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Old 05-30-2013, 08:45 AM   #46
Thinc2 OP
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This seems like good advice. I use LIPO batteries for flying a quadcopter (also 2200 mah in this case) and can tell you that they are very dangerous and can cause very serious fires if not constructed or handled correctly.

Obviously the batteries I am using are much larger, and therefore more dangerous, but the principles are likely the same.
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Old 05-31-2013, 07:39 PM   #47
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Drift

I can't speak for any other model but the Stealth HD. But I bought the Stealth shortly after it's release so I guess that was about 3 years ago.

It's held up great in the wet, dust, heat, cold.. the only issue I've had is with the remote. I replaced the battery so the next step will be to replace the remote but it's only $20. The remote has been intermittent at times which has sucked because I thought I was snapping photos while going down the road only to find out I wasn't.
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Old 06-02-2013, 10:40 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Rider View Post
when seeing online comparisons it's always hard to judge not knowing what the settings, conditions and how much post processing was done. It would be easy for a pro to make one camera look or sound better compared to another if they wanted.

The audio is definitely better with the external mic being used, with the mic taped to the back of the helmet. I have mine set at the low "one bar" input level setting on the camera and rarely use the external mic out of laziness.
You can tape some foam over the onboard mic to help with wind noise, but in the end it's a little crappy mic on most of these cameras and going down the road at speeds there will be wind noise, at least from my experience.

I've had a few various helmet cams over the years, none of them have a large enough sensor to really have great low light shooting, all of them seems quite noisy when the sensitivity gets bumped up. For the most part most look great in good lighting conditions, and look not so good in low light. There's post processing that can be done to help with the noise, but you can only polish a turd so much... for me making MC videos is something I really don't want to spend much effort doing, I do that enough while doing video work on shows. I spend far more efforts in my photography usually when riding, but it's fun to have some short videos to look back on after a trip or share online. Easy to make in iMovie with little efforts and time once you get the hang of it. I use it more than Final Cut Pro just for simplicities sake for bike vids.


Here's a somewhat boring clip shot with a HD 170 in challenging lighting conditions and some night riding, no post processing, no external mic, just crappy edits. For my purposes the image/sound quality is good enough to share online. I find the mic on the ghost to be just about the same, I keep it on low input setting for shooting while riding.
In the end the content of what you're shooting and the editing will make a video "better" to document and share your ADVentures than having perfect image or sound quality IMHO.


Death Valley 12/12 from Lost Rider on Vimeo.



This video also a HD 170 I was using an external mic.

BMW F800 R in the Malibu Canyons from Lost Rider on Vimeo.
Hi Lost Rider, great vids and tips on the use of the Drift. I'm using a Contour now but will prob switch to the Drift.

My challenge is in post-production/editing as I am an absolute novice at this and have been trying on the PC and Windows Moviemaker. Is it really that much easier/friendlier doing this on the Mac's iMovie?

Also, am curious if you had 3 cameras set up on your "BMW F800 R in the Malibu Canyons" ride cos I am seeing 3 different angles (helmet, rear wheel and total rear views)? All that switching done by the remote on the fly?

Cheers!
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:23 PM   #49
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Interesting info on the Drift - I am finally getting around to trying to use it:

When I tried to take a pic while recording, it did not work, even though i had everything set up per the manual - ie. video tagging was off.

I contacted Drift Customer Service - which again was awesome. Very simply, you have to record int he following formats in order to be able to capture pictures at the same time - from Drift:

"These are: 1080p (30/25FPS), 960p (30/25FPS), 720p (30/25FPS) or WVGA (30/25FPS). You can check page 7 of the user manual for a few more details here: http://driftinnovation.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Manual-4th-Jan1.pdf"

Note that this online manual has info that is not included in the manual that ships with the device.

Everything works fine now - am happy again

Still trying to figure out Imovie though... That's what is eating up the little time I have.
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Old 06-08-2013, 07:15 AM   #50
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Finally managed to get a video tested and uploaded. What I am realizing is that all the comparison tests between these cameras are sort of meaningless - the quality on y Mac is awesome, but once uploaded to YouTube the quality loss is so large I don't think it really matters what camera you use.

Anyway, I'm relatively pleased with the results and really like the remote and the ability to snap pics at the same time as recording. My battery life is lower than I expected though.



