ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Face plant
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-08-2013, 04:01 PM   #331
atokad
wan⋅der⋅lust
 
atokad's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: 6,450' above MSL
Oddometer: 2,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJS View Post
Unfortunately, true. Group I know was riding with a person who had a medical emergency (not bike related). Multiple spot 911s and new InReach (two way text) requests for air evac. Unfortunately it took the first responders 2 hours to get there and at that point there wasn't anything left to do Pretty tough experience for all those involved.

Something to keep in mind when on remote travels.
Sorry to hear that. Maybe a SAT phone would be good to have so that you can personally tell them how bad the air evac is needed?
__________________
2006 - Triumph Tiger
1995 XR650L
atokad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 05:43 PM   #332
Lutz
Killer Rabbit
 
Lutz's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: North Shore of Lake Superior
Oddometer: 1,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by atokad View Post
Sorry to hear that. Maybe a SAT phone would be good to have so that you can personally tell them how bad the air evac is needed?
That is a good idea too, but just because the caller says it is needed, doesn't mean they'll fly. They're not flying unless they get a request from a medical professional - that isn't likely to happen until said medical professional is on scene... Also they're probably not landing without a said professional on the ground with a verified safe landing zone. But the information you give by that call can make a huge difference in the response that follows.

And again, just because a medical professional requests them does not mean they'll actually come (availability, weather, landing zone, etc are all potential red lights). We recently had one example of a badly burned individual at my workplace, which happens to be rather remote location, but with a team of first responders on site. We even have an established safe landing zone on site. Life flight was definitely warranted, and was requested by the first responders within minutes of the event. However, the helicopter could not take off due to fog. So it was a long wait for the ambulance, followed by a series of long ambulance rides between hospitals. Sometimes the best option is not an option...

The absolute best thing you can do if you plan to ride in remote areas, is ride with partners and get some medical training of your own (first aid & CPR at a minimum, first responder even better). Be prepared to stabilize yourself (if you can) or riding partner(s) while you wait for help. And be prepared to wait a LONG time. The upside is if you're a first responder, you can call for med flight.
Lutz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 09:15 PM   #333
gbmaz
Power Newb
 
gbmaz's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Oddometer: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by atokad View Post
I was mainly thinking that such a remote area would would warrant a flight if 911 were dispatched via a Spot. If it had been an immediate life threatening situation, it seems to me that the ground response of 70-90 minutes was kind of long. I don't know the area but perhaps to dispatch the flight team and chopper may have been just as long.
The issue in remote areas in the west is that the places where it would be really nice to have helicopter evac readily available they are least likely. Search and Rescue is generally run by counties (often the sheriff with volunteers) and the cost of a chopper is prohibitive. There are quite a few counties many times the size of Rhode Island with populations less than 10,000 and much of the land is federal. So, no tax base to fund services. Any helicopter is going to be state police or Nationl Guard and might be several hours flight away.

70-90 minute response is amazing in the desert. In lots of places a 911 call to your home might be 45 minutes or more.

I have no illusions that my SPOT or a sat phone would get me a 30 minute response. My hope is that it might turn a 24 hour wait into 6-12 hours. Or at the very least make it easier to find my body.

Rural EMS have plenty to do responding to the problems of locals. A call from a distant call center that their customer, let's call him "Beemer Bill" (Bob's cousin), sent a call for help for unspecified reasons is not a priority above a sick kid or car accident. There have been a number of cases of SPOT users crying wolf nd that does not help. Look for the story about the hikers in the Grand Canyon a few years ago.

The bottom line is that a call to the local sheriffs personal phone and him summoning a helicoptor to come get still might take 3-5 hours to get you help. That is the reality. Ride accordingly and bring skilled friends you trust.
__________________
George Marsden
Los Alamos, NM

"You have never really lived until you have done something for someone who can never repay you."

gbmaz screwed with this post 06-08-2013 at 09:17 PM Reason: F'd up spellin'
gbmaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2013, 09:46 PM   #334
Dahveed
Sumo Biker!
 
Dahveed's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: North Texas
Oddometer: 5,547
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbmaz View Post
The issue in remote areas in the west is that the places where it would be really nice to have helicopter evac readily available they are least likely. Search and Rescue is generally run by counties (often the sheriff with volunteers) and the cost of a chopper is prohibitive. There are quite a few counties many times the size of Rhode Island with populations less than 10,000 and much of the land is federal. So, no tax base to fund services. Any helicopter is going to be state police or Nationl Guard and might be several hours flight away.

