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Old 03-21-2013, 05:19 AM   #1
overlandr OP
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Bluhduh Ideas to repair a Leaky shipping container roof

Ok so I bought an 25+ yr old 40' shipping container cheap as a workshop. The main immediate problem is the roof in one area that has obviously had rain water pooling on it for some 10+years with the Ozzie sun bearing down onto it relentlessly.
From inside I noticed a single rusty blister 2" OD with evidence of a small leak below. On the outside of this area, there is an area about 2' x 1' with severe rust. By this I mean multiple thin layers of steel rusting come off when nudged by a screwdriver. I created two small holes (1" sq) easily so then stopped. The container steel is about 0.125" thick - maybe more. I only need to keep the container for another couple of years or so welding is uneconomic.


I am thinking to

1 Get a paint scraper and gently remove all loose flaking rust.
2 Apply some rust neutraliser from above and below and allow capillary action to get it into the
smallest of crevices (phosphoric acid from memory?)
3 Wash off any residues of the acid after a few hours.
4 Apply a rust priming paint that will further neutralise any rust
5 Apply a two pack epoxy filler compound all around the rusted areas from above and below

Would be interested to hear of any ideas as to what I could do to stop the rust from progressing and rain leaking in?

overlandr screwed with this post 03-21-2013 at 05:41 AM
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:25 AM   #2
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Well, fortunately it doesn't have to pretty, does it?

Know anybody who welds? The best fix is going to be to remove the rust, cut out all the bad metal and weld/have welded in a new piece/s and then paint.

Got any pics?
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:50 AM   #3
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I can't imagine that someone you know doesnt have a welder that would be a very quick job.

Cut out a piece of steel oversized, lay it down and run a bead.

Or just use some roofing tar and lay a piece of plywood down and caulk the edges
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:53 AM   #4
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Get some construction adhesive, the stuff designed for decks and subfloors.You are down there so can't give you a product name,up here that would be Lepage PL-400. Cut a steel patch and glue it there. Maybe a few metal roofing screws and some plywood backing on the inside for the screws to go in.

You'll get two years out of that....already got 10 or so from such a repair on galvanized steel roofing.
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:56 AM   #5
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quick and dirty welding wouldn't be much, if any, cheaper than any of the alternatives, unless there are Oz-specific cost factors I don't know of (certainly a possibility) . . . . . . .
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:58 AM   #6
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Thanks but welding is just a much bigger job. I'd have to source steel, cut it to size, a friend I know has a welder but he's not a good welder and there could be a large voltage drop on the end of a long extension lead - the bottom line I'm looking for an easy quick repair that keeps the water out for 2-3 years only. Welding steel would be complete overkill and waste of money as the container is rusting (gently!) all over.

Guess I'm fishing for ideas that are non-welding related.
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Old 03-21-2013, 06:01 AM   #7
overlandr OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H96669 View Post
Get some construction adhesive, the stuff designed for decks and subfloors.You are down there so can't give you a product name,up here that would be Lepage PL-400. Cut a steel patch and glue it there. Maybe a few metal roofing screws and some plywood backing on the inside for the screws to go in.

You'll get two years out of that....already got 10 or so from such a repair on galvanized steel roofing.
Yep I was thinking of something along those lines - silicone bathroom sealant always seems to be hard to remove and I have some tubes of that kicking around.

Edit: We have this stuff called "liquid nails"

http://www.selleys.com.au/trade/buil...-high-strength

but just found this below.

Bonds weaken at high temperatures (e.g. above 50C). Avoid bonding metals or heavy materials which will be heated by direct sun, e.g. to metal roofing and siding. (Consult Selleys about particular applications subject to heating.)

Bugger!
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Old 03-21-2013, 06:03 AM   #8
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If welding is out use one of the adhesives methods but not epoxy. Construction adhesive explained above is a great idea and it's cheap, very cheap, almost no tools required.

I wouldn't bother to clean the rust away but I would clean the surface where the adhesive is going. And by clean I mean reasonably so it will adhere well.
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Old 03-21-2013, 06:12 AM   #9
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Build a quicky roof over it and be done with it,12 pack o beer,some 2x4's,4x4's,then some sort of sheeting,plastic? over the top.

Or Maybe a shed roof style with the 1 raised edge for run off,that could be done with metal or wood attached to one edge and sheet over the whole thing.
A layer over the top would deflect some heat with luck in the summer.

