just kidding - actually had to make holes and there are times I can set up and punch holes quicker then drilling them on the mill.

Actually because these have to match up with the pattern on those crazy isolators the holes needed to be fairly exact. My method is this- set up the mill to peck the pattern in 1 plate. The punch has a center point to line up into the peck point. I locate 1 hole set stops-punch the rest,set up the next hole and repeat. Knocked out 48 -1/2" holes in about 10 minutes.

Using a center drill it just sets a point like a center punch but a little better and easier then laying it out and punching.

Set up the plates on the table for welding - I sheared those plates prior to punching so they were a little tweeked + the holes take a little stress out and add a little stress so clamping the plates was pretty critical, with the amount of weld they want on these its worth taking the time to set it up right.
The back side I have a cast angle plate that the vice grip is pulling up. The block is a piece I cut so I didnt have to measure each center gusset.


Snack time- Girlfriends B-day so she made me cup cakes Last couple bites kinda tasted like argon and anti splatter

Finished plate - ya my welding is pretty inconsistent and sloppy

I am getting close to finishing this project
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Old 02-27-2013, 02:45 AM   #77
Laconic
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When you tack up a piece like that, do you have a method for deciding which tacks to do first, to minimise stress/warping/tweaking?
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:10 AM   #78
xcflyn OP
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When you tack up a piece like that, do you have a method for deciding which tacks to do first, to minimise stress/warping/tweaking?
I do, not going to say it is the "right" way,others may do different. BUT.....
With that gusset pushed tight to the corner and square I hit the bottom out side end first -of the first two tacks on one gusset ; that one is hardest to hit-. The second tack counters the first so I want that one to be quick and and easy to hit hopefully before the first can start solidify and pull, generally I am no that quick, but the plate can not pull out of the corner anyhow,worse case it can twist (Second tack is top) but before I add the third inside corner tack I check to see it stays square,its still easy to tap the inside corner to square it up. Personally I hate that magnet I am using. They are cheap and you get what you pay for. I like the Strong Hand magnets you can switch on and off, 5 X's better holding power and 1000X's easier to get the grinding,splatter, and metal shavings out of.
I tend to finish weld in more of scattered sequence, the middle plate getting welded on both sides I start there. I do look at every piece to see if it has any twist in the plate or anything that will dictate a the better place to start. The pulling of the first weld can be used to your advantage once in awhile.
Years ago I hired a guy who would never square parts up until after he put his first tack in. He came from a welding shop and as much as I didnt like his method I thought maybe the kid would teach me something After discussion with him on this I thought I would just see how he did, after all there is more than one way to skin a cat. That method was o.k. on some parts but on his first big project I realized he was so used to his ways that he could could not bounce around with any speed to try to counter his tacks. Also though he was school taught and job trained, he didnt know how weld with enough thought to keep the pieces from warping. Literally would weld right to left or left to right. I spent hours "sharing" a project with him to try to gently curve his ways but he really never got it.
End to that story is funny, the place up road was hiring a weldor to run their robot, paid better, he got the job and moved on. By pure chance (and luck) I ended up hiring the guy who he replaced and he was a awesome weldor and great guy. Win win and no hard feelings. There's a solution for everything and sometimes its even a great solution that just happens by chance. I try to remember that when I am beating my head against the wall trying to figure out the "impossible"
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:42 PM   #79
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Well I hoped to finish up the project but the last two days brought odd jobs in that got me side tracked.
The water jet has no way to located a true zero - actually it is a "eagle eye" zero point. Generally you are cutting from sheets and a true zero is not all that critical. But many times I want to cut out of whats left of a sheet or even a piece of flat stock. So I figured without spending a lot of time I could come up with a simple solution, most important was to be able to lay a piece of flat stock in on the table and set it true with one axis or the other.
So this started as a piece of 1/2" 6061. I turned the outside first just enough to get a clean cut and that way after drilling the .060 hole in one end I can part it and flip it and drill and ream a .376 hole to slide over the focus tube.

Check fit on a old tube, fits just as it should. I dont like to use tools and such over the water table so I decided I would slip a piece of paper or other soft material to create interference instead of a set screw. A piece of paper towel worked perfect. I used a piece of .060 wire as the replaceable tip, I just cut a small piece off-upset the one end and it stick into the hole then push it snug.

It even works


But for this final post I did get the project finished and ready to go for galvanizing

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Old 03-03-2013, 05:10 PM   #80
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Not very exciting but I got to use a mill for the first time ever today. My QCTP holders have a max bit size of 5/8" but all my nice Kennametal tool holders are 3/4" so I opened up the holders 1/8" on a mill at Tech Shop. It's very similar to a lathe in terms of controls and I don't think it would take me long to learn to be dangerous on that tool



Next to another holder with 1/2" cemented carbide tool bit (which I hate)



I was stuck using the HSS tooling blanks for a year but I'm glad to be going back to inserts they are just so much easier and leave a great surface finish.

If any of you who are into machining or want to know more about machining, I highly recommend Tubalcain as a basic primer. He's great for explaining the most basic of operations.

http://www.youtube.com/user/mrpete222

Once you get a little experience, there's another guy I just came across and he's fantastic.

http://www.youtube.com/user/KEF791/v...ew=0&flow=grid

Keith Fenner. His videos are very long, and detailed. He basically takes you through some fairly complex projects from start to finish. He's humble, old school, and entertaining and his videos are excellent quality. Can't believe I haven't seen them before. I even bought a hat as a donation I was so impressed. Just fair warning, some of his projects are 10 installments at ~30 minutes each. For an amateur machinist. watching him work is like being an apprentice in a shop, I've picked up some excellent tips.

