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Old 04-25-2013, 06:22 AM   #91
jaumev
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Whow!! this is a good adventure.
Shure this is going to be the part of your trip you are always remember!!
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Old 04-25-2013, 12:19 PM   #92
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!

Incredible day! Reading your last post was like reading the best part of a good book! Wow I enjoyed it and felt terrible for the things you had to go through.

But you survived and have a good story now to tell your mates once you get back

Stay safe and thanks for the rr.

...oh yeah...would you please buy a skid plate for that strom as soon as possible! You have been seriously lucky not knocking the filter off or worse.
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Old 04-25-2013, 01:43 PM   #93
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Nothing to report

My five hour trip today took six and a half hours. This seems about normal here. Sometimes traffic moves at the speed of a truck, sometimes at the speed of a donkey. Often a bit below the posted speed limit and almost never over it.

Rode 300 km's to my friend Eric's house today, stopped once for fuel and water, took no pictures (other than a guy washing my bike... boring) and no gravel roads or detours. Going to Tangier Med port and the ferry tomorrow. Still a long way to go, but looking forward to being back in Europe.

Bike seems to have survived yesterday's escapades with a somewhat inconsistent back brake but no other obvious damage.
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Old 04-25-2013, 01:46 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mart´n View Post

...oh yeah...would you please buy a skid plate for that strom as soon as possible! You have been seriously lucky not knocking the filter off or worse.
On my short list as soon as I get home. I never thought of getting one as I never intended to do what I've done with it. But I have to say that I'm so impressed with this bike and what it can do. I might get rid of it for one with ABS, but other than that, it's perfect.
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Old 04-25-2013, 02:47 PM   #95
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Dorky matching T-shirt guys

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On my short list as soon as I get home. I never thought of getting one as I never intended to do what I've done with it. But I have to say that I'm so impressed with this bike and what it can do. I might get rid of it for one with ABS, but other than that, it's perfect.
Don't buy a white one! We'd look dorky riding around together on matching bikes... (not that I have one yet, but I sure did like the pics of Tonny's though and there's a brand new 2012 white ABS leftover nearby for $6,999)
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:52 PM   #96
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I don't think you should consider a vstrom with ABS at all if you plan on doing any off roading for two reasons the first one is a 650 is a great bike but the ABS can't be turned off on them if you buy one that has it, The second is if you buy the 1000 it drinks more gas...way more gas and is heavy so you really can't use it offroad but it doesn't come with ABS.
I think that if you like to travel in places like Morocco you need to look at KTM and I don't like them as I own two brand new ones and they were the worst reliable bikes I have ever purchased, BMW might be a choice but they are expensive, husqvarna is ok now new because they have had few years to work out the kinks out of it now that BMW owns them.
A Yamaha 660 would be my first choice in that part of the world for all the reasons...cost, off road capability, reliability, parts availability and the most important thing is weight to power ratio.
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Old 04-26-2013, 10:53 PM   #97
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I should do a real post about Thursday, I guess. I woke up at 4am, unable to sleep, thinking about things that might have gone wrong the day before. It took me quite a while to stop myself from going down that path, not sure why. The kasbah that was my home for the night really was a perfect spot. Breakfast on the terrace and a walk through the garden were both wonderful. Some day I have to bring my wife back here, she'd love it.









Yan helped me drag my bags out to the bike after breakfast, saw my broken turn signal, and immediately produced a roll of duct tape and set to work.


He also had a wrench for bending my luggage mount back into shape.


See the dent in the bottom corner of the side case? Not bad for having been down on that corner at east 5 times, right? Maybe it'll buff out?

Yan said I should bring Sandy back for a relaxing stay, and he and I would rent some trail bikes and he'd show me around the back country the right way. Sounds like fun.

Just down the hill was a gas station with a car wash, which Yan said would be 10 dirhams. The guy there said 20, but I was in no mood to argue over $1.20, so I had him clean up the bike. He blew it off with compressed air and dried it with a chamois, totally worth the price.




Much better.


Then I took off for the main road, 50km's away. I kept looking at the GPS to see "how much farther?" I was still in no mood for adventure, and took the main N13 road all the way to Ifrane. Which is actually nice riding once you get north of Ben Mallil. In fact some of my favorite kind of riding, winding two lane road through rolling countryside. Eventually I put my unease to bed and started to enjoy the trip again. I recognized the place Tonny and I had eaten lunch our first day riding together, the field of red poppies I had taken pictures of. In Azrou I stopped to zip up the vents in my jacket, as it was getting chilly at the high altitude.

