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Old 03-07-2013, 07:28 PM   #16
Filterman
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Correction on the part# NU 1426.

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Old 03-08-2013, 06:37 AM   #17
xcflyn
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I like it, but I guess I dont get it. I assume (never assume) you put the top back on the stock air box after you install this filter - correct ? If so then are we not back to the pre-filter -(feeding the air box) still being our main restriction, gaining little if nothing over stock ? Not trying to "diss" the product, just wondering about that part and if there are any HP gains,re-mapp,milage information on this.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:27 AM   #18
mousitsas
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I assume (never assume) that it is a more restrictive approach to filtering, especially with the prefilter in place. If on the other hand it filters and flows well enough without the airbox, then it makes a lot of sense.
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:05 AM   #19
pdxmotorhead
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I could see some options of modifying the airbox to compliment the filter,, provide best available air temps and some mud/water protection..

That would buy best airflow with best protection...



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Old 03-08-2013, 11:33 AM   #20
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The main idea is to provide a re-usable foam air filter. It provides a larger surface area over the standard filter for longer service life, better filtration and improved air flow for better fuel economy.
Outright hp gains is not what we were looking for but there should be a small gain due to the improved air flow.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fast4d View Post
I think rottweiler when I see that filter....
IMO the Rottweiler has nothing on the Uni. The Rottweiler is prone to air leakage due to the base design, the installation is a lot more involved, and the foam is thinner meaning less filtration..... to name just a few reasons why the Rottweiler is inferior IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filterman View Post
The main idea is to provide a re-usable foam air filter. It provides a larger surface area over the standard filter for longer service life, better filtration and improved air flow for better fuel economy.
Outright hp gains is not what we were looking for but there should be a small gain due to the improved air flow.
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:02 PM   #22
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The inner foam is 15mm thick, the outer is 9mm. We use the same fine grade of foam on both layers. The reason for this is the foam layers are seperate. When you have two layers of foam bonded together you need to have a coarse outer layer to pick the air flow up after the lamination process. The twin layer foam is heat laminated together. this process reduces the flow rate.

We looked a Rottweiler style air filter. This type of design has its benifits. We make similar products for speedway and race cars and they work very well but we went with this design so you can still use the air box lid and keep the filter water tight plus keep the cost down.

Using the pre-cleaner should not reduce the performance of the bike at all. The volume of air inside the airbox is much more than the engine needs to breath.

FYI the original stacks remain fitted. They sit inside a chamber in the filter and still get all the benifits they were designed to give.

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Old 03-08-2013, 10:39 PM   #23
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Something I haven't understand

Are you supposed to put the airbox cover on or not?
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:38 PM   #24
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Yes it's designed so the air box lid can go back on.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:47 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Filterman View Post
Yes it's designed so the air box lid can go back on.
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Does it have to, though?
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:11 AM   #26
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That is up to the user. It was designed for use with the lid but could be used without. You would need to sort the crank case breathers.
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:15 AM   #27
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Thanks. Do you plan to make one for the 950 too?
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:24 AM   #28
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We will in the next few weeks.
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Old 03-09-2013, 06:58 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sporting Wood View Post
I'm not a fan of the Rottweiler but these things you criticize it for are patently false. I have a home-made version that utilizes the same filter...and IS superior to the Rottweiler imho.

Base design doesn't leak AT ALL as long as its properly installed and the base-plate isn't cracked.

Installation is SIMPLE... and I might add incorporates the option to route crankcase vent inside whereas this Aussie UNI one doesn't... Not that I'D do that! Theres always these guys in California that are worried to death that the DMV will throw them into jail for such an environmental infraction.

Thicker foam doesn't necessary mean better filtration IF in fact, this UNI actually has thicker foam... which I sorta doubt. Foam density is key here, that and dual density that first gets out all the course stuff with a lower density media allowing the finer/denser inner filter to do its job. Use has indicated the Rottweiler, and my unabashed superior copy does that job well.

I also notice that the Rottweiler keeps the velocity stacks. This is a sorta big deal imho from a tuning and hp pov. It also has far greater filter area, which is also a very big deal.

Don't get me wrong, this is an innovative design, and I like it. I'd think though, that I'd rather wait and see how well it works out before I bought one myself. I'm very happy with the ITG for now and couldn't really imagine swapping.
I'm not going to get into an ADV pissin match here.... but these claims are not unfounded.

I have seen reports in this forum of people complaining of seeing dust inside the Rottweiler system, and complaining about how finicky the system is to open and close properly. I agree, it must be 'installed properly'. But that's my point. I don't want to dick with that for $300. The Uni looks stupid-easy to remove and install without having to worry about getting the base board and clips to line up properly.... And if they don't line up and everything doesn't come together perfectly, well, it's dust city inside your throttle bodies.

I've read several Rottweiler installation threads and also read the Rottweiler installation manual. From the Rottweiler site: "It requires removal of the SAS system or zip tying it to the frame with a filter on it, and a proper map file downloaded/created for your specific bike (stock ECU or PC3). That's a pretty involved install for an air filter! I wand to drop an oiled foam air filter in and go, without having to mess with all that crap.

For $300 that's not worth it IMO. For over $200 less (Uni costs $97 USD) I can get a filter that seals well without dinking with a baseboard and clips, filters just as good or better, doesn't require ECU tuning, doesn't require SAS removal, and retains the stock air box in order to keep the filter cleaner and from getting wet. I'll take the Uni. I'm not looking for performance gains and I'm not a tuner.

For those looking to tinker and tune, the Rottweiler is probably best for you. But for those of us who want a drop in an oiled foam filter without having dink with anything, the Uni is it (so far).

Velocity stacks are retained with the Uni.
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Old 03-09-2013, 08:03 AM   #30
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Hey Boulder, it seems to me that you wouldn't even need to take the 'trumpets' off of the throttle bodies, right? You could just slip the filter (oiled, with springs installed) over the trumpets, never having to take the trumpets off of the throttle bodies, then zip-tie to secure and velcro oiled orange filter over top.... Unless I'm missing something here.
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