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Old 03-18-2013, 03:07 AM   #16
Bevelheadmhr OP
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Rearsets

About ten years ago I was given a box of spares from someone who'd built an Yam XJR turbo streetfighter. I put them away and forgot them, until recently. Most of the parts were junk, except for a mismatched set of rearset components by the german company LSL. I was surprised to find I could make up a complete setup, although I'd have a make a few spacers here and there. The rearests were only a couple of mm out compared to the frame mounts, so with a bit of drilling, I could use them on the Norley.



I decided to remove the mismatched anodising from the levers and polish them instead. I'd read somewhere that the anodising could be removed easily using caustic soda, so I tried a little chemistry experiment..




After half an hour, the anodising was gone, just needed to polish the levers now...


To make a new gearshift linkage, I reused the original splined lever, but turned it upside down and cut the end off..


I bent and threaded a stainless bar and used a clevis joint at one end and a rose joint at the other. I drilled the splined lever and bolted a simple alloy triangle to it, which in turn was drilled to take the clevis joint. IT seems to work ok, and if not I can always changed the shape of the 'triangle' to give a different lever ratio. The rear sets are really far back, which means the link rod is long, not ideal, but this is the MK1 version, I may make a better looking MK2 version whn I know it works ok.


On the brake side, I used a secondhand Brembo master cylinder from a Ducati, made a new mount and machined a new pushrod from a stainless bolt. I need to see how it all works in practice, but I'm quite pleased with how it looks, and they cost me nothing, which is a big plus..




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Old 03-18-2013, 03:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad M View Post
A jig saw works well for cutting aluminum! That would be absolutely murder with all the drilling and filing. Interesting project that I'd consider too.
I didnt have a jig saw, but I did have a piller drill, so thats what I used, it wasnt too bad, it didnt take that long really.
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:32 AM   #18
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Hubs

Coming up to date, I recently bought a pair of new Harley Hubs, twin disc for the front. The rear was from a later model with one inch spindle, but a new set of 3/4 inch bearings sorted that out. The front hub needed more work.



I couldnt find a source of a suitable wheel bearings that would fit the hub and the 20mm Honda spindle. It took five hours of machining to make an old 3/4 HD spindle fit the Honda forks. Another potential problem is having enough clearance between the calipers and the front wheel (when its built), as it looks as if the spokes may hit the inside of the calipers. I'm going to build the wheels up using Morad 18 inch alloy rims and stainless spokes, I intend to lace them myself, which I havent done before, so should be interesting!

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Old 03-18-2013, 04:40 AM   #19
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Progress to date

This is as far as I've got at the moment.. Hopefully I can order the alloy rims and spokes soon, and once the wheels are on, I can work out where to mount the oil tank, find some discs, a rear caliper and make a mount for it. I may change from the Honda Nissin calipers which came with the forks, to a set of gold Brembos, no real reason other than I think they look better. I havent decided yet whether to paint the tank or leave it polished, or whether to powdercoat the frame gloss black or clear coat it to show off all that lovely brazing. Ditto for the exhaust, current favourite is to go for a XR750 style high level twin megaphone in stainless or even Ti if I can afford it...decisions, decisions..


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Old 03-18-2013, 07:48 AM   #20
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Now I know what to do with that XLH motor I've got kicking around the garage.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:40 PM   #21
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Even though it would look great painted up, it would be a crime to cover up that beautiful metalwork on the tank and the frame!
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Old 03-23-2013, 11:02 AM   #22
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NO PAINT



You can't tell, but I'm typing with one hand reading this thread!
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Old 03-23-2013, 03:47 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2WheelTrampin View Post
NO PAINT



You can't tell, but I'm typing with one hand reading this thread!
I was originally going to paint it black (frame and tank), with gold pinstripes, as I've always liked that combo on the likes of a Norton Commando. I'm edging toward leaving the tank polished and having the frame clear powdercoated. Seems thats what most folks recommend, and I do like the gold brazing onthe frame, be a pity to hide it under paint.
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Old 04-17-2013, 12:02 PM   #24
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It took awhile, but I finally bought the Morad alloy rims I need. Both 18 inch a 3.0 on the back and a 2.15 for the front. I got them from Central Wheels in Birmingham (UK), despite having the correct dimensions of the hubs (Width, PCD) they were relunctant to sell the correct length spokes. Maybe I just got them on a bad day. I'll walk around the corner tomorrow and see old chap who restores old bikes, and rebuilds wheels for pocket money. Bill is in his late 80s, last time I saw him he was completing this 'works' 1926 Sunbeam, which had been found buried in a scrap yard. He has a few old bikes, including a Vincent he's owned since the late 50s, though Bill has reently had to give up riding due to poor health.



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Old 04-18-2013, 06:51 AM   #25
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I LOVE where this is going! great work! You've got me subscribed
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:40 PM   #26
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I called Central Wheels again last week, with the thought that if they wouldnt sell me the spokes I needed (which I didnt know the lengths required), then I'd give them hassle at their stand at the Stafford Classic bike show this weekend. As it turned out, I got put through to someone else, who was very helpful, and my spokes should be on their way now. I'm making a wheel stand, to have a go at lacing the wheels myself. I met a chap at Stafford who lives near me, who says he has a mate who makes his own spokes and will lace up wheels cheaply, useful to know.

I had intended to use the floating discs that came with the Honda front end, but they are dished and I'd need adapters/spacers to bolt them to the Harley front hub. Not really a problem accept there looked to be a lack of clearance, and also it would mean having a mismatched rear disc which would have annoyed me forever. So I bought a set of EBC discs instead, they'll still need spacers, though even then the calipers may not clear the spokes. I'll need to lace the wheels to be sure one way of the other..



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Old 05-01-2013, 08:25 AM   #27
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These are my favorite threads. Lots of details. Lots of photos. Lots of innovation. Well done.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:31 AM   #28
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I've always wanted to do this...hurry up and finish!
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:32 PM   #29
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Ok, well today was a big day, my stainless spokes finally arrived, though to be fair, I think they were made for me. Later in the day I also got a big parcel from Unity Equipe, which I've not even had time to open yet.. it should contain a few goodies.. seat, stainless sidestand and tank strap and catch.

This morning I cycled over the other side of town to see Jeff and drink tea, we'd agreed he'd make me a wheel stand so I can true the wheels up. As often happens I had a sketch of the simplest stand I'd seen, but before long th edesign evolved a bit and now its going to be much more useful, as I'll be able to use it on any size wheels, with or without a spindle. Hopefully it'll e ready in a few days.

This evening, I had a go at lacing a wheel for the first time. I made a few silly mistakes along the way, but the rear wheel wasnt as difficult as I'd thought. Though of course I still need to true it. Full of confidence, I started on the front wheel, expecting to be finished in no time. After three attempts I gave up for the evening, I'll try again tomorrow. The main problem is that all the holes in the hub for the spokes are all bevelled on one side only, so all the spokes have to be seated on the same side. When the spokes cross it means that one of the spokes doesnt sit in its seat correctly. Obviously I'm lacing it in the srong way, but I cant see the right way at the moment.

Rear wheel..







Front wheel.. started ok, then it all went wrong..



One side done.. almost done !.. not quite



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Old 05-02-2013, 02:12 AM   #30
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I did a quick test fit of the seat, the two stubs which mount it to the frame didnt quite match up, but I threatened them with a big hammer and eventually the seat went on. It seems a bit too far back, but not sure yet..

Mounts didnt align at first..


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