I made it to Ifane to Eric and Michelle's about 3:30. He welcomed me, along with his friends Joe and Wali. Eric's been wanting to introduce me to Joe, an American living in Morocco who's also a tinkerer and working on some interesting projets, so we went to take a look. He has a building up in the foothills of the Middle Atlas where he's building a rocket stove for heating, an interesting project. They burn more efficiently than a typical stove, and wood is hard to come by. Joe said fire wood there is valuable enough that when a tree is cut down for fire wood, they also dig up the stump and roots and use that to burn. When I heard this I recognized the wood I had been looking at that morning in my hotel room. By the wood stove was a basket of wood that I couldn't figure out why it was so twisted and gnarly. It was root pieces. Joe is hoping to help develop a heating system that can be built locally and heat efficiently.

On the way back to Ifrane we got to talking about my trip, and Wali asked how much my hotel had been the one night I stayed at the Ibis. When I told him 800 dirhams, he was incredulous. Then we talked on, about my getting lost, and I told about the boy who was scared to rev the engine, the one I gave my whistle to, and about the one who was so happy to be given a ball-point pen. I said next time I come to Morocco I'm going to bring a big bag of pens to give away. Wali said I didn't have to bring them, I could get them at the market, but most rural people don't have any money to buy them. Then he leaned forward from the back seat, put his hand on my shoulder and said "Next time you come, you will stay at my home. I will give you a good dinner, and breakfast and lunch. You will be very comfortable. And you can take that money you would have spent for your hotel, go to the market, buy pens, and give them to children all over Morocco who don't have one."

I think maybe he's on to something.
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Old 04-26-2013, 11:25 PM   #98
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Friday

Over coffee Friday morning Eric handed me a plate and said "This should look familiar". It did.



Eric and Michelle had been at our house in Germany a month ago and we'd made these muffins, which they really liked. Michelle said they can't get baking vanilla or coconut extract in Morocco, so I'd brought some of each along when I came and left them last week. Michelle decided to make the muffins for my return, but couldn't get apple butter, one of the other ingredients. So she found a recipe on the web and made it one night, then made the muffins the next night. One bite was like being home, something I appreciated more than I could say.

Filled up and fueled up, I hit the highway for the port. The road down from Ifrane to Meknes is lined with fields of onions, a pleasant smell in the morning. The farmers have taken the rocks from the fields and stacked them in rows. There's just too many to totally clear them.


Between Meknes and Rabat, along about 100km of highway, I passed by five police radar checkpoints. Don't speed there! I also saw this walk bridge over the highway. A cow-verpass?



Then I took a trunk road that bypasses Rabat and connects to the highway to Tangiers. Along the way came a police bike with lights on, waving traffic to move over. Behind him were about 30 men in Army uniforms, on identical white motocross bikes, wearing identical white helmets. Quite a sight. A training ride, I suppose. I gave them a salute as they went by. Also saw cork trees that have been harvested.



I got to the port about 1230 but the next available ferry was 4pm.


While I waited I got to talking with some guys who had driven up from Senegal in a Nissan mini-van. Their small amount of English and my horrible French somehow worked. One of them eventually asked me how many thousand my bike. I knew he meant the cost, not the mileage, and told him 6,000 Euros, kind of a compromise price between what one would cost in Europe and an exchange of what I paid for it in dollars in the US. He was amazed, I think that I had that much money to spend on a toy. When I told him that this was my first trip to Africa, that I wanted to see it to help me understand it, he said I should come to Senegal, to see it and understand it. Who knows, maybe I will. Paris-dakar, anyone? But not on a V-strom! These guys had bought some bread but no drinks for lunch. I had some left over dirhams so when I went to buy water, I got them a round of Cokes, a little bit of America.

The ferry finally came, and we left 2 hours behind schedule. Goodbye, Africa.


Spain by sunset cruise.


