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Old 03-02-2013, 07:27 AM   #16
John Fabian
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SYM HD 200 Evo

I am looking at the SYM HD 200 Evo as a great value for money scooter right now. I prefer large wheels to small and the 171cc engine size is just right for me. I see some others on here have recommended it too. Happy trails.
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Old 03-02-2013, 09:52 AM   #17
cdwise
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Genuine scooters are extremely reliable and even the 125cc is capable of handling 55-60 easily. They are also very durable as my son is still riding our 2006 as his daily transport for school and work. He's been riding it since he was 15 but will lose it in a few months to his younger brother who turns 15 in a few months. Its a perfect in town and non-highway scoot. Over the 6.5 years we've had it other than routine maintenance our only repairs have been replacing a broken mirror (my son banged it against a wall parking too close to it) and plugging the horn back in when the connector came lose (probably when my son switched out the front panel for one of a different color). Body parts are cheap, you can replace every bit on the scoot for less than $300 and the engine just goes on and on.

I'd put Genuine (PGO), Kymco and Sym on par with the Honda bikes in quality and better bang for the buck. Parts are readily available for Buddys and other Genuine scoots shipped from Chicago and finding someone to work on them has been easy. Our local Houston dealership didn't give me any of that "fees" for this and that. I paid list price and I think a $50 or something like that paperwork fee. Which was a lot better than the $250 dealer prep fee on my Aprilia Scarabeo 500 plus state tax/registration which the dealer doesn't get so I don't count it. Out the door price was about 12% over list including fees and taxes on the Scarabeo but I really don't remember on the Buddy since I bought it new in 2006. So if your dealer is looking for 40% more then find someone else.

At the time I bought the Buddy the only scoot in a similar price range I considered was the Vino but performance and reviews swayed me to the Buddy and I'm very glad that's what I bought. I've been on rides with folks on Vinos and the same size Buddy out performs them considerably. I'd buy another in a heartbeat.

One of the nice things about the 125-200cc range of small wheeled scoots is that they are extremely easy to move around which makes loading and unloading them from a truck, versahauler or trailer very easy. I can load one on a trailer or versahaulter myself, something I could never have done with safely with the Burgman we used to own.

Larger wheeled scoots like the Sym mentioned, Kymco Like/People or Aprilia Sports City, Scarabeo or BV are not as nimble but are better if you plan any highway riding but that doesn't sound like what you want to use the scoots for. Dealer support and parts for Sym are a bit harder to find right now since they just went through a US distributor change so I'd probably wait on buying one of them if you are concerned about getting service done.

I'd steer clear of Lance Cali for the reasons mentioned earlier. The Lance Cali is a knock off of the Aprilia Mojito which has been discontinued but used the Piaggio/Vespa/Aprilia 150cc engine so is pretty easy to still find parts for and I agree with your wife that it has classic good looks.
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Old 03-02-2013, 06:53 PM   #18
rv-rick
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Sounds like you're fulltimers. (sigh)
All of the recommendations above are spot on. I'm looking at a new Zuma myself.
The only down side to Genuine, if you want to call it that, is the fact that the warranty will not transfer to a second owner.
In my part of the country there aren't a lot of dealers for them.

Good luck, and never stop traveling.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:06 PM   #19
Dranrab Luap
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I read a few days ago that modern Zuma 125s are made in China FWIW.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:53 PM   #20
CaptnJim OP
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Thanks again for the replies. This morning, I checked the computer to see how many of the dealers had responded to my request for price quotes... a grand total of... one. The price was more in line with what I was thinking. My lovely wife was out shopping with our daughter, so I had to wait until this evening to discuss all of this. In the meantime, the salesman that we originally talked with at the Honda dealer (not the one who was a dumas) called, apologized for the other guy's behavior, and shot me an even better deal. I told him I'd get back to him by Monday.

So, we now have the game-playing out of the way. My wife has become completely sold on the PCX 150, but not particularly that dealership. Our experience with Hondas of all sorts over the years has been extremely good (7 bikes, 1 car, 3 outboards, 1 generator, a snow-blower, and a partridge in a pear tree). Western Honda (amongst others) never responded to my e-mail. The two used bikes suggested in a post here sound good, but are 2011 miles from our current location, and no plans to be in the South Carolina area anytime soon. The recommendations of the Taiwanese manufacturers is appreciated.

We are not full-time RVers, but divide our time between the RV, our boat, and a small "vacation home." Like most full-time RVers, though, we do go where "the weather suits our clothes." And it just seems like a couple scooters will fit in with that. We'll see. The question isn't "two wheels or four?" We know we like two wheels, it's just a matter of picking and fitting them into our traveling.

Turns out, the picking is tougher than our last purchase of a boat or a diesel truck... I did the research, we decided what fit our needs, made the purchase, and didn't look back. Of course, with those purchases, there were fewer model options, and we dealt with a hometown truck dealership and the boat factory. None of this game crap. No concern that we might get something that wasn't well-made. Yes, I know the price of admission for the scooters isn't as much, but it is tougher to put a value on enjoyment vs frustration.

Thanks again for the replies and suggestions. While I may not follow them all (my dear departed Mother always said I tend to be that way), this has been helpful.

