ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Road warriors
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-11-2013, 06:35 PM   #31
NJ-Brett
Brett
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Southern New Jersey
Oddometer: 6,225
I have had a number of old Triumphs, as well as many other bikes over the years and I was not happy with the new Bonneville.
Power was low for the engine size but more then enough, but the bike was uncomfortable, heavy, and handled much worse then the old bikes.
If you are used to the old bikes, the new ones look a bit goofy and sound like a sewing machine.
Trouble free though...
NJ-Brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 06:55 PM   #32
MotoRacerGabe
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: El Paso, Tx
Oddometer: 15
I went from traded my Vulcan 2000 for the sportster while I still had my Honda Blackbird. I ended up selling the blackbird a few months later because I didn't ride it. I kept letting it sit for so long and the battery died a few times. I don't miss the bigger bikes one bit.

Like one dude said, it's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.

I thought about keeping my Blackbird but, I still have many years left in me and can get another fast bike down the road if I want.
MotoRacerGabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 08:24 PM   #33
mr openroad
Target Fixated
 
mr openroad's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Phoenix
Oddometer: 4,083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8rPaul View Post
Absolutely NO intention to discredit the performance of the Triumph twins here. I'm thinking pretty hard about buying a new Bonneville. My last three bikes were pretty high performance (Duc ST4S, Buell 1125R, KTM 950 Adv) and while having the lowest amount of hp the KTM was my fav. I know that the Triumph can roll along at any sane speed, but have any of you gone this same route?
I went from a ZX12 to a DR650 with no regrets. Bonnevilles are fine machines.
mr openroad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:10 PM   #34
JerryH
Vintage Rider
 
JerryH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Chandler, AZ
Oddometer: 4,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I have had a number of old Triumphs, as well as many other bikes over the years and I was not happy with the new Bonneville.
Power was low for the engine size but more then enough, but the bike was uncomfortable, heavy, and handled much worse then the old bikes.
If you are used to the old bikes, the new ones look a bit goofy and sound like a sewing machine.
Trouble free though...
As the former owner of a '66, I don't think the new ones compare favorably to the originals at all in character. But they don't break down. I'm sure a set of decent pipes would get some sound out of them. But it is hard to believe that engine has a 360 degree crank. Besides the Bonnie, I've also had 2 Yamaha XS650s, and all 3 were shakers. You could watch the forks jump up and down at a stoplight. I thought for sure Triumph had put a counterbalancer in there, but cannot find any reference to one. They definitely need to put some of the vibration back.


Remember when the Japanese first came out with v-twins? The Japanese, being engineers, and realizing that a v-twin close to 45 degrees was not going to be smooth, solved the problem by using offset crankpins. The result was a v-twin that felt and sounded like a 180 degree parallel twin, and it just didn't sell well. It wasn't until the Japanese started to de-engineer their v-twins and give them some character that people started buying them.

The Bonneville is definitely NOT a performance bike, either in power or handling. It's not about trying to see how fast you can take the next corner. It's about just getting on and riding, letting the bike take you where you want to go, while you just sit back and relax. It's not a cruiser as in Harley copy, but it is a cruiser, by today's standards. Back in the '60s it was just called a motorcycle.
__________________
2002 Vulcan 750 (now being slowly reassembled) 2013 Royal Enfield B5
2001 XT225, 2009 Genuine Stella
2012 Zuma 125, 1980 Puch moped
JerryH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 12:30 AM   #35
Scrivens
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Scrivens's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: usually the garage
Oddometer: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ-Brett View Post
I have had a number of old Triumphs, as well as many other bikes over the years and I was not happy with the new Bonneville.
Power was low for the engine size but more then enough, but the bike was uncomfortable, heavy, and handled much worse then the old bikes.
As I've mentioned before on this site, I've had a long association with Brit twins and also own a Kawasaki W800. I've had a look at the Bonnevilles on and off since their first release but I could never bring myself to buy one. I have friends who own them, and while I quite like the engine, the rest of the bike bears little resemblance at all to a 'classic' Brit twin. It is way larger physically than a Brit twin, feels too heavy, the seat is too low, handling is not the sharpest and the engine doesn't have much of what is usually called "character". The W800 on the other hand is smaller, feels about 50lbs lighter (it is actually only 15 pounds lighter), and has a very similar ride and feel to my BSA Thunderbolt - torquey, smooth, but with that 360 degree throb always there.