Just finished watching this series and was impressed

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sailah screwed with this post 03-03-2013 at 05:17 PM
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Old 03-03-2013, 06:46 PM   #81
jar944
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I finally got around to making the swingarm extensions I tried to start on a couple weeks ago.

cutting the stock with my newly fixed saw.


back side cut to correct thickness


roughing out the slot




finishing cuts


mostly done


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Old 03-04-2013, 05:53 AM   #82
xcflyn OP
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Originally Posted by sailah View Post
Keith Fenner. His videos are very long, and detailed. He basically takes you through some fairly complex projects from start to finish. He's humble, old school, and entertaining and his videos are excellent quality. Can't believe I haven't seen them before. I even bought a hat as a donation I was so impressed. Just fair warning, some of his projects are 10 installments at ~30 minutes each. For an amateur machinist. watching him work is like being an apprentice in a shop, I've picked up some excellent tips.
Just finished watching this series and was impressed
Fenner is a great "traditional" machinist ! I dont think the guy even has a read out on his machines ? great guy to learn from !
Holders looked great, glad to see you open the holder up and not take the tool down like you see some guys do. Do those phase two holders have metric set screws or standard ? I think the wedge type fit an Aloris post and I need to order one I can machine into a modified knurling tool holder, easier to start with something then start from scratch.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:52 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by xcflyn View Post
Do those phase two holders have metric set screws or standard ?
10mm x 1.5mm for the phase 2 250 series I have. Some of the hex sockets strip out if you look at them cross-eyed, but other than needing the set screws replaced, they seem pretty robust.

This thread rocks!
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Old 03-04-2013, 07:18 AM   #84
jar944
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I need to order one I can machine into a modified knurling tool holder, easier to start with something then start from scratch.

http://www.cdcotools.com/category.php?categoryid=19
About as inexpensive as i have found. (BXA 2.750" oal)

BXA $9
CXA $16
CA $23

http://www.tools4cheap.net/proddetail.php?prod=bxatf1
2x as much but the BXA is 3.5" oal
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:59 PM   #85
xcflyn OP
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Originally Posted by jar944 View Post
http://www.cdcotools.com/category.php?categoryid=19
About as inexpensive as i have found. (BXA 2.750" oal)

BXA $9
CXA $16
CA $23

http://www.tools4cheap.net/proddetail.php?prod=bxatf1
2x as much but the BXA is 3.5" oal
Thanks !

jar - nice use of old bearings on that swing arm ! Great idea
Over the weekend beside installing $600 worth of parts into the water jet pump I managed to make this- A little over kill - 3/8 plate & 9" channel.


Today was a 14 hour day with about 2 hours worth of accomplishments.
I have a local builder that wanted some dummy beam box's made for a home I did some supports on a while back.
A crummy but pretty accurate jig for making - - - - -

And a tool to locate 3/4" washers on 3/8" lag bolts.

The customer said he was going to just eye them in place --- ahh no
So it was a freebie --- make that two freebies I didnt like the first one so I made a second two piece one
The hole is a weld through so pretty it was not

Then I made the dummy bolts - the lags are going to hold the beam box's in place

to be plug welded in place

here is what they look like the small holes are for the lags.

This is one of the lags- I made it two pieces so they can put a impact on it easy then install the stud

cant hardly tell one from the other , I hope

inside

I know not too exciting.
But better then this project -
1/8" X 1/2" 6061 - 45 ends to point and machine 45 down each edge - like milling a piece of bacon

For this result - if the guy likes them I do a couple hundred that are 23.600 long.

Some wall art thing that get LED's that will illuminate the small chamfers on the sides ??? This has been a two month project of making samples and no real job. Sooner or later I hope this turns into a real job, for now its more about making sure it will be right when he does move on it.

xcflyn screwed with this post 03-05-2013 at 05:52 AM
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:52 AM   #86
jar944
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jar - nice use of old bearings on that swing arm ! Great idea
Thanks they work well since you can bolt through them and are generally rather precise in their dimensions, they also work great in a press as spacers
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:36 AM   #87
sailah
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Hey jar,

I'm no expert but that swingarm extension looks like a lot of leverage on that joint. I'm interested to know your thought process? Looks very well made but do you think that will be solid? Thx
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:57 AM   #88
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Hey jar,

I'm no expert but that swingarm extension looks like a lot of leverage on that joint. I'm interested to know your thought process? Looks very well made but do you think that will be solid? Thx

Here's to hoping a truss is next.

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Old 03-05-2013, 10:03 AM   #89
sailah
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I hope you didn't take my comment the wrong way I'm sure there is something else in store just interested to see the final project
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Old 03-05-2013, 10:23 AM   #90
jar944
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Hey jar,

I'm no expert but that swingarm extension looks like a lot of leverage on that joint. I'm interested to know your thought process? Looks very well made but do you think that will be solid? Thx
I agree they look weak, but they work in the actual application.






Bolton extensions are a standard item in hillclimbing

jump to 1:08
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAZt3Mjnhuk
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