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Old 02-10-2013, 11:26 PM   #16
larrylarry75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbolling View Post
I have both and really enjoy riding them both.
I've got a well used 2006 Ninja 650R that's low enough to the ground to suit me and it's been a wonderful touring machine as well. I seem to accumulate all sorts of bikes & scooters but when it comes time to head out I always seem to pick the Ninja. The reasons are many but first and foremost is the reliability factor with ergonomics a close second. For some that latter might not apply but I knew the very first time I threw a leg over it I'd found my ride. Much as I love my scooters and a couple of higher end bikes I always gravitate back to it, not unlike wearing a favorite pair of boots. If ever the beastie dies I fully expect to buy another one just like it, and in fact I've been thinking about finding one of the same year and just stashing it away for that day. Silly isn't it?

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Old 02-11-2013, 12:52 AM   #17
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Just my 2 cents, but what about renting or borrowing one of each, separately, and riding them on the same routes. This should give you the basic feel of what operating each of them will be like for both short trips, and longer ones.

As far as other people's opinions about what you choose, I say forget it. I get a kick out of it when people talk trash about my riding scooters, despite not knowing anything about what a capable rider I am on so many other platforms. Ride what you like, and what you enjoy owning, simple as that, IMO.

Lastly, I'm glad you mentioned your need for speed being different from that of [most] 20 year olds. With that in mind, I will just say that you can always ride your motorcycles slowly, but not every scooter can go fast. If you really don't care about the go-fast, then I'd lean even more towards scooting.
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:46 AM   #18
damasovi
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hi Darre;

I have one of each and like them both, and I have to say today I do not know what I would keep if I had be be done to just 1, my KLR 650 is my fast, 2 up, dirt, and interstate bike, the scooter is 100 cc of fun fun fun !

If you want the burgman I think you have a winner there! since it is all the speed you want, a lot of comfort for you and maybe the wife too. What will you not get with the scooter? well no off road (unless you really want to) and??? no I can't think of it unless 150 mph is your thing.

as mention above,rent or barrow one of each and then make your decision.

Cheers

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Old 02-11-2013, 02:52 AM   #19
Scott_F
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Motorcycles are motorcycles and fall into different groups. There are highway bikes and racing bikes and off-road bikes. Then there are scooters, which are another kind of motorcycle, one without a clutch. There are different kinds of scooters, too, urban scooters and highway scooters.

Only you can define what kind of riding you want to do. The first question is if you will ride two-up or in pairs, depending on how your lady wants to travel. Two-up? Get a cruiser, at least 1100cc, better a GoldWing. That's what they're for.

For a single rider on the highway, a smaller cruiser or a maxiscooter is just fine. There are also adventure touring machines like the V-Strom or different BMWs that are just as comfortable, and in fact any motorcycle can be set up comfortably with handlebar risers, aftermarket seats, etc. I have an 1100 V-Star and a 900 Vulcan as well as two 650 Burgmans and a 125 Vino. I also have an Aprilia 200 Scarbeo, a 250 Ninja and a Honda CB500 to ride. They are all very different, all fun in their own way. Some of them do not go on the highway. Others don't get ridden in town.

I love my V-Star. It is big and fat and silver, makes a nice sound as I motor along. It's a Silverado, decked out with windshield and bags, chromed out, rejetted with Jughugger pipes and a Kuryakyn scoop. It's a very nice bike, the bike I always wanted as a kid. My wife's Vulcan is a Classic, also appointed and modified for performance. They are lots of fun on the highway, but big and clunky around town, at least compared to a scooter.

I ride a scooter in the city. My Burgman on crosstown trips and our Vino when I don't have to go on a freeway. A lighter bike is fun, but a clutch is not a thing to put up with in traffic.

We ride our cruisers on day trips and weekend overnighters to some destination 250 miles away. They're fun for that, and there are lots of other riders out there with similar bikes, some even Harleys. For longer trips we go out on the Burgmans, simply because they are better.

Why? Better weather protection, more storage, longer range, better mileage, less vibration, less fatigue, Twist the grip and they go, effortlessly. They handle better through mountain corners than the cruisers and go faster, quicker, with less buffeting at high speed. My favourite switch is the adjustable windshield although my wife likes the heated seat. They are hard to beat.

BTW, don't get wierded out by the scooter thing. People don't know what they're looking at, least of all other riders. They don't know what they're missing, until you start to tell them, then they are amazed at what it is and can do.

Anyway, those are my random thoughts. Whatever bike you choose, you will enjoy it.

Regards
Scott Fraser
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:13 AM   #20
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Some good responses here.

Sportbike riders don't understand cruiser riders who don't understand dual-sport riders who don't understand HD only riders who don't understand scooter riders. Once you put a DILLIGAF sticker on the bike of YOUR choice, it just doesn't matter as much anymore.

