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Old 03-18-2013, 04:38 PM   #1
cjack OP
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Japanese Screwdrivers for Japanese Screws

Anybody been reading the JIS screwdriver comments in MCN? I discovered these screwdrivers a few months ago when working on a toy train, the Phillips screwdrivers just did not stay in the screw. They tend to cam out (which is actually what they are meant to do to avoid over torqueing...another feature by the people who think we need to be protected from ourselves).
See this site for an explanation...
http://www.rjrcooltools.com/jis.cfm
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:31 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjack View Post
Anybody been reading the JIS screwdriver comments in MCN? I discovered these screwdrivers a few months ago when working on a toy train, the Phillips screwdrivers just did not stay in the screw. They tend to cam out (which is actually what they are meant to do to avoid over torqueing...another feature by the people who think we need to be protected from ourselves).
See this site for an explanation...
http://www.rjrcooltools.com/jis.cfm
Phillips weren't meant to protect us from ourselves. They were designed to be used in pneumatic tools on assembly lines prior to tools having torque limiting feature; cheaper to mess up a screw head than scrap an entire assembly because the threads got stripped. JIS came about after tools were able to have their torque limited. JIS screws do need JIS screwdrivers, but if you're in a bind and need to get a job done now, Phillips drivers can be modified by grinding the tip down to get a better ( but not perfect) fit.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:07 PM   #3
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Yeah, the only tool I've kept from my stock kit is the screwdriver!
Took a stripped brake reservoir screw to learn about JIS

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Old 03-20-2013, 12:17 PM   #4
gravityisnotmyfriend
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If you've ever tried to take a cover off of a vintage Honda, you either used the proper JIS screwdriver or a drill! Those screw are made with an alloy with the strength and hardness of warm butter. They'll strip out if you even think about grabbing a phillips bit.



I think this one fought me the hardest, but I won dammit!
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:28 PM   #5
damurph
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In Canada we have a Robertson head screw. Square hole and the screwdriver bit grabs it extremely well. Google it. makes a Philips obsolete north of the border.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:53 PM   #6
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And as a Canadian, I cringe every time I see a Robertson screw on any vehicle! Their presence usually indicates that maintenance and repairs were carried out by an amateur carpenter who thought they were a mechanic. Undoing the damage caused by a coarse thread wood screw can be an exercise in frustration...

I've found that stubborn JIS screws can be removed using a modified Phillips bit and an impact driver - NOT a pneumatic impact gun! Works most every time, but is no substitute for having the correct screwdrivers or bits...
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:07 PM   #7
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Article and link to purchase here

http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcyc...-screwdrivers/
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Old 03-20-2013, 03:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k-moe View Post
Phillips weren't meant to protect us from ourselves. They were designed to be used in pneumatic tools on assembly lines prior to tools having torque limiting feature; cheaper to mess up a screw head than scrap an entire assembly because the threads got stripped. JIS came about after tools were able to have their torque limited. JIS screws do need JIS screwdrivers, but if you're in a bind and need to get a job done now, Phillips drivers can be modified by grinding the tip down to get a better ( but not perfect) fit.
Actually, the Phillips thing was even earlier. They were adopted in the auto industry originally to be used on trim pieces, and the screws were driven with Yankee screwdrivers, which were a spiral mechanism activated by pushing.

http://www.garrettwade.com/product.a...FQSg4Aod6VcAYA
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:21 PM   #9
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One Good Turn is a history of screws and their drivers, it's a really interesting read if you're into this kind of thing.
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:31 PM   #10
cjbiker
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Drywall driver bits work perfectly with JIS screws. I buy them at my local ACE hardware. Never had one strip. I actually shattered a bit the other day trying to get a really stuck screw out. The bit didn't slip, but shattered instead. Unreal.

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Old 03-22-2013, 06:07 AM   #11
chollo9
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Originally Posted by cjbiker View Post
Drywall driver bits work perfectly with JIS screws. I buy them at my local ACE hardware. Never had one strip. I actually shattered a bit the other day trying to get a really stuck screw out. The bit didn't slip, but shattered instead. Unreal.
Yeah, unfortunately hardened steel often equals brittle steel.
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Old 03-22-2013, 02:54 PM   #12
ErikDK
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Originally Posted by motojournalism View Post
yeah, the only tool i've kept from my stock kit is the screwdriver!
Took a stripped brake reservoir screw to learn about jis
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Old 03-22-2013, 03:18 PM   #13
Jamie Z
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chollo9 View Post
One Good Turn is a history of screws and their drivers, it's a really interesting read if you're into this kind of thing.
Cool, thanks. Just found a used copy on eBay, $4 shipped.

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Old 03-22-2013, 05:48 PM   #14
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I work for a Japanese machine tool manufacturer.
Vessel are the best JIS screwdrivers I've found.

http://www.vesseltools.com/hand-tool...-products.html

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Old 03-23-2013, 06:38 AM   #15
showkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gravityisnotmyfriend View Post
If you've ever tried to take a cover off of a vintage Honda, you either used the proper JIS screwdriver or a drill! Those screw are made with an alloy with the strength and hardness of warm butter. They'll strip out if you even think about grabbing a phillips bit.



I think this one fought me the hardest, but I won dammit!
The alloy of the screw is not likely the problem............you are fighting natures lock-tite.............steel screw in an aluminum case.........electrolysis between two dissimilar metals create a very strong bond that must be cracked.

The proper bit and a hammer strike down the screw shaft can work wonders.
Hand driven or air driver impact with the proper bit also resolves the problem.
Tee handle drivers also work well.

Back in the day......we use to sell Allen head conversion screw packages for engine case screws and the bikes were new and the screws were still "sticky".
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