I find the W800 (or W650) a lot more fun to ride than my friends' Bonnies, but saying that, the new Bonneville is still a very good ride in itself and well worth having one in the garage. It's just not at all like the originals, and a bit of a disappointment to us old guys. Perhaps they should have left the Bonneville name/legend alone and called it the Saint.
Scrivens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 12:58 AM   #36
Tripped1
Likely Lost.
 
Tripped1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sandy Eggo
Oddometer: 7,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrivens View Post
I find the W800 (or W650) a lot more fun to ride than my friends' Bonnies, but saying that, the new Bonneville is still a very good ride in itself and well worth having one in the garage. It's just not at all like the originals, and a bit of a disappointment to us old guys. Perhaps they should have left the Bonneville name/legend alone and called it the Saint.

To be fair I doubt Triumph was that worried about the faithful with the real Bonnies and Tigers.

Look at the product placement after Bloor took over the show

Speed Triple and Daytona 955i in Mission Impossibile2, there was some Mattew Mcconaughey movie that he was riding a Scrambler, the Street Triples in that Angelina Jolie flick.

They aren't aiming at the old gaurd, they needed them to get off the ground, but they are looking more for a younger demographic.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by RottenScummyTroll View Post
Show folks something with a clutch and carburetor, and it's like teaching a baboon to use a Macbook.
Tripped1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 02:03 AM   #37
Scrivens
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Scrivens's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: usually the garage
Oddometer: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripped1 View Post
To be fair I doubt Triumph was that worried about the faithful with the real Bonnies and Tigers.
Quite true - and it's far better that they didn't just re-hash the old bikes using its final development in the 1980's Triumph T series as the basis.

I love old Brit bikes, but I also have many terrible memories of them and the amount of time and money spent in keeping them on the road - even when new - is horrendous. That is true of just about everyone who owned a BSA, Triumph or Norton back in the day. While a lot of new bike riders/buyers are in their 40's and 50's the old Brit bikes were well and truly on the way out in their youth (1970s-80's effectively) and would have had little widespread 'saw one, want one' appeal. The real faithful are too old to be a marketing target and anyone younger, whose entire experience has been with reliable modern Japanese bikes, would not be in the least interested in buying a genuine 100% copy of a late 60's Bonnie given the upkeep involved. There would always be a few of course, but nothing like the huge market Triumph tapped with the 2001 Bonnie. Even the W650/800 series Kawasakis and the Guzzi V7s have not gone much beyond a niche market in comparison. My current Sportster is a much more developed, refined and reliable bike than my old XLCH, and while I appreciate old Harleys there is no way I'd ever buy a 'new' ironhead again.

I think it was a great decision to risk building a standard twin so soon after the success of the triples in the late 90's as it could have gone very wrong indeed and put a lot of financial strain on the company as development and approval is an expensive business. What that has left us with is the ability to readily buy what is one of the few decent basic 'big' bikes available, and with just enough character to give an impression of what riding the old ones was like - without the pain. If I couldn't have bought the W800 here I'd probably have ended up with a T100 or Thruxton eventually.
Scrivens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 02:06 AM   #38
Tripped1
Likely Lost.
 
Tripped1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sandy Eggo
Oddometer: 7,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrivens View Post
Quite true - and it's far better that they didn't just re-hash the old bikes using its final development in the 1980's Triumph T series as the basis.

I love old Brit bikes, but I also have many terrible memories of them and the amount of time and money spent in keeping them on the road - even when new - is horrendous. That is true of just about everyone who owned a BSA, Triumph or Norton back in the day. While a lot of new bike riders/buyers are in their 40's and 50's the old Brit bikes were well and truly on the way out in their youth (1970s-80's effectively) and would have had little widespread 'saw one, want one' appeal. The real faithful are too old to be a marketing target and anyone younger, whose entire experience has been with reliable modern Japanese bikes, would not be in the least interested in buying a genuine 100% copy of a late 60's Bonnie given the upkeep involved. There would always be a few of course, but nothing like the huge market Triumph tapped with the 2001 Bonnie. Even the W650/800 series Kawasakis and the Guzzi V7s have not gone much beyond a niche market in comparison. My current Sportster is a much more developed, refined and reliable bike than my old XLCH, and while I appreciate old Harleys there is no way I'd ever buy a 'new' ironhead again.

I think it was a great decision to risk building a standard twin so soon after the success of the triples in the late 90's as it could have gone very wrong indeed and put a lot of financial strain on the company as development and approval is an expensive business. What that has left us with is the ability to readily buy what is one of the few decent basic 'big' bikes available, and with just enough character to give an impression of what riding the old ones was like - without the pain. If I couldn't have bought the W800 here I'd probably have ended up with a T100 or Thruxton eventually.
I owned a couple old problem children, a 68 bonnie, 74 iron head, and 76 FLT....

