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Old 03-29-2013, 08:42 AM   #91
steelerider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
I agree with everything except the high beams.

They should only be used with bikes that have weak headlights. Most of todays bikes have very bright lights, their high beams will mask your turn signals, make it very difficult to judge your speed and distance, and interfere with the ability of others to observe whats near you.
The goal is to be seen without creating issues for yourself for others, forcing others to look away is not a productive way to be "seen".
There are so many intelligent, responsible, effective options, there is no excuse for irresponsible use of high beams.

Good rule of thumb,
If a driver can't see the turn signals, or see which way the rider is looking, the lights are too bright.



IMO, the words "I don't care" don't belong in a motorcyclists vocabulary, we're too vulnerable to not care about every decision we make, these days its unwise seek negative attention.
Hmm. Never thought about the high beam obscuring the signals.... good point.
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Old 03-29-2013, 09:47 AM   #92
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Originally Posted by steelerider View Post
Hmm. Never thought about the high beam obscuring the signals.... good point.
Depending upon light conditions your high beam can obscure your entire bike. You want to make yourself stand out against the background. If the background is bright, your high beam may just help you disappear. (Some spy planes had bright lights underneath to even out their overall brightness when seen against the sky)

I have also come across a winger with so many incredibly bright lights I literally could not tell that he was stopped with his left turn signal on and a half-dozen other bikes lined up behind him. I slowed as I approached him so I could try to see what the heck was going on, which he took as a sign that I was letting him go and the group made a left turn in front of me. Then the idiots all stopped dead, blocking the road when they realized I wasn't continuing to slow.
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Old 03-29-2013, 06:18 PM   #93
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Ride it like you stole it. People will definately notice you.

News Release from: Oregon State Police

UPDATE #3: MAN SOUGHT FOLLOWING INJURY MOTORCYCLE HIT & RUN CRASH WEDNESDAY ON INTERSTATE 205 OFF RAMP IN CUSTODY (PHOTO)

Posted: March 29th, 2013 11:59 AM



A man sought by Oregon State Police (OSP) following Wednesday afternoon's injury hit-and-run motorcycle-involved crash at the Johnson Creek Boulevard off ramp from Interstate 205 is in custody.

ANDREW JOSEPH PULVER, age 29, was arrested by Portland police March 29, 2013 at approximately 12:15 a.m. and lodged at the Multnomah County Justice Center. PULVER was sought after being identified as the operator of a stolen motorcycle involved in a crash March 27, 2013 in which he was reportedly operating recklessly southbound on Interstate 205 and crashed into the back of a stopped vehicle at the bottom of the Johnson Creek Boulevard off ramp. PULVER, who was injured, fled on foot from the crash scene. Arriving officers searched the area for several hours but didn't find him.

OSP troopers are at the jail interviewing PULVER. Charges will be forwarded at a later time. No other details available at this time.

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Old 04-03-2013, 09:03 AM   #94
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1)Don't loiter next to an 18 wheelers tires
2)If you keep thinking that car will see you and stop, he won't.
3)Don't approach cagers at >15mph over their speed.
4)Get a headlight modulator.*
5)Get a brake modulator.

*Added benefit: many think you are the police and pull over to let you by.
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Old 04-03-2013, 04:21 PM   #95
slartidbartfast
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Originally Posted by ai4px View Post
1)Don't loiter next to an 18 wheelers tires
2)If you keep thinking that car will see you and stop, he won't.
3)Don't approach cagers at >15mph over their speed.
4)Get a headlight modulator.*
5)Get a brake modulator.

*Added benefit: many think you are the police and pull over to let you by.
4) Headlight modulators are ok for attracting attention IMO but have a number of drawbacks. I ride with several people who USED to have them but who have mostly switched to using additional running lights to create a triangle of lights or other eye-catching pattern. Also I noted when riding with them that I did not typically notice the modulation with only a quick glance in my mirror. There have been numerous anecdotes where people have had other motorists behave unexpectedly, presumably from thinking they were or might have been being flashed at. Finally, a headlamp modulator is useless at night so you should have an alternate strategy anyway.