Just grab something - anything and start riding. You'll soon figure out what makes you happiest.

MiniBike screwed with this post 02-11-2013 at 09:20 AM
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:05 PM   #21
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So many bikes, so little time.

So true.




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Old 02-11-2013, 02:05 PM   #22
Motovista
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You will be more in control of the vehicle faster on a Scooter, but there are advantages to motorcycles if you really are looking for a long distance touring bike. The significantly greater unsprung mass on a scooter means you are going to feel variances in the road much more, and the feet forward seating position may cause problems with your lower back on long rides. By putting your legs under you, touring and dual sport motorcycles allow your legs to absorb a lot of the bumps and ruts that otherwise travel up the bike and into your back. Scooters don't brake as well as Motorcycles, especially in adverse conditions, again primarily due to the difference in unsprung mass.
OTOH, if you buy a vehicle based on that one trip you might take at some point, you are less likely to get something that you can just jump on and ride. There is a lot to be said for putting your wife on the back of the Vespa and going downtown for dinner, or going to the store and putting six bags of groceries into your scooter. You will more than likely get a lot more practical use out of the scooter. Most people don't hop on the 'wing and go down to the store if they need more milk, but it makes sense on a scooter.
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:25 PM   #23
hugemoth
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I'm 59 and have ridden both since I was a kid. Lots of touring on everything from an old Vespa Rally 200 to a Goldwing. For serious long distance 2 up touring it's hard to beat the Goldwing because that's exactly what it was designed for. Lots of carrying capacity and luggage space. It is big and heavy though so not the best starter bike.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:20 PM   #24
creighta
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I started on a 150 Chinese crapper and have worked my way into a 400 cc scoot. Every time I have decided to buy a motorcycle I managed to migrate back to the scooter world.

Funny, you actually start to enjoy the comments after a while.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:58 PM   #25
cdwise
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I did approximately 10,000 miles in long trips (defined as more than 500 miles per trip, including a 3,700 and 4,480 mile trip ) on 500 cc scooters a BV 500 and Scarabeo 500. We used to have a Burgman but its ergonomics didn't fit me as well as the more upright seating position. Nor did my husband or I care for its slow speed handling or moving it around the garage. I also don't like its foot forward seating position. Too much weight on my tailbone. The standard upright position of the more traditional scooter style (aka Italian vs Asian) is just much more comfortable. After 350-400 miles on a Burgman my ass was tired and my knee would hurt but I've done 680 on the Scarabeo in one day and while tired was not in pain. The only time we ride two up is if we are going to take to or pick up from the shop or a bike/scooter has broken down.

I also ride with a women's riding group where the majority of riders are on Harleys or other cruisers. I rarely get grief from any motorcycle rider but then when I've gone riding the twisties with folks on BMWs, Yamahas and Harleys I'm not the slowest either. Real riders respect others on two wheels regardless of what they ride. That goes for cruiser riders, sports bike riders and dual sport riders though each may well rib the others over their choice.

Around Houston I mostly ride a smaller Vespa that is still freeway capable but small enough I can park it in places you would never be allowed to park a motorcycle even a Ninja because "its a scooter" so therefore more acceptable to park next to a bike rack for some reason. Between the various scooter I put on about 14,000 miles a year on them.

I have no problem riding a motorcycle or shifting (the ATV I ride is motorcycle shift) especially since I don't care for engine braking (half of the year I'm riding in the Rockies) so the lack of engine braking isn't an issue. For me I prefer the lighter weight and more flexible foot placement options as well as the lack of a hot engine between my legs when I'm riding in Texas.

Neither my husband or I care what others think about what we ride. I don't care to ride dirt and my husband has taken our Sports City scooter down dirt tracks normally used by jeeps and dirt bikes with loose sand that others have turned back from on motorcycles with no problems other than a cloud of sand being thrown up. Though you wouldn't want to take one into real back country off road riding.

