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Old 03-10-2013, 07:06 PM   #16
Plaka
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Get it delivered.

A new rider on a new bike (a bike that is new to YOU) is in one of the highest statistical categories for getting crunched (next to being intoxicated).

You want to be absolutely familiar with every control on the machine...not fumbling or having to look. You want to be in excellent practice with your emergency braking---maximum stopping without losing control.

Some parking lot sessions will build and hone the skills you need to survive on the street. Get a 12 pack of soda and set up a cone course for yourself made out of cans. Practice your low speed skills. Practice with all the controls. Do braking practice runs. Evaluate your level of confidence. When you feel really pretty confident on it, then hit the street.

Some red duct tape, or better, the heavy cloth tape stucco people use, on strategic points on the faring will save some scrapes when, not if, you drop it. (often in your driveway or garage.) Take it off later and remove any goo with alcohol.

Playing it conservative will never hurt you. Playing it too bold very well might. Plenty of time for boldness later.

Also, practice sitting on it in the garage and making engine noises when it's too nasty out to ride. Or sit on it an watch race videos. We all do
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:22 PM   #17
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Assuming the roads aren't filfthy, just ride it. You took the course, you are more prepared than a lot of new riders. And you won't learn to ride until you actually ride it in a variety of conditions.

Also not sure why some people insist you absolutely will drop your bike. I started on a ninja 250, it was a great choice over a larger bike, and I never dropped it or crashed or any of those things some people insist will happen. On a larger bike now, still havent dropped it. Im glad I didnt have anyone telling me negative things when I started riding. Be smart and careful, but most of all have fun riding! That's the point!
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:53 PM   #18
Plaka
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Originally Posted by wtjBatman View Post
Assuming the roads aren't filfthy, just ride it. You took the course, you are more prepared than a lot of new riders. And you won't learn to ride until you actually ride it in a variety of conditions.

Also not sure why some people insist you absolutely will drop your bike. I started on a ninja 250, it was a great choice over a larger bike, and I never dropped it or crashed or any of those things some people insist will happen. On a larger bike now, still havent dropped it. Im glad I didnt have anyone telling me negative things when I started riding. Be smart and careful, but most of all have fun riding! That's the point!
You're special. Most people drop them at some point.

"negative things" includes things like getting dead. Far too many riders do. It's not like the worst thing is a broken leg. One of my early riding mentors cautioned me that if I always thought about the dangers, I wouldn't have fun. If I didn't think about them enough, I wouldn't have fun either. It's a balancing act. You can have plenty of fun in a parking lot working on your skills.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:08 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by wtjBatman View Post
Assuming the roads aren't filfthy, just ride it. You took the course, you are more prepared than a lot of new riders. And you won't learn to ride until you actually ride it in a variety of conditions.

Also not sure why some people insist you absolutely will drop your bike. I started on a ninja 250, it was a great choice over a larger bike, and I never dropped it or crashed or any of those things some people insist will happen. On a larger bike now, still havent dropped it. Im glad I didnt have anyone telling me negative things when I started riding. Be smart and careful, but most of all have fun riding! That's the point!
You're special. Most people drop them at some point.

"negative things" includes things like getting dead. Far too many riders do. It's not like the worst thing is a broken leg. One of my early riding mentors cautioned me that if I always thought about the dangers, I wouldn't have fun. If I didn't think about them enough, I wouldn't have fun either. It's a balancing act. You can have plenty of fun in a parking lot working on your skills. part of being smart is managing that balancing act.


After 34+ years of riding, I still do parking lot time with a new bike. In the spring after a winter of not riding, I do backroads time and practice emergency stops. Then I don't think about it a lot. My reflexes are tuned up, time to just enjoy the ride.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:12 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plaka View Post
You're special. Most people drop them at some point.
Actually "most" don't.

The "It's not if but when..." is an often parroted MYTH.
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DAKEZ screwed with this post 03-10-2013 at 10:20 PM
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:19 PM   #21
Plaka
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Actually "most" don't.
Do a poll on it? Like, how long did it take you after you started riding before you dropped your bike for the first time. look for answers like "I've been riding for X years and haven't dropped one yet".

Everyone I know that rides, without exception, has. I know enough people to make a good statistical sample.

This is actually the first time I have encountered anyone that says they haven't and not to be insulting, but I don't believe them.

One of the immutable laws of things that can fall over is that at some point they will. One of the immutable laws of people is that they are not perfect.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:28 PM   #22
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For those who learn to ride on the street (not dirt) every poll and study I have seen and read over the years has over 60% never crashing or dropping their bikes. (even polls done right here on advrider)

I started very Young and could not count the times I have been down OFF-road.

On road it is four times due to road contaminates / Zero collisions...

Unless you count that one time when I was 19 years old, drunk as hell and t-boned a cop car.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:34 PM   #23
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I would not recommend it since you haven't even been on a motorcycle since August.

If you do decide to do it, make sure you go with someone and practice, practice, practice before driving off the lot.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:38 PM   #24
Plaka
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
For those who learn to ride on the street (not dirt) every poll and study I have seen and read over the years has over 60% never crashing or dropping their bikes. (even polls done right here on advrider)

/snip
Cite one (or more)?
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:44 PM   #25
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I rode my first (current) bike home the day I bought it. Hadn't been on two wheels in three months at the time. 30 miles of interstate, plus evening traffic.*

As far as I know, I didn't die on the trip.












*30 miles of interstate was between po-dunk Southern Orygun towns. Evening traffic in Grants Pass can be interesting though.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:53 PM   #26
Plaka
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I would not recommend it since you haven't even been on a motorcycle since August.

If you do decide to do it, make sure you go with someone and practice, practice, practice before driving off the lot.
And that was a different bike, briefly ridden on a closed course with nothing to think about but riding that bike. Get out on the street and mix it up with drunks, idiots, the brain dead, weird surfaces...
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:54 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by ShardPhoenix View Post
I rode my first (current) bike home the day I bought it. Hadn't been on two wheels in three months at the time. 30 miles of interstate, plus evening traffic.*

As far as I know, I didn't die on the trip.

*30 miles of interstate was between po-dunk Southern Orygun towns. Evening traffic in Grants Pass can be interesting though.
Do you think that was advisable?
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:49 PM   #28
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Do you think that was advisable?
That depends on which standpoint (generic) you look at it from.

A care bear safety zealot would probably say that I was downright bonkers to do it considering the time of day, speeds of 70mph, my lack of experience and not much familiarity with the bike, etc. etc.

On the other side of the fence there's the standpoint that I did an assessment of the risks, accepted them, and had a hard time wiping the grin from my face when I got home.
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:53 PM   #29
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Terrible thought... buying a bike and actually having to... oh my god... ride it! How could one!
Maybe carry it home, since it's a quite small one?
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Old 03-11-2013, 01:06 AM   #30
Plaka
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Originally Posted by ShardPhoenix View Post
That depends on which standpoint (generic) you look at it from.

A care bear safety zealot would probably say that I was downright bonkers to do it considering the time of day, speeds of 70mph, my lack of experience and not much familiarity with the bike, etc. etc.

On the other side of the fence there's the standpoint that I did an assessment of the risks, accepted them, and had a hard time wiping the grin from my face when I got home.
You got to grin 'cause you got home.

i asked if you thought it advisable.
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