5) Auxilliary flasshing LEDs are a better alternative to brake light modulation IMO. Apart from anything else, they are an additional brake light rather than replacing the OEM, thus adding redundancy rather than introducing an additional potential for failure - Especially important on bikes with a single brake/tail light bulb.
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Old 04-03-2013, 04:59 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slartidbartfast View Post
4) Headlight modulators are ok for attracting attention IMO but have a number of drawbacks. I ride with several people who USED to have them but who have mostly switched to using additional running lights to create a triangle of lights or other eye-catching pattern. Also I noted when riding with them that I did not typically notice the modulation with only a quick glance in my mirror. There have been numerous anecdotes where people have had other motorists behave unexpectedly, presumably from thinking they were or might have been being flashed at. Finally, a headlamp modulator is useless at night so you should have an alternate strategy anyway.

5) Auxilliary flasshing LEDs are a better alternative to brake light modulation IMO. Apart from anything else, they are an additional brake light rather than replacing the OEM, thus adding redundancy rather than introducing an additional potential for failure - Especially important on bikes with a single brake/tail light bulb.
I've run modulators for many years without any problem. They just flat out work for me. Those who don't like them seem to express opinions that either have no basis in fact or sound like excuses not to use them because they're ashamed to do so.

I do have auxiliary rear lights instead of strobing the brake light itself. But I have no incandescent lamps anywhere. Those that were have been converted to LEDs which don't burn out.
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:30 AM   #97
slartidbartfast
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Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
I've run modulators for many years without any problem. They just flat out work for me. Those who don't like them seem to express opinions that either have no basis in fact or sound like excuses not to use them because they're ashamed to do so.
There's no doubt that they work. Based upon first-hand experience, I believe there are better alternatives, however. Main drawback is modulator being useless at night. Also does not work with HID.

Quote:
I do have auxiliary rear lights instead of strobing the brake light itself. But I have no incandescent lamps anywhere. Those that were have been converted to LEDs which don't burn out.
I have also converted some lights to LED - but not all. I particularly like LED turn signals because they turn on and off faster and don't cause headlamp to dim. In my experience, LEDs CAN be less reliable than incandescent. I have seen controllers/regulators fail, circuit boards partially fail, ultra-low temp solder fail and all LEDs fall out of lights mounted on engine crash bars (strange one that), heavy LED unit loosen lamp socket and fail to make connection, etc. Also SOME LED replacement lamps are too focussed and therefore do not give enough light to the sides for example. Purpose-made LED units work much better than plug-and-play replacement lamps.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:45 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
I've run modulators for many years without any problem. They just flat out work for me. Those who don't like them seem to express opinions that either have no basis in fact or sound like excuses not to use them because they're ashamed to do so.

.
And I have run without them as a full time rider for many years, that only proves we think we get the results we want.

I don't know anybody who currently runs them, but do know some folks who have tried them and didn't like the sometimes unpredictable reaction to them. I've also witnessed the reaction to them first hand.

I'm open to good ideas, and at one time considered a modulator, but decided against it in favor of what I consider better options to increase my visibility.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:25 AM   #99
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slartidbartfast, a responder above is the first to address an issue that seems to fail many riders, the total riding environment around us. Most everyone focuses on the other road users (as we should) and on the road issues (as we should) but a huge part of the "visibility" issue of bikes and riding is the environment and all the factors that cause us to "blend in a dissappear" into the scene or background.

In addition to other road users, other vehicles, the road itself, I take into account many other factors:
1. Lighting conditions, if the sun is low and strong, we are either a shadow (sun behind us) or have limited vision (sun in front). Same applies for other vehicles.
2. Sun visors down in traffic is a sure sign we dissappear, be extra careful to watch for errant vehicle actions
3. Shadows, on the road, around us, as we move in and out of them we easily disappear.
4. Dark backgrounds around us, again, we blend in and disappear.
5. ANY form of vertical visual elements around intersections especially, because as we pass through the scene we just blend in as another vertical visual element against the background.
6. When I am driving a car or pickup, I study how easily I loose views due to the windshield posts in the vehicle, and how that relates to other vehicle drivers when I'm on my bike.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:55 AM   #100
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Disagree, if I am making other drivers nervous that is good because they are going to be watching me and not their iPhones.

Heavy freeway traffic simply will not allow you to maintain a three or four second following distance and cars are going to pull into that gap. I use my brakes to give me back my cushion immediately instead of riding along for an extra 600 feet with a one second following distance to the vehicle ahead of me.

I don't allow vehicles to be close enough to me to rear end me in the first place, and it would be stupid, moronic even, for me to not be watching my mirrors when slowing on a freeway, so I'm not sure why you suggest being rear ended is a risk.
The irony of this post is so effing thick I could cut it with a knife. I don't want to hear shit-nuthin from you in the bicycles on the road thread.

