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Old 03-06-2013, 05:15 PM   #16
TrashCan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveoneshot View Post
Cagers will often try and be polite to motorcycles, especially in the cities and urban situations. They'll wave you on , thinking they are doing you a good deed. Wrong !! I never go on a wave.




True. Most times they don't see the big picture.
I would rather to make my own decision pertaining to going or stopping.


I trust me more that anyone else on the street.
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Old 03-06-2013, 05:27 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by bumbeen View Post
Thanks for the tips. I think I read recently though that this is a bad idea, but I can't remember why.

Just that you always want to have an "OUT" so you do not become the meat in a sammich if they fail to see the car as well...
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Old 03-06-2013, 05:34 PM   #18
daveinva
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveoneshot View Post
Cagers will often try and be polite to motorcycles, especially in the cities and urban situations. They'll wave you on , thinking they are doing you a good deed. Wrong !! I never go on a wave.
A potentially helpful tip for this (frustrating) situation: while waving *them* along, turn your head to look away from them. For some reason that almost always breaks the standoff and forces them to move first. (Also works on pedestrians, too!)
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:11 PM   #19
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When approaching a car awaiting a lefthand turn across my lane or a sitting car waiting to pull out at an intersecrion (the two classic killer situations) I give the handlebars a little wiggle so the headlight moves laterally and helps catch their eye. An oncoming headlight can otherwise just appear stationary.

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Old 03-06-2013, 06:41 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by duck View Post
Good aux lighting that stands out in traffic makes a WORLD of difference in not getting run over. See my avatar. That said, I still ride as if I'm invisible.

#3 above. Not only re-apply flashing brake lights when cars approaching from behind at stoplights but is also good for getting tailgaters to back off. That and standing up.

Speed up/slow down to minimize being in cagers' blind spots.

It was nice riding with an old laser printer strapped to the back. No tailgaters period.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:24 PM   #21
B.Curvin
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Pay attention to the heads of drivers in front of you. You can usually tell where they are going before they know where they are going. And you can also usually tell whether they know you are there or not. I can't count the number of times I've gotten out of the way BEFORE a car started coming over on me.

Stay right except to pass. More side to side motion helps get you noticed (I do a lot of passing ).

KLRs are too slow to get you OUT of trouble on the highway.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:26 PM   #22
390beretta OP
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Great tips everyone. Please keep them coming.
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Old 03-06-2013, 11:05 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Just that you always want to have an "OUT" so you do not become the meat in a sammich if they fail to see the car as well...
I found what I was remembering, it's on pg 120 of proficient motorcycling. You do not want to do this because the vehicle to your side may try turning down the side street with you in the way. The example given is you are on a one-way street in the left lane, and the car in the right lane thinks its a two-way and tries to turn left over you. So it isn't a hard and fast rule. On highways I won't necessarily ride right next to them but I will hang maybe a few meters off their bumper in the other lane while going through an intersection with vehicles waiting.

When I was living in Illinois I saw Mexicans turning right from the left lane and left from the right lane all the time. In Alabama they like to stop at flashing yellows and just sit there while the cross-traffic stares at them.
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Old 03-06-2013, 11:55 PM   #24
windmill
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Its not that complicated, relax, pay attention, don't be stupid.

Most of the drama is from those who refuse to accept that they don't personally own the road and need excuses to justify their behavior................or they suck at riding and just don't know it.

Riders love to talk trash about bad drivers, but every statistic and study proves riders are by far their own worst enemy.

The most important safety tool?



Good judgment.
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Old 03-07-2013, 05:58 AM   #25
390beretta OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumbeen View Post
I found what I was remembering, it's on pg 120 of proficient motorcycling. You do not want to do this because the vehicle to your side may try turning down the side street with you in the way. The example given is you are on a one-way street in the left lane, and the car in the right lane thinks its a two-way and tries to turn left over you. So it isn't a hard and fast rule. On highways I won't necessarily ride right next to them but I will hang maybe a few meters off their bumper in the other lane while going through an intersection with vehicles waiting.

When I was living in Illinois I saw Mexicans turning right from the left lane and left from the right lane all the time. In Alabama they like to stop at flashing yellows and just sit there while the cross-traffic stares at them.
Well, I still find it to be a good strategy much of the time. As another poster said, "the best strategy is good judgement"

I was in the right lane the other day preparing to turn right. A woman on a cell phone, pulling out of a gas station, looked right at me, pulled right out in front of me and made a right. Because I was vigilant, not going too fast and using good judgement I was able to stop and it wasn't even an emergency stop but damn!
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:03 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
Its not that complicated, relax, pay attention, don't be stupid.

Most of the drama is from those who refuse to accept that they don't personally own the road and need excuses to justify their behavior................or they suck at riding and just don't know it.

Riders love to talk trash about bad drivers, but every statistic and study proves riders are by far their own worst enemy.

The most important safety tool?



