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Old 03-18-2013, 02:35 PM   #1
stoke OP
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Observations of someone who surfs and rides...what are yours?

Riding a surfboard and a motorcycle are very similar in the way that they both demand total concentration and as such, are a meditative, mind clearing tonic. The feeling after doing both is about the same. Relaxed, calm, clear head.

That is the main similarity.

The second is that piloting a motorcycle also makes you a better surfer.

I have seen dramatic improvements in my surfing since I started riding again. Why? Well, you have to look where you want to go on a bike, and if you don't the consequences can be severe. So you learn to do it.

On a surfboard, looking where you want to go is everything, if you don't you fall. Thing is, it can take a while to really drive this point home on a board because falling isn't that big of a deal surfing. I've been making late drops and connecting up the waves better than ever, and maintaining speed all the way down the line. All due to looking where I want to go during decreasing radius turns and picking a line in the dirt.

The biggest difference between the two is that surfers, for the most part, all hate each other. No one talks to each other in the lineup and it's very competitive all the time. Yelling abuse at each other is common and a part of surfing.

Motorcyclists have this "we're all in it together" attitude, so you talk to each other at stoplights, wave on the road, group rides, etc. I love that.

If you surf and ride, what are some of your observations?
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:56 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoke View Post
If you surf and ride, what are some of your observations?

When I'm riding, I keep an eye out for the man in the blue suit.


When I am surfing, I keep an eye out for the man in the grey suit.




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Old 03-18-2013, 06:50 PM   #3
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Good one...I wonder how many others will get the reference!?
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:28 PM   #4
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If you surf and ride, what are some of your observations?
The thing I most often notice is - you can be a fat biker, but you can't be a fat surfer
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:35 PM   #5
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The thing I most often notice is - you can be a fat biker, but you can't be a fat surfer
Jimbo Pellegrine does not agree with you :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrf93aLQXBE
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:47 PM   #6
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I had no idea surfers are so negatively competitive in the way you describe it. I'm a little surprised by that. Yeah, riders can be competitive, but the ones I know that are competitive are lovely people. Very supportive of people that ride slower. They just don't like riding that way. But then again, they're very, very good.
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:03 PM   #7
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I surf The Web. Does that count?
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:29 PM   #8
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Both have that living in the moment feeling that I find extremely addictive. For the longest time I didn't realize it's my need for zen that drove me to spend so much time surfing and riding. I've also been able to achieve zen while fishing, machining parts, flying stunt kites, riding bicycles etc. My hobbies and the enjoyable parts of my work all centered around that zen feeling even though I didn't realize it until recently. I'm at my best when I'm not aware of anything else.



Quote:
Originally Posted by LowInSlo View Post
I had no idea surfers are so negatively competitive in the way you describe it. I'm a little surprised by that.
It all depends on how crowded it is where you're surfing. I mostly surfed solo or with small groups of friends in FL and usually had a lot of ocean to myself. The jerks generally only paddled out when there was a large swell coming in. I'm a thousand miles away from my old beach now but I have a ton of fond memories of good people on the lineup.
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:20 AM   #9
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Regarding the "prickly" nature of most surfers...obviously that is not the case with just you and your surf buddies, but for the most part if you surf in a crowded area, the vibe can get pretty heavy. Competitive in not a nice way. It's just a part of the culture. Good waves are considered a limited resource.

Motorcycling on the other hand, has this incredibly diverse population of friendly riders that are always willing to help out a fellow rider. I went on a semi-organized dual sport ride here, never met any of the people before, and all were super helpful and friendly even the really fast guys like someone mentioned above. That would never happen in the surfing world.

As far as fat surfers: the extra weight certainly doesn't help, but there is a 300lb guy, biggest belly you've ever seen, that CHARGES big Black's in the winter. Unreal. Guy rips.

Back to the positive stuff though...the "mindless" aspect between the two.

The thing I like about bikes is that I can fit in the fun mind-clearing sessions in while doing what I have to do already, like commuting to work.

One of the guys I surf with is doing his MSF course right now because he's heard of me talk about how when the surf is flat, I can just go for a ride and the feeling is the same. When I pointed out that he could also just ride to work/errands/gym/whatever, he was sold.
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:44 AM   #10
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When Im surfing, I like to feel the ocean, see the swell start to form and start placing myself in the optimal position. Once I drop in its all natural and Im not thinking about form or looking down the line it all just happens. When Im riding, Im looking up the road and setting up the next series of turns. It doesnt come as natural as surfing, but there are similarities. Another similarity is the importance of smell; not that you need it to ride well, but the enjoyment of smelling the sea when you surf or the trees and the flowers when you ride.
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:55 AM   #11
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Surfing, WW kayaking, riding all work towards develop the intuitive sense needed to survive random, unpredictable events. Sight, smell and feel are all critical to "reading" the road, wave, trail and not only coming out alive, but maybe even with some style point.

How many times have you just felt something wasn't right, started to plan or react, and avoided a holy crap moment?

I don't think it's just time behind the bars or on the wave, it's a thought process of constantly not taking "it" for granted and always expecting that same turn you take low and hard, to be different every time.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:14 AM   #12
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If you really want to be a more fluid rider and use your bike and body to express your riding style, take up trials for a while, you will be amazed.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:37 PM   #13
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I totally get it about the smell; when you're surfing on big day the vapor in the air from pulverized ocean water just has this tang to it.

Same with motorcycling, when you get out of the cage your forgotten sense of smell wakes and gives you a new overlay of sensation on what was a familiar landscape.

And there is a LOT less room to think going down the line while surfing compared to negotiating turns on a bike. You just go like el queso mentioned.

boinoodle brings up a good point: even if you've been on the same turn hundreds of times, every instance is different-just like every wave is different, every time and you need to flow, react, even predict. I think that really nails it, the intuitiveness required in surfing and riding are the same. Huh. Never really thought about it like that before.

Double H-funny that you mentioned taking up trials today. I was just starting to research where I might be able to at least get some basic training or an intro course.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:43 PM   #14
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the best $50 you will ever spend https://secure.rypusa.com/prodpage.cfm?cat_selected=84&product_selected=84&startrow=1
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:36 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Double H-funny that you mentioned taking up trials today. I was just starting to research where I might be able to at least get some basic training or an intro course.
I haven't tried trials yet, but I'd like to.

http://www.socaltrials.com/

http://www.motoventures.com/

The best money I've ever spent on riding. Did the Victorville school a few years ago and learned an amazing amount:

http://www.shanewatts.com/
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