Me? Ride assertively but not aggressively. Its YOUR LANE. Take it. I'll second the motion of 'the safest lane isn't always the left-most.' It all depends on what traffic's doing. Quite often, I find myself with lots more room in the rightmost lane(s). Also applies to positioning within the lane as well. You get the whole thing. Use it. Most often I'm in the right tire track or further right, right on the lines of the left lane and the left tire track of 2-lane roads or lanes other than the #1 lane on a freeway.

Watch for faces in mirrors. The brain-dead commuters typically won't look in their mirrors till they're fixin to do something. A face in a mirror sez they're thinking about changing lanes.

Ditto for watching front tires. The front tire's going to twitch before anything else happens. You don't have to stare at the front wheels of the cars next to you, but keep em in your peripheral vision.

If you're moving slightly faster than prevailing traffic YOU control where you pass people. Much safer than allowing the cagers to decide where to pass you. ...and you don't have to worry nearly as much about tailgaters 'cause you're constantly scraping em off on the cars you're passing.

Keep your head on a swivel. Look at everything around you. Don't zone out and stare at the cars immediately in front of you. You just don't know when the brain-dead commuter 2 lanes over is going to make a dive at you to get ahead a few car lengths

I enjoy 'surfing' the wave of air that a semi-truck causes. Makes boring freeway driving a little better.

There's lots more, but those are the big ones for me.

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Old 05-03-2013, 09:01 AM   #101
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When coming on to the highway it is often a lot smarter to use quick acceleration to your advantage, instead of slowing down and hoping the car in front of you will not mess things up.

If you need to slow down, in order to move behind the car that is manouvering onto the highway in front of you, you are putting yourself in a very dangerous position.
You can be hit by cars also entering the highway behind you, who are busy checking their mirrors for a good spot.
Once you manouvre onto the highway at that slow speed, there are the high speed cars that where not expecting you. (and whom you did not see, because you had to keep an eye on that clumsy idiot in front of you)

It is better to speed up, quickly pass him on the right when it is save (while doing this, a wheelie is not strictly nessesary) and move onto the highway in front of him.
The higher your speed, the less change you have of being hit from behind and when entering the highway, that is the biggest danger.

The same thing goes for slow moving trucks that are already on the highway, when you are trying to turn onto it.
Use your ability to speed-up, instead of slowing down and move behind them.

Do make sure you do a shoulder-check for the car that might have been overtaking that truck and moves back to the 1st lane, as soon as he has passed it. (and is not expecting you)
If that car is there, then do not force your way in or scare him, but just stay on the shoulder (emergenty lane/space) until it is save.

And this is also true when getting off the highway. Try to avoid having to slow down on the off-ramp.
Better to speed-up and quickly pass slow cars/trucks that are already on the off-ramp, before you go to the right.
If you happen to mis-calculate, no crazy stunts, but just take the next exit.

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Old 05-03-2013, 09:26 AM   #102
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In the Netherlands all the (motorcycle) driving instructors will teach you to always drive about 5 to 10km/h over the speedlimit. Everywhere!
The people that jurge your driving at the exam, share the beleive that this is the safest way to drive a motorcycle, because it enables you to make the decisions, rather then waiting to see what the cars around you are going to do.

If you stay at the speed limit or below, you will fail your driving test!
In that case, you apparently do not have enough confidence in your own skills and need some more lessons.

You are also suppost to use your ability to speed-up, if that helps you avoid dangerous situations.
This means that if you go way over the speed limit during the driving test, but you where able to avoid a dangerous situation, you will get a compliment for it.
This is especially true on the highway and when getting on/of the highway.

Anoyinglly these are not official rules.
Police officers will usually understand why you are doing it and will allow it. (as long as you are actually doing it for safety reasons)
Automatic speedingcams do not look at motorcyles differently.
So your doing it exactly as you where taught, and still you get speeding tickets.

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Old 05-03-2013, 10:32 AM   #103
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Do not ever stay behind a truck, a van, or any other vehicle that obstructs your vision.
If you do not have a choice, then stay way behind it, so they can better see you in their mirrors and you can see more of what is in front of them.
(like your hand a meter away from your face, covers less of your vision then a hand right in front of your face)
Also helps to move a bit to the left or right of the lane, depending on the situation.

Besides the vision thing, it is almost always better to be to launched over a car and hopefully rol, then it is to smash into a flat surface, like the back of a van/truck/SUV. (and most likely loose consiousness right on impact)

If you are planning to pass a truck, do not drive up to it to close.
For the reasons mentioned above and because when you have some distance, you can build-up some speed right before you actually overtake.
Instead of swinging to the left (half blind) and then speeding-up.

