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Old 09-28-2011, 10:15 PM   #1
thomasac92 OP
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Looking to buy first motorcycle

I've been researching a few different kinds motorcycles. Mostly honda cb and cl and yamaha rd's. I want something cheap, fairly light weight, but with enough power for highway travel. Im trying to eventually go on long trips once I feel comfortable, but im still pretty new to this and I dont have any experience working on bikes so any suggestions on reading material or other websites would be appreciated.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:26 PM   #2
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No experience working on bikes but the ones you just mentioned are 40 years old? Long trips?

Some more information would be helpful...
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:34 PM   #3
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DRZ400SM. enough power to go down the road. Easy to work on. Great aftermarket support. Wont break if it falls over.and its a good beginner bike
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:35 PM   #4
thomasac92 OP
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I like the way that certain style of bike looks and they seem to be on the cheaper side. Would I be better off buying a newer model? I have a 50cc honda ruckus that ive played around with but I want something faster.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:38 PM   #5
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A universal Japanese Motorcycle is good start. I reccomend the SM because its a perfect starter.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:41 PM   #6
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Easiest thing I can think of for meeting all your wants and being able to deal with the lacks.


Gladius 650.... You can add Givi hard side cases, you can get a screen, it is very forgiving, not much to do but oil changes, gas, and lube your chain. I have driven one for about 4k miles in a month and a half. LOVED it!



It is quick, does good on the highway, indestructable engine, reminds me of the the older bikes as far as the UJM's when bikes were do it all.


The basic Bonneville se would be the other, but it is a bit more pricey, but very familiar feeling, smooth, a little heavier feel.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:44 PM   #7
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You may want to let us know what you like, Full fairings, naked, cruiser, sport, sport touring. Do you want a minnie sport tourer? A do it all? give a hint lol!
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:47 PM   #8
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Long trips on a older Honda CB (like a 350/450) and a RD Yamaha will be a modern day torture, trust me, I rode the piss out of those bikes when they were new and anything over 90 miles was pretty uncomfortable even then - and the best bike of the day, by the way, weren't much better either, excepting a Honda 750 four.

I had a R7 and RD350, and I thought I'd hit the big time. I've ridden a bunch of 350/450's Honda's too, but honestly these days they are best for riding on back-roads, no more than 50-55 for extended periods.

You'll have long trips that's almost for sure, because they may fail you "out there". Compared with newer bikes they require a lot more maintenance, a lot of frequent fiddling, and if you don't like to work on them (and are good at old school stuff) finding a competent wrench who is actually willing to work on one can be a challenge.

Those bikes are lovely classics, good to have for sure, but as your only bike for "long trips" - sorry, to burst your bubble. That doesn't mean you can't tour on a smaller simple, inexpensive bike that looks like a older bike. A GS500, EX500r, or EX250r can do it way better than a RD or CB350. They probably won't break, and you'll be spending much less, too - as they aren't considered a classic.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasac92 View Post
I like the way that certain style of bike looks and they seem to be on the cheaper side. Would I be better off buying a newer model? I have a 50cc honda ruckus that ive played around with but I want something faster.
Well - yeah something newer would be better. At least new enough to have electronic ignition (you don't want to be messing with breaker points as a nOOb). A front disk brake would be nice too. A 2-stroke Yamaha RD probably isn't a good newbie bike for a number of reasons.

I've had a few CB's and a CL
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=299567

Working on an old bike can be a great learning experience. If you really want to ride it would be better to get something newer. Maybe pick up a project later.

How much do you have to spend? The Suzuki TU250 is retro styled but a very modern bike, even has fuel injection.
Giant thread here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=414302

The new generation Triumph Bonneville would be a good choice too (as See red suggested).
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tbirdsp screwed with this post 09-28-2011 at 10:56 PM
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:01 PM   #10
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My four starter bike favs in no real order; GS500, EX/ninja500, SV650, DRZ400 for dual sporting. All great learners ya can use in the real world and have fun with for a long time. There is nothing about the bikes you are looking at that says good starter bike.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:09 PM   #11
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Im not to sure what I want. Im just trying to do as much research as possible before I buy something that I regret. I would say anything over a few thousand is out of the picture. I spend most of my money on rent and music equipment. Which doesnt leave too much to put away for a newer bike. Im leaning towards the dual sports and simpler stripped down bikes. Not to fond of the crotch rockets either.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0ldhippie View Post
My four starter bike favs in no real order; GS500, EX/ninja500, SV650, DRZ400 for dual sporting. All great learners ya can use in the real world and have fun with for a long time. There is nothing about the bikes you are looking at that says good starter bike.
Good choices ( I have owned 2 of them - SV and DRZ - plus an EX250) - but he said "I like the way that certain style of bike looks" speaking of the old CB/CL/RD
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:19 PM   #13
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We're saving you a lot of research right now! - old codgers with nothing better to do late at night than recall their years on many, many bikes.

Seriously, you could probably find a EX500r or GS500 in great shape for $1200-$2000 (at most). Get someone you can trust to verify it's in good shape and off you go. Either of those bikes could take a load of gear and yourself (two up is a different story) and handle whatever, including some west Texas winds if that's where you find yourself. The Ninja 250, while a great bike would be out of its league in places like that.

Bikes are so much better than the old days its not even funny. Many of them, yes, look ghastly compared to the "old school", but you can get close enough (unfaired GS500 comes to mind) that the style factor won't be a a problem. A GS 500 is basically a modern day CB anyway (it started in '89, versus '69, if that's modern) with probably 1/2 the maintenance and 3 times the reliability/longevity.
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:21 PM   #14
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And they handle better, and brake sooooo much better. Huge pluses right there!
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Old 09-28-2011, 11:56 PM   #15
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This year I bought a new 2009 Suzuki TU250 from a dealer, $3600 OTD price after all the dealer and delivery fees. That is the best deal I think you can find for a new bike. For a new Ninja 250 or CB250, add $1000 usually. Even most new Rebels or VStar 250's sell upwards of $4000 OTD, and those two are much smaller and more limited 250cc's than the other three I mentioned. New dual sport 250's are much more expensive than street 250's across the board.

The best deal I could find a new bike was the TU250. I don't regret it at all. I do get the advertised 79 mpg, I do fit comfortably on it at 6'3", and it gets me down the road or the highway reliably. It is cheap to maintain and easy to work on. It has a nice, retro UJM look and feel that is refreshing, actually. The above mentioned thread here on ADV provides a good resource for ideas and experiences from a good community of TU250 enthusiasts.

Yes, all the TU owners lust for an imagined TU350 or TU500, because the TU250 does what it does so well. You're not going to post triple digits on a TU250, but you're going to be able to hang and have a lot of fun in all <100mph traffic. Longer road trips are not out of the realm of imagination for a TU250. Recently Doug riding his Dirtster to Madagan encountered a guy riding a Suzuki ST250 out near there. That's the Japanese market equivalent of the TU250 (pretty much the same bike, minus the fuel injection of the TU). You can load it up, ride two-up, and the bike still performs pretty much the same. Just add Iron Butt.
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