70-90 minute response is amazing in the desert. In lots of places a 911 call to your home might be 45 minutes or more.

I have no illusions that my SPOT or a sat phone would get me a 30 minute response. My hope is that it might turn a 24 hour wait into 6-12 hours. Or at the very least make it easier to find my body.

Rural EMS have plenty to do responding to the problems of locals. A call from a distant call center that their customer, let's call him "Beemer Bill" (Bob's cousin), sent a call for help for unspecified reasons is not a priority above a sick kid or car accident. There have been a number of cases of SPOT users crying wolf nd that does not help. Look for the story about the hikers in the Grand Canyon a few years ago.

The bottom line is that a call to the local sheriffs personal phone and him summoning a helicoptor to come get still might take 3-5 hours to get you help. That is the reality. Ride accordingly and bring skilled friends you trust.
Nothing is fool proof and you're right, everything is slowed to the speed of the weakest link, and that is often the resources on the ground. Having an on-star like system that automatically senses an accident and dispatches help is no good if help is one sheriff deputy and he's swamped on some other priority. If your emergency is related to some sort of widespread event (like severe weather) you'll be one of many seeking help. One of the hazards of riding giant dirt bikes in the middle of nowhere is that you're on your own to a certain extent. That is also one of the appeals for many here.

I personally know Beemer Bob and here is his thoughts on SPOT. Forgive me if this is 205.

If you're too lazy to read this, it basically says it took a long time to get help due to the ground resources. Bob is still a believer in SPOT because they did exactly what they said they would do.

I carry a SPOT and I even have an PLB registered with the NOAA. But its also good to be self sufficient and avoid the need for help.

I was recently riding in the Big Bend area of Texas and was told by a local that the ambulance will NOT leave the pavement. I'm guessing the sheriff has some sort of trucks that could be used to transport an injured person to the pavement, but that means help is a very long time in coming. If your problem is severe, you're a long way from help.

So, the short answer is ride with a doctor and have provisions to handle your own emergency.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by summerinmaine
When you get too old to serve as a bad example, you can always give bad advice.
'13 R1200GS
'08 WR250R
Dahveed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 03:57 AM   #335
Trane Francks
Studly Adventurer
 
Trane Francks's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Oddometer: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed View Post
So, the short answer is ride with a doctor and have provisions to handle your own emergency.
A GS set up as a MASH unit.
Trane Francks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2013, 06:21 AM   #336
gbmaz
Power Newb
 
gbmaz's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Los Alamos, NM
Oddometer: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahveed View Post

I personally know Beemer Bob and here is his thoughts on SPOT. Forgive me if this is 205.

If you're too lazy to read this, it basically says it took a long time to get help due to the ground resources. Bob is still a believer in SPOT because they did exactly what they said they would do.
I had read most of what Bob had on his blog in this thread:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=613416

His conclusions about the SPOT were accurate and Informative. The rants he made there and in other places about the incompetence of local search and rescue were uncalled for. I am pretty sure that the average income in McKinley County where he crashed is less than the cost of his GS.

You are 100% right about self reliance. Need to find me some doctor friends to ride with....MD kind of doctors not PhD kind like I ride with now.
__________________
George Marsden
Los Alamos, NM

"You have never really lived until you have done something for someone who can never repay you."
gbmaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2013, 08:08 AM   #337
WhicheverAnyWayCan
Deaf Biker
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Seven Springs NC
Oddometer: 752
Hi Joe! First of all, I have to say WOW! Thank god you walked away from this with just a bruise. Well, maybe two bruises? Physical and maybe pride? Thank for sharing your experience with us all and hopefully I have used your story to convince my family to throw in SPOT as part of christmas shopping list as I prepare for my RTW.

2 months before your crash, I climbed up that hill with just one hand! Before the creek bed (after swasey cabin), I had a bad crash I injured my left hand and warped the handlebar with right end moved forward and left end pushed backward. It was difficult for me to steer the bike with one hand on a messed up handlebar riding through sandy creek bed (I noticed it was a bit solid in your video because it rained pervious day the dirt was a bit solid?) Once I made it out of the pass I was so thrilled I screamed my lung out as if I had just won because doing that with one hand on a warped handlebar was no easy feat.