Best wishes,
Captain Jim
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:07 PM   #21
gogogordy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hexnut View Post
I would disagree about the quality of the Taiwanese scooters. I would put the two Kymcos I have owned up against the Japanese or the Italians any day. Fit and finish is very good. They are also easy to service.

They never broke down or gave me any trouble what so ever. Spend some time on modern vespa and you will read countless post of people who were stranded on the road or had failures in general.

And parts for Kymcos are much cheaper than the other scooters and much more readily available. Kymco has more dealers in the US with the exception of Honda than any other brand. Around here most of the Honda dealers also sell Kymcos.

Kymco has around 600 dealers and plans to add 500 more.

http://www.dealernews.com/dealernews...0-more-dealers

Im going to have to agree about this, and SYM actually built hundreds of thousand of "Honda" products over the years, under contract with Honda.

And if you find a Yamaha VINO look very closely at the VIN plate, you'll likely find the words "Made in Taiwan" there.

Pre-conceived notions about the motorcycle industry based on 40 year old "knowledge"of it arent much good in today's world.

The japanese started farming out much of their PTW production to other countries like Taiwan when they were concentrating and transitioning on taking on the automobile business.
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:53 PM   #22
JerryH
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Nothing wrong with Taiwan made scoots. But just like the Japanese started farming out production to Taiwan, Taiwan is now doing the same thing with mainland China. BUT. I have not seen any evidence of quality issues because of this. It looks like the Taiwan companies run a tight ship, and have excellent quality control. My Vino 125 and Zuma 125 were made in Taiwan, and my former Kawasaki Eliminator 125 and KLR650 were made in Thailand. All are indistinguishable from Japanese made bikes. There are very few vehicle manufacturers that do not use Taiwan and Chinese made parts, even Rolls Royce.
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:58 PM   #23
gogogordy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
Nothing wrong with Taiwan made scoots. But just like the Japanese started farming out production to Taiwan, Taiwan is now doing the same thing with mainland China. BUT. I have not seen any evidence of quality issues because of this. It looks like the Taiwan companies run a tight ship, and have excellent quality control. My Vino 125 and Zuma 125 were made in Taiwan, and my former Kawasaki Eliminator 125 and KLR650 were made in Thailand. All are indistinguishable from Japanese made bikes. There are very few vehicle manufacturers that do not use Taiwan and Chinese made parts, even Rolls Royce.
And now a Korean and (to a lesser extent) Chinese assault on the automobile industry... (a holier grail profit-wise than PTW production I assume)
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Old 03-03-2013, 09:36 PM   #24
fullmetalscooter
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You might want to consider finding a new old stock honda pcx 125. Even though it's 4 years after the bank melt down there are still a wack of old new stock out there. 2 dealer where I live have at least 8 yahama c3 sitting around. The deals cost in 2011 for a pcx125 was 3069 bucks. you can see them list here for 2700 new pcx 125 and 3 grand for the 150. http://www.cycletrader.com/search-re...odelkeyword=1&
Just watch the shit with the fees. they can add 250 to 800 bucks depending If you go used consider the honda helix that are 800.00 to 2 grand used. Also there's a host of others to consider. Eg a couple of honda elite that range from 80cc to 250 cc. They run from 500 to 1400 bucks depending on what they are. Nice thing is if something happens to an old scooter your not going to go #($)* for more then a day.

$

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fullmetalscooter screwed with this post 03-03-2013 at 09:42 PM
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Old 03-04-2013, 04:02 AM   #25
MiniBike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptnJim View Post
Our experience with Hondas of all sorts over the years has been extremely good (7 bikes, 1 car, 3 outboards, 1 generator, a snow-blower, and a partridge in a pear tree).
This is similar to my history/experience and why I held out for a PS250 (also towed behind our Winnebago).

Have fun with whatever you choose.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:10 PM   #26
CaptnJim OP
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Getting close. I am waiting for one more dealer to respond to my request quote (they are closed on Sunday and Monday); they didn't respond on Saturday (sent the request on Friday afternoon). If I don't hear from them, I'll know they simply aren't interested, and make my decision. I have responded promptly to all who gave me a quote... seems to me to be the polite thing to do.

Thanks again for the comments and suggestions.

I'm hoping the whole idea of a couple scooters is going to be as much fun as we think. Reading through this forum has been enlightening. All these years on two wheels, and until recently, this wasn't on my radar.

Captain Jim
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:42 AM   #27
scootrboi
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I have a 1984 Honda 125 Elite that has never needed a valve adjustment, or anything else, except for clean out work when it sat for 17 years without running. The tailpipe is rusted. It runs like the day I bought it, except for the chinese enricher I put in it. It only starts when the temp is above 45 degrees. Only 12,000 miles on it. I don't like working on it, but the quality is remarkable. This is the scooter that started it all (modern twist and go).
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:13 PM   #28
CaptnJim OP
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Done deal. We pick up two PCX 150s tomorrow. I'm satisfied with the price (especially after getting offers over $1,000 per bike more), no pressure, no BS add-on charges.

I down-loaded the manual last night, and I'll deal with the valve adjustment intervals.

My thanks for the responses and recommendations here (esp JerryH for the PMs). We're looking forward to running these around!

Best wishes,
Captain Jim
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:06 PM   #29
MiniBike
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CONGRATULATIONS!



and welcome to scootin'
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Old 03-05-2013, 07:10 PM   #30
Warney
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Wise choice of Scooters, have fun!
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