Good judgment.
I'd have to disagree with some of your statement. You're right statistically in certain kinds of accidents riders are their own worst enemy. Excessive speed, entering corners too hot, target fixation, etc. But if you look at accidents involving cagers pulling out in front of riders, whether a left turn situation or from a side street, I think the statistics will show that the cagers are almost always at fault.
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:50 AM   #27
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1. Trust your gut when predicting vehicles you are overtaking. Logic gets you trouble when making judgement calls. For example, I was leaving an intersection. There was a car in the far right lane about 300' ahead. I was in far left lane with one lane separation. He turned on his signal but stayed in the right lane. My gut told me he was going to come all they way across. Logic said it would not happen. When I was 100' from the car, he abruptly came across two lanes into my lane.

2. Watch for tar snakes. The wheels will slide a little when the pavement gets hot and the snakes melt. They are also slippery in the rain.

3. Keep your mind clear. It is safer to ride when you are just focusing on the ride.

4. On the Highway, expect deer to jump out regardless of the location. Deer are everywhere. They jump out at all times of the day, but are harder to see when it is dark.

5. On the Highway, keep an eye out for Retreads. They fall off of Semis.

6. On they highway, stay away from semis or accelerate to get away from them. Dump trucks are equally dangerous.

7. Be caution around vehicles with tinted windows.

8. Watch out for Minivans and SUVs. They obstruct your vision. Additionally, they have tend to drive unpredictably.

9. If you can see in the vehicles, look for a hand next to the ear. If they are messing with a cell phone they will be a hazard. You need to distance yourself from these drivers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
I'd like to propose a thread relative to the above. Hope a lot of experienced riders, especially those who do a lot of time in busy metropolitan areas and those who ride the slab will contribute. Here are some of mine: (I ride a lot of surface streets in Phx, AZ)

1. Always watch your mirrors and be aware (head glance) of what's behind you and how close.

2. Always slow down a bit at major intersections and cover the brakes.

3. If your urban environment has cross-walk timers for pedestrians, look at them, they'll give you an idea of when the light will change.

4. We've all had the experience of getting to a light just as the yellow turns on. Check your mirrors before deciding what action to take. More than us have had the experience of being rear-ended by some asshat who "assumed" that you were going to run the yellow and he was too.

5. Be hyper alert at any cross streets and cagers in left turn lane. Don't assume that they see you.

6. When convenient/possible, go thru an intersection with cagers running interference for you. On one or both sides.....cagers seem to see them better than us.

On the highway:

1. Don't be afraid to run a bit over the average flow. Try to find a niche, in between "pods" of cagers many of whom are doing the speed limit and some are doing a bit more. Then there are those who are doing a "lot" more and seem to think the HOV lane has no limit.....why I personally avoid it.

2. When entering a major highway: Try to look back and "judge" where there might be a convenient empty space to slip into. Also, try not to be close behind other cagers, many of who haven't a clue how to merge and are likely to jam you up big time.

OK, those are a few of mine, hope others will add to.
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Old 03-07-2013, 10:55 AM   #28
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On the highway I tend to either stick where no cars are and if heavy traffic ill usually blip the throttle a little bit. Ive had people make eye contact with me and a few hundred feet down cut me off. And the ironic thing about that is they had the yellow "watch for motorcycles" sticker on their car. Always look at the cars actions but more importantly what the driver is doing inside the car.

In the city at 4 way stops I start to roll when its my turn and if everyone knows im going gun it out of there. yes ive had to pull some brake lock ups doing that but its better than getting tboned by a 5k pound truck.In the neighborhoods if I see someone backing out of their driveway I get as far away from them as possible. Another trick is when you are leaving first thing if your in a low speed zone <40mph carve the road to help warm up the tires more. I personally try to run a super sticky tire on the back just incase I need that little bit of traction.

This probably doesn't belong her but its a common rule of thumb in my book. If you pick up a nail or something like that only ride on a plug to get you home. on any bike ive had if I find any holes in either tire shes parked until I get a new tire. remember that in a car if one tire blows you still got 3 more but on a bike youll only have 1 so if your front goes I hope you can wheelie it the rest of the way home. just my 2 cents
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:19 AM   #29
blk-betty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
Its not that complicated, relax, pay attention, don't be stupid.
This!

I really don't drive my car(s) any differnet than my bikes.

What most are sying seems like common sense and what I do without even thinking about. When it gets to the point that these tips don't come naturally it will be time to quit riding.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:19 PM   #30
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 390beretta View Post
But if you look at accidents involving cagers pulling out in front of riders, whether a left turn situation or from a side street, I think the statistics will show that the cagers are almost always at fault.

... And it is easily avoidable (preventable) by the rider.


Does it really matter whose fault it is? It is the RIDERS responsibility to avoid them... OR better yet prevent it by NOT riding straight down the road.


Add Lateral motion so their brains can see you and this issue is "statistically" turned into a NON-issue.

Cater to how humans see things or have them violate your lane.
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