Sorry if I'm stating the obvious.
These are realy the basics, but I see so many people messing this up.

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Old 05-04-2013, 12:09 PM   #104
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Cool2

Then, there is the rain:

http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/ho...ng_in_the_wet/

"Riding in the Wet
Caution is the Hallmark of Rainy Days
By Jerry Smith

If you’re the kind of rider who isn’t going to let a little rain stop you from enjoying your sport, good for you. But if you’re also the kind of rider who thinks you can ride the same way in the wet as you do in the dry, all we ask is that you remember us in your will. Riding in the rain requires a change in technique––and more important, in attitude––to keep you from becoming just another of the many greasy smears on the road this winter.

It’s well known that the first rain of the season lifts up the oil and diesel deposited on the asphalt by car and truck traffic, leaving the pavement slick. But even after the slippery stuff washes away, paint stripes, tar snakes, and manhole covers remain, all with the traction equivalent of a silent-movie banana peel. Urban streets especially turn into low-grip minefields, so slow down in town, use your brakes gently, and don’t stop with your rear tire on a surface that could cause wheelspin when you take off. Get on and off the gas and brakes smoothly if you enjoy riding with both your wheels in line.

As parts of the U.S. highway system slouch toward parity with the Dakar Rally route, more and more road hazards go unrepaired, some of which are tricky to spot in winter. That seemingly broad, shallow puddle up ahead might really be a 6-inch-deep pothole filled to the brim with muddy water, just waiting to swallow up an unwary motorcyclist’s front wheel. Watch the cars up ahead to see what happens when they hit it. A big splash and bouncing taillights probably mean you’ll want to take the long way around.

Camouflaged sinkholes are just one of the reasons to slow down and increase your following distance to the car ahead. Cars might suck as transportation, but even in the rain they can outbrake you right out of your boots, and with modern soundproofing the driver might not even hear the thud of your bike hitting the trunk. Give the car ahead of you even more room than usual, and if you’re the one being tailgated, don’t get territorial and defend your piece of the road. Pull over and wave the space invader by, because the paramedics won’t have time to hear about how you stood your ground while they’re prying you and your bike out of the grille of a pick-up truck.

After you adjust your riding style for slick conditions, next comes the attitude check, and sometimes that’s the hardest part. For some riders who aren’t used to riding in bad weather, or aren’t ready for it when it happens, the harder the rain falls the higher their stress level rises. This stress manifests itself as a death grip on the bars, knees clamped tightly on the gas tank, and abrupt control inputs better suited to a round of Whack-A-Mole. Their lines through corners become choppy, and they wear themselves out trying to hold the bike upright against the awful crash they’re convinced is right around the next bend. Not only do all these reactions make that dreaded crash more likely, the fatigue they generate makes it harder to concentrate on the real dangers they need to watch out for in addition to the imaginary ones.

The cure is simple, but it takes practice and a willingness to explore the outer limits of your comfort zone. Next time it rains, suit up and go for a short ride, focusing your awareness on the road surface, the cars around you, and your own reactions. Do everything––accelerating, braking, cornering, changing lanes––smoothly and gently until it becomes instinctive. Ride as if all car drivers are blind, and you’re invisible, and react accordingly. Give the right of way freely, and don’t force the issue with drivers whose minds are obviously on something other than the road.

Increase the length of your rides as you get more comfortable, and one day you’ll find yourself sloshing down the road with the same confidence you have in the dry, along with a better outlook toward riding in bad weather.

Quick Facts

Track tires designed for maximum grip on dry pavement don’t have many sipes to channel water away from the contact patch, so they’re more prone to hydroplaning on standing water. Road tires have more sipes because they’re more likely to be ridden on wet roads. But even road tires can hydroplane if the water is deep enough, or if the speed of the bike is too high."
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:33 PM   #105
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Good point!

The roads here have not seen any good rain in months.
It has often drizzled, but not nearly hard enough to wash anything away.
Whenever the road is wet you start to see huge amounts of colorfull oil stains everywhere.
Especially at traphic lights and intersections. (and that is just the type of dirt that you can actually see)

It has been piling-up and the first day it is going to rain hard enough to make everything float to the surface, it is going create a film of dirt on top of the road surface, that is going to be very, very slippery.

I'm hoping for 1 or 2 long and really hard showers to wash most of it away, but it seems I'll have to wait a while longer.
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