It would require some bodgy engineering,that's where the beer comes in.
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Old 03-21-2013, 06:18 AM   #10
overlandr OP
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Originally Posted by sailah View Post
If welding is out use one of the adhesives methods but not epoxy. Construction adhesive explained above is a great idea and it's cheap, very cheap, almost no tools required.

I wouldn't bother to clean the rust away but I would clean the surface where the adhesive is going. And by clean I mean reasonably so it will adhere well.
I think I'm narrowing in on a solution = sikkaflex 291.

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_pro...06sa01101.html

I used this marine sealant a couple of years ago and it really stuck well to wood, glass, steel and perspex - I tested it compared to silicone and construction sealant and it excelled. Most importantly, it can seal below the water line AND work up to 194F

Service temperature permanent -40 - 194F (-40 C -+90C)

I think it'll work well with some sheet steel - I'm going to still use a rust cure to stop the rust.

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Old 03-21-2013, 06:19 AM   #11
overlandr OP
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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Build a quicky roof over it and be done with it,12 pack o beer,some 2x4's,4x4's,then some sort of sheeting,plastic? over the top.

Or Maybe a shed roof style with the 1 raised edge for run off,that could be done with metal or wood attached to one edge and sheet over the whole thing.
A layer over the top would deflect some heat with luck in the summer.

It would require some bodgy engineering,that's where the beer comes in.
Thanks but its going to have another container on top!
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:05 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlandr View Post
I think I'm narrowing in on a solution.

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_pro...06sa01101.html

I used this marine sealant a couple of years ago and it really stuck well to wood, glass, steel and perspex - I tested it compared to silicone and construction sealant and it excelled. Most importantly, it can seal below the water line AND work up to 194F

Service temperature permanent -40 - 194F (-40 C -+90C)

I think it'll work well with some sheet steel - I'm going to still use a rust cure to stop the rust.
You have Sikaflex down there....go for that.That's good stuff. Stay away from the sillycones, I have tried that on roofs and that always fails after a few years. Better and maybe available are the Butyl type caulkings, they are non hardening and that worked well on my old roof had to recaulk all the nails many years ago, still holding where the sillycone failed.

Went and rechecked the specs on the PL-400, good to 60C, service temperature so probably good for higher temps but that metal sure gets hot in the sun.

I am not a big fan of the Phosphoric Acid based rust converters, the clear type ones. Much better results with the Tannic Acid based ones, they are usually milkish white in appearance. Just bought another liter at the boat shop....pricey but well worth it.

Server errors this morning so can't get into their website....lookup Corroseal "rust converting metal primer".....good stuff.
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:33 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by H96669 View Post
You have Sikaflex down there....go for that.That's good stuff. Stay away from the sillycones, I have tried that on roofs and that always fails after a few years. Better and maybe available are the Butyl type caulkings, they are non hardening and that worked well on my old roof had to recaulk all the nails many years ago, still holding where the sillycone failed.

Went and rechecked the specs on the PL-400, good to 60C, service temperature so probably good for higher temps but that metal sure gets hot in the sun.

I am not a big fan of the Phosphoric Acid based rust converters, the clear type ones. Much better results with the Tannic Acid based ones, they are usually milkish white in appearance. Just bought another liter at the boat shop....pricey but well worth it.

Server errors this morning so can't get into their website....lookup Corroseal "rust converting metal primer".....good stuff.
As you say, container roofs can get very warm sothe higher service temp the better. 60C is not high enough and as SIK 291, being marine grade, can be used below the waterline, its the winner. Must assume that after heavy rain, the roof will be sitting in a poll of water for a several days. I checked the video on yr corroseal but it seems very that the surface must be meticulously prepared which is impractical for me. So will stick with the P/acid in the meantime. I just need to find some sheets of scrap steel. maybe an old oven chopped up??
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:49 AM   #14
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Windshield Adhesive

Cut out the 1' x 2' rust area and glue down an auto side window from the salvage yard using windshield adhesive.

Instant skylight!

Any auto parts store will have the adhesive, and it should hold up well to the baking sun.
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:21 PM   #15
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If you want very instant and very cheap, get yourself your favorite brand silicone/gooey crap that will stick, get a tarp, and then "glue" it down. Might have to redo it every once in awhile, but it would be cheap and quick to repair.

If I were in your shoes, I would source out a welder and some steel and repair it correctly though. I tend to not "repair" stuff cheaply as I hate redoing things.
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