The Bonnie I sold the second time I blew the ring off of it stomping on the shifter like it was the rear brake.....for some reason the tranny was a little banged up to when I looked.

The modern classics certainly aren't 70s Trumpets, but they like work, so they have that going for them.

I have a Speed Triple and a Daytona 675, the tripple is the "slow bike"
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by RottenScummyTroll View Post
Show folks something with a clutch and carburetor, and it's like teaching a baboon to use a Macbook.
Tripped1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 05:48 AM   #39
Scrivens
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Scrivens's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: usually the garage
Oddometer: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripped1 View Post
The Bonnie I sold the second time I blew the ring off of it stomping on the shifter like it was the rear brake.....for some reason the tranny was a little banged up to when I looked.
Ah yes, like winding a bike with rearsets out in 2nd, changing to 3rd and forgetting it has a racing pattern box. Valve bounce passing through neutral and detonation in 1st... BTDT.
Scrivens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 06:50 AM   #40
Tripped1
Likely Lost.
 
Tripped1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sandy Eggo
Oddometer: 7,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrivens View Post
Ah yes, like winding a bike with rearsets out in 2nd, changing to 3rd and forgetting it has a racing pattern box. Valve bounce passing through neutral and detonation in 1st... BTDT.
Yup, right now my bike are one standard shift, and the other GP shift....
...luckily newer triples take that abuse well
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by RottenScummyTroll View Post
Show folks something with a clutch and carburetor, and it's like teaching a baboon to use a Macbook.
Tripped1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 06:55 AM   #41
Durangoman
Yeah its me!
 
Durangoman's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Durango
Oddometer: 773
No, today's Bonnie isnt the same as the Bonnie of the 60s. So what? The women we share our lives with today arent the same as they were in the 60s either; bikes, just as people, change. Appreciate the Bonnie for what it is, not slam it for what it isnt.

Ride and enjoy.



Durangoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 07:41 AM   #42
BalancePoint
Mucker
 
BalancePoint's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Florida, flatter than hammered shit.
Oddometer: 217
I have a Honda ST1300 and a Scrambler.

Both are a bit heavy in relation to power, but otherwise polar opposites. Under a hundred miles the Scram is perfect, longer runs I grab the ST keys. The Honda is a hell of a lot faster, and there's no contest with respect to riding comfort and fun, frankly, above 70 mph. Under that number the Scram is a blast, and it's my every day ride.

If I had to go to a single bike, I would stick with the ST1300 simply for its versatility. I hope that doesn't come to pass, because the Scram is the pure soul of riding.

Sorry if this is really no help at all.
__________________
07 Honda ST1300A
07 Triumph Scrambler
Experience is something you don't get until just after you needed it.
BalancePoint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 08:06 AM   #43
No False Enthusiasm
a quiet adventurer
 
No False Enthusiasm's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Small Town, Texas
Oddometer: 4,178
I've never ridden a "fast" bike... my stable includes only the lowly Wee and Bonnie SE...

Both get me where I want to go in a reliable, enjoyable, and economical manner.

I ain't missin' much...

NFE
No False Enthusiasm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 08:44 AM   #44
O'Hooligan
Ken Dodd's dads dogs dead
 
O'Hooligan's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: Sacramento, CA
Oddometer: 595

I've had over 40 bikes in 43 years of riding, from very fast to everything in-between, and this setup just puts a smile on my face everytime I ride. It is far from fast, but smiles per mile is unaccountable
O'Hooligan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 08:47 AM   #45
eatpasta
Lawnmower Target
 
eatpasta's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Santa Barbara, Ca
Oddometer: 9,995
I have 6 bikes and honestly one of my favorite bikes is a 1975 CB400F. If you're on a sportbike you really just feel like you should be going fast all the time.....but if you're on something like a Bonnie you seem to enjoy taking your time a bit more BUT it still reserves the right to haul ass. Some of my best weekend rides have been on the 400F.
I looked for a good Bonneville for MONTHS and finally I ended up with a Speed Triple that I just couldn't pass it up.... but I still dream of having a Bonnie all the time.
__________________
We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.
T. S. Eliot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnszilla
I was SO high, I could have hunted duck with a rake
Quote:
Originally Posted by VxZeroKnots View Post
MX stuff isn't my cup of tea, but falling down the side of a mountain is
eatpasta is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014