With all the debates about technique riding.. Well, sometime the riding technique doesn't mean nothing when you hit certain point of being in a tough situation. It is easy to say what was done wrong when you should do this or that but it is a whole different ballgame when a person is in middle of a rough riding.. From the look at your video, you apparently almost lose control when you went cross first rock you were holding onto the handlebar then on second bump, you made a hard left turn so you don't crash into the wall on your right you had no choice but to attempt to balance yourself and your bike by going straight(over the cliff) and probably pick up a little on throttle (which is a common rule of maintaining the speed when making a left or right turn or at curve). I believe you were in unavoidable situation that none of the off-road training school can help you with. Other option would be to just crash right there without going over the cliff but I believe that is usually the option many riders don't want to consider.

Please note that I have read up to Page 14 so I missed the rest of the debate up to this point. I'm just glad you were fortunately enough to walk away with just a bruise. I'll heed the advice if I ever walk away from accident like this to buy lottery ticket right away, and if I win I shall donate partial of funds to ADVrider.
WhicheverAnyWayCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 03:30 PM   #338
ER70S-2
Beastly Adventurer
 
ER70S-2's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: SE Denver-ish
Oddometer: 5,459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooch View Post
Good job on not dying.
__________________
2004 DR650: 61,211 miles
2013 WR250R

SUZUKI DR650SE INFORMATION INDEX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
ER70S-2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 03:59 PM   #339
UtahDirt
What happened to the Sun?
 
UtahDirt's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Eutah
Oddometer: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trane Francks View Post
A GS set up as a MASH unit.
Nice when it runs out of gas with a bad fuel strip
__________________
09 K1300S sold miss the Lava Orange
13K1600GT cause I like a Warm Butt
13 G Water pumper
14 Harley Ultra Limited Water Pumper
UtahDirt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 06:08 PM   #340
Rockcat
LDA
 
Rockcat's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 379
That was painful to watch on a big screen. Glad you are ok.
Rockcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 09:53 AM   #341
txtallywhacker
screw schedules
 
txtallywhacker's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: evans, co
Oddometer: 108
it looks to me after you turned the handle bars to the left, there may have been so much weight on the back that it took the front tire a bit longer than normal to find the grip, requiring you to keep the bars turned. then by the time it caught good you had used up the whole width of the trail, then went flying.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by drrags View Post
So I sashay on down to the local sanatorium with a cup full of poop.
txtallywhacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2013, 04:46 PM   #342
greggNJ
wannabe adventurer
 
greggNJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: NJ....for now
Oddometer: 100
Wow! Just came across this on YouTube. Glad you're alright.
__________________
Gregg
'03 F650GS Dakar-SOLD
2012 JKU Rubicon
greggNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2013, 02:35 PM   #343
blues bob
Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: lafayette,co
Oddometer: 89
slow motion

What a story!!! If I wanted to scare the crap out of myself even more, could someone kindly tell me how to initiate slow motion?

thanks
blues bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2013, 04:39 PM   #344
abhibeckert
Beastly Adventurer
 
abhibeckert's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Cairns, Australia
Oddometer: 1,432
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDutchman View Post
I agree..not covering the levers in technical sections is unwise.
Same here. In this specific case god only knows. But if you want to avoid riding off a cliff then you need to have your brakes and clutch covered during technical sections.

And to train yourself properly you also need to do it in non-technical riding. Basically the brake and clutch should always be covered, even on an empty highway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDutchman View Post
I rode a Suzuki back in the 80s...probably the same suspension as yours. A KTM would have handled that drop no problem:)
I agree with that too. One of my worst crashes was when I hit a massive rock and my XR (basically the same stock suspension as a DR?) bounced up and would have backflipped if it hadn't hit me in the chest hard enough to fracture my ribs despite hitting a well padded/armoured area.

A few years later I hit a rock the same size at the same speed on my KTM and the front wheel probably never got more than an inch into the air. Just rode over the rock. And my KTM's suspension is a few inches shorter than the XR I had.
__________________
We're building a community to help noobs choose the right oil: Stack Exchange's Proposed Motorcycle Community

abhibeckert screwed with this post 07-10-2013 at 04:45 PM
abhibeckert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2013, 12:03 PM   #345
dumbazz650
Adventurer
 
dumbazz650's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: NV
Oddometer: 19
Glad you survived the crash!

Damn, Joe... I'm glad you lived to tell the tale!

I think we all have that nightmare where we wake up just as the bike goes over the edge. Thanks for sharing your story, and it's nice to see how that nightmare ends.

Live large, and Ride safe.
dumbazz650 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014