Here are some still taken while recording:




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Old 06-08-2013, 07:35 AM   #51
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What kind of battery life are you guys getting?
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Old 06-24-2013, 05:30 AM   #52
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I got a Ghost HD after borrowing a Hero 3 black for a week, and hating it. The lack of LCD screen and rotatable lens meant it was trial and error, reviewing footage on a latptop to get the thing actually filming what I wanted for each new mounting position, and by the time I got it right, the bloody battery went flat. If you're a pixel-peeper, the GoPro has the better image detail (although IMO it doesn't reproduce color as well, everything seems kind-of 'tinted'). But when it comes to actually watching whats going on, there's really no practical difference. Most folk I know record in 720p/30fps anyway to save card space. WTF the point is in 4K recording I have no idea.

The Ghost is great. Comes with everything you need as standard (unlike the GoPro). I got mine for $400 flat with a 32GB card (less than the GoPro). The flashy remote is great, lets you know what the cam is actually doing (unlike the gopro). Water/dust/ice/mud proof without a case (unlike the gopro). Battery life is a consistent 3 hours (double the gopro). The tagging feature saves trawling through hours of footage, but never risks missing something unexpected because you weren't recording to save space (unlike the GoPro). However, low light footage is pretty poor. Anything at night is very noisy. GoPro definitely wins there. But in terms of usability, the Ghost wins. Out of the box, no screwing about with waterproof cases, laptops, extra LCD screens, steroe external mic adaptors, constant battery swaps. All you need is a USB cable and a cig socket charger, and you're good for as long as you're on the road.

In a nutshell, if you're after production grade footage at the expense of everything else, and you've got the laptop and a box of batteries in the support truck, the GoPro is the go. If you're after an easy to use cam for a few days on (or off) the road - the Ghost is fantastic. Usability is its selling point. You don't even have to think about it to get the footage you want.


On the microphone/wind noise: Both the GoPro and the Ghost have sucky built in mics. ALL built in mics on most things are awful, especially when they need to be weather resistant. At least the Ghost has a standard stereo input plug - unlike the GoPro, where you need a USB-stereo accessory....which costs extra.

I got an old combined earbud/mic headset for Skyping, worth about $10 from DickSmith, and butchered it so I had just the mic. After some experimenting, I found the best setup was to run it in the mouthpiece of the helmet. A bit of artfully placed electrical tape to bulk up the stereo plug, it's snug around the rear port in the Ghost body, leaving it rain-proof. Gives stereo sound, clear voice and cuts the wind noise down to a low background roar at 110kph, keeps the exhaust note and other outside noises (people nearby) audible. Downside is that your footage seems way less hardcore when it includes a soundtrack of you singing along to Florence and the Machine. Which is why there's no Youtube demo clip

But here's some pics of the setup. I've also modified the standard clip with a dremel tool and a spring, to give the cam a notched rotation, so I can change viewing angle mid ride without taking my eyes off the road. Took about 15 mins, can post pics if folks want to duplicate it.







The white cable/dongle is the mic for the Ghost, the foam bud ifs for my UHF/starcom thingummy.




Extra cable gives a bit of on-the-fly-rotateability.

Jdeks screwed with this post 06-24-2013 at 05:36 AM
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Old 06-24-2013, 02:26 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdeks View Post

But here's some pics of the setup. I've also modified the standard clip with a dremel tool and a spring, to give the cam a notched rotation, so I can change viewing angle mid ride without taking my eyes off the road. Took about 15 mins, can post pics if folks want to duplicate it.

Extra cable gives a bit of on-the-fly-rotateability.
yes would you mind taking a couple pic for that....

To be fair, you can spend another $$$ to get the LCD screen remote on GoPro, but gee, $$$ is starting to add - you have to do a lot video blogging to justify the cost-
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:21 AM   #54
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Okay,sorry this took so long. Here's how I made my Ghost's mount a rotating ratchet.

You'll need a dremel, a drill, a little washer about 5-7mm in diameter, and a spring about the size of a 10c piece. It needs to be able to compress into a flat profile when squashed (ie cone shaped when extended) and be fairly stiff


First step is to dismantle the standard base plate (in the back of the below picture):




Get some pliers, grab hold of the silver bolt by the metal thread visible in the pic, then unscrew the little screw in the rotating cap on the other side.