The advice to ride what fits you is the best you can follow and I wouldn't start with a Burgman 650 as a new rider because of its weight. Get something lighter to start with. Many of the newer 350cc scooters are good touring bikes and easily capable of running all day at 80+ mph have longer maintenance intervals and weigh hundreds of pounds less.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:11 PM   #26
JerryH
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I just got into scooters a few years ago and fell in love. I started out on a dirt bike at age 8. My first street bike was a Suzuki GT380 2 stroke triple. After that I got a brand new Suzuki GS450L, a cruiser, and have been hooked on cruisers ever since, because of their comfort. I still have a dual sport bike, and I've had a few sport bikes, but never kept them very long because the sport bike riding position causes to much pain for me. I've had cruisers from a Rebel 250 to a Vulcan 1500. On a motorcycle you get bigger wheels, a manual transmission, a front mounted engine, and the gas tank up on top right in front of you, compared to a step through design with a scooter. My biggest gripe with smaller scooters (my favorite kind) is that they lack the gearing to ride in the mountains and keep the rpms up to avoid lugging the engine. On a motorcycle you can downshift and keep the engine running in the powerband. A manual transmission has a much wider gear range from top to bottom than a CVT transmission. I have a 50cc 2 stroke 2 speed moped that will climb mountains way better than my 125cc scooters, because first gear is super low. Your pretty much moving at a bicycle pace, but the engine is spinning where it should be with such a load on it.
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:50 AM   #27
John Bentall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdwise View Post
I did approximately 10,000 miles in long trips (defined as more than 500 miles per trip, including a 3,700 and 4,480 mile trip ) on 500 cc scooters a BV 500 and Scarabeo 500. We used to have a Burgman but its ergonomics didn't fit me as well as the more upright seating position. Nor did my husband or I care for its slow speed handling or moving it around the garage. I also don't like its foot forward seating position. Too much weight on my tailbone. The standard upright position of the more traditional scooter style (aka Italian vs Asian) is just much more comfortable. After 350-400 miles on a Burgman my ass was tired and my knee would hurt but I've done 680 on the Scarabeo in one day and while tired was not in pain. The only time we ride two up is if we are going to take to or pick up from the shop or a bike/scooter has broken down.

I also ride with a women's riding group where the majority of riders are on Harleys or other cruisers. I rarely get grief from any motorcycle rider but then when I've gone riding the twisties with folks on BMWs, Yamahas and Harleys I'm not the slowest either. Real riders respect others on two wheels regardless of what they ride. That goes for cruiser riders, sports bike riders and dual sport riders though each may well rib the others over their choice.

Around Houston I mostly ride a smaller Vespa that is still freeway capable but small enough I can park it in places you would never be allowed to park a motorcycle even a Ninja because "its a scooter" so therefore more acceptable to park next to a bike rack for some reason. Between the various scooter I put on about 14,000 miles a year on them.

I have no problem riding a motorcycle or shifting (the ATV I ride is motorcycle shift) especially since I don't care for engine braking (half of the year I'm riding in the Rockies) so the lack of engine braking isn't an issue. For me I prefer the lighter weight and more flexible foot placement options as well as the lack of a hot engine between my legs when I'm riding in Texas.

Neither my husband or I care what others think about what we ride. I don't care to ride dirt and my husband has taken our Sports City scooter down dirt tracks normally used by jeeps and dirt bikes with loose sand that others have turned back from on motorcycles with no problems other than a cloud of sand being thrown up. Though you wouldn't want to take one into real back country off road riding.

The advice to ride what fits you is the best you can follow and I wouldn't start with a Burgman 650 as a new rider because of its weight. Get something lighter to start with. Many of the newer 350cc scooters are good touring bikes and easily capable of running all day at 80+ mph have longer maintenance intervals and weigh hundreds of pounds less.
This lovely couple have transcended that phase of "riding/operating a motorcycle" and are into that higher plane of travelling on two wheels or "motorcycling". In this phase you take whatever PTW is at hand and plan an appropriate trip within its and their capabilities, taking most of their pleasure from being out on the open road.
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:14 AM   #28
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I went from a scooter as my first vehicle then getting a supermoto allot to be learnt but i do miss the simplicity of just twisting the throttle and enjoying the road not thinking about how i should enter this corner, but for now i'll stick to motorbikes until I can have both.

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Old 02-12-2013, 11:23 AM   #29
klaviator
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I rode motorcycles for over 30 years before getting my first scooter. Currently I have 2 motorcycles and 2 scooters. They both have their advantages. I have not experienced anyone laughing or looking down at me when on a scooter. I have impressed a few motorcycle riders when I kept up with them on their 1000cc bikes.

As someone else posted, just go out any get something to start on. Motorcycle or scooter doesn't really matter, as long as it has 2 wheels and a motor. I would recommend buying something small and used to start with. Ride it for a while and then you will be in a better position to know what you really want.

BTW, I bought my latest, an Aprilia Sport City 250 as a 2 up touring bike. Here's some of my ride reports on my 250:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=693143
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=694932
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=803404

Personally I think smaller bikes are more fun. They are definitely easier to handle. Read my ride reports and you will see that a 250cc scooter is more capable than most people think.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:38 AM   #30
klx250sfguy
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I have owned both. Been riding since 1990. Don't expect your first bike or scooter to be perfect. If it is, you're lucky. You will learn from experience. If you don't like what you're riding, sell it and start over. If you can afford more than one machine, then get one of each: a motorcycle and a scooter.

If you get a chance to test ride bikes at a "demo days" event, go for it. I have participated in BMW, Honda and Harley demo. They are great fun and will help you decide.

My $.02.
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