Now, step one is to take the silver bolt, and screw it back into the Ghost body with a socket. Make it firm, use loctite if you have it. We do NOT want this rotating once finished.



Now get out your drill and dremel. Make the two plastic bits look like this:



Basically, grind/sand down the underside of the circular black cap by about a mm or so, making sure its flat and smoot (ish). Then put the little screw back in the circular cap, and put the washer on the screw.

Now drill a hole through the lock plate. This hole should be big enough to allow your little washer to fit through. Grind away the remaining material once the hole is drilled, so you have a 'flat' surface for the back of the cap to fit in.





Now take the spring and assemble as shown below:



Loctite the little screw, squish it all together and put it on the top of the bolt you secured in the ghost's body. Screw the little screw back into the top of the bolt, clamping the whole mechanism together. Tighten until firm - this means the little washer is now flush with the top of the main silver bolt.



If all has gone well, the lock plate should have enough space to move up and down between the 'teeth' in the base of the ghost, and the black plastic cap. But the spring will keep it forced up into the teeth, providing a 'notched' resistance.
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Old 07-04-2013, 10:08 AM   #55
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thanks for the info... somthing to consider for sure
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Old 09-01-2013, 07:52 AM   #56
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I just purchased the Ghost after my VIO POV HD died.

Video quality was the last factor I considered.

I'm spoiled with the loop and tag feature of the VIO. I always have mine on external powered via the bike. and it's always on loop feature. I just tag a good section of the ride after the fact. Drifts implementation of this feature is not as nice as the VIO. POV, but it's still the best of the bunch.

The use of loop and tag function almost makes a remote mandatory. So that's another reason I chose it. Especially with the status light to provide good feedback.

Lastly, Drift is the only one that provides you a decent solution for powering up the unit externally while maintaining relative dust proofness. Get something like this, you don't have to be tethered to the bike but can leave the camera on loop for 20+ hours.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Then there's the rotating lens, if you want to mount the camera between helmet and on bike with a RAM mount. The rotating lens is a godsend.

To me these practical advantages are often overlooked. What's the use of good video quality, if you have to constantly check your battery level, or to remember if it's recording or now?
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Old 09-02-2013, 12:50 AM   #57
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I continue to be happy with the camera as well. I am using it in part for taking video from my home built quad copter for those times when i am willing to trade heavier weight for better video (I have amuch smaller 808 key chain camera as well).

Here is a sample - shame that Youtube reduces the quality so much.

One other thing to note is that i have learned that the GoPro does not have a zoom function - I find this very useful in being able to take out the helmet or other objects out of the picture.

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Old 10-20-2013, 09:33 AM   #58
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Long time DRIFT HD user. How long? I've been thru three remotes, and the rubber skin on my HD is actually melting... But I digress...

Anybody get a DRIFT HD Ghost lately?

Got one from Amazon a couple weeks ago, and went to connect up the remote mic. The rear cover on my DRIFT Ghost is way different than the poster doing the rotating mount. Mine does NOT have a rubber flap to lift and attach the mic. It is a solid piece, with the attachment screw at least twice the size, covering the back width almost completely. While I can take the cover off and plug in the mike, I then lose all dust and waterproofness. Would appear a GIANT step backwards in functionality...

Anybody else seen this, or better yet, found a solution? The DRIFT site does not acknowledge the change in design, nor does the MIC packaging itself. While the enlarged screw does NOT cover the MIC port, it appears that drilling a hole in the back (to enable plugging in the MIC)would be right through the waterproof gasket, and in the curved edge of the back.

At this point the only solution I can see is to dremel out a 5/16" hole in the back to allow the MIC body to fit... What a pita...

From the DRIFT site, you can see the edge of the new attachment screw.
http://store.driftinnovation.com/cam...ost#tab-images
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:54 PM   #59
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My Drift Ghost came with both back covers - the solid one and the one with the rubber flaps over the mic and USB ports.
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Old 10-21-2013, 03:10 PM   #60
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got both

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekinor View Post
my drift ghost came with both back covers - the solid one and the one with the rubber flaps over the mic and usb ports.

mine too
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