By the time we got to Spain, with the time change (2 hours ahead) it was 9:30pm local time. I rode up the coast to the same hotel I'd stayed at the night before I left for Africa. The same guy was there and welcomed me back, even gave me overnight parking in the garage for free. He said I should hurry if I wanted to find food before things closed, as it was 1030 and this isn't a hopping lively town. I walked down the beach to the same little family pizza place, had the same pizza, same beer, and watched the full moon rise over the ocean.


I thought about Morocco, somewhere over that water. About what I'd seen there. The good rides, the boy who flipped me off as I rode by on the freeway today. About the five Spaniards and the way they played with the kids in the village at the end of the road. About the value of a ball-point pen. I thought about why I was so attracted to the familiar right now, the same hotel, the same dinner. I'm not usually like this. conchscooter was right on when he posted a few days ago and said "don't beleive this is the trip of your lifetime. These journeys have a way of altering our inner compasses... you will be different". I am different. I'm sitting at the same table, but in a different chair, looking out towards Africa and knowing some of what is over there. Some of it I like, some of it bothers me, some of it scares me. If you have the opportunity to experience it, I urge you to do so. But be aware that unless you're very insensitive, you will encounter things that will change you. And that's probably a good thing.
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Old 04-27-2013, 03:41 AM   #99
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really good,... .....thanks for the effort and for speaking out on your fears, gives a realistic view.



BTW, ive ridden past Bitburg a few times, have friends in Zeltingen Rachtig, nice part of Germany

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Old 04-27-2013, 10:15 PM   #100
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A Saturday Night in Toledo...

My hotel doesn't serve breakfast so I went to the cafe down the street, which mistook my order as breakfast for two, I think.


It wasn't as good as it looked, but OK. Then hit the road, going east along the coast on the A-7 (no toll, AP-7 has toll) as far as Malaga. It was really hazy and I couldn't see much except the dark clouds to my left up in the hills. I had thought about trying to make it to Ronda last night but was glad not to be there. But I did go by this.


Quite a change from Morocco! In fact after three days in Morocco, walking into the courtyard of our tourist hotel and seeing a woman in a bikini by the pool was a bit of a startling experience. I've heard people say that the people who go to "naturist" places are often the ones you'd least like to see there, and if the parking lot crowd was a representative sample, this is probably true.

At Malaga I turned north heading to Cordoba. I've wanted to see the Mezquita there, and this would likely be my last chance in a long time.

I'd read someplace that the reason Spain has such diverse culture is the mountains separating the various parts of it, and that was evident today. From Malaga you head up a pass 800 meters high before descending into a fertile valley.


In Cordoba I parked in the local bike park area


Sure wish these were available in the US, it's the perfect bike for my wife, who is 5'2" and struggles with seat height on most bikes.


The Mezquita is one of the most interesting places I've seen.






The 800+ columns are reused Roman pieces from all over, and are of varying height, so some are raised on bases while some are sunk into the floor.


The famous and beautiful double arches are a way to raise the ceiling height on the columns, which are not tall enough on their own.


Old carved roof beams hung like the artwork they are.


As in Sevilla, a courtyard of orange trees.


In a way the feeling in the courtyard echos the columns of the interior.


My guide book said the 15th century Christians had 'ruined' one of the most perfect rooms in the world by building a church in the middle of he Muslim prayer room, which I thought was a bit judgmental way to say it, but after seeing it I have to agree.


But it's also true that the Muslims who built it destroyed a church on the same site to do it. Seems each culture destroys the last one. Here are some mosaics from the 6th century church.


I like the old town area of Cordoba. Walking around town I saw this, one of the few BMW's that could tempt me.


Nice to see it out on the sidewalk as someone's regular transportation rather than in a heated garage and only used once a month. (I could be wrong about that, maybe today was the once a month.)

Also ran into this craft beer place, but with 4 hours of riding left, didn't sample.


I took the N-420 north through a nature park. Would have been a great road at 120km/hr but not so interesting at the 80-90 limit.


From Cordoba to Toledo the route is over high hills and plains, mostly 700-800 meters, and it was COLD! Heated grips, jacket liner, and still shivering without my windscreen, which I miss very much on the highway. I finally made it to Toledo in time for 'sunset' but just scattered rain and dramatic cloud skipping over the mountain tops.


The hotel I'd quickly booked this morning has a heated parking garage and great views of Toledo but is on the south side of the gorge, so it's a 30 minute walk into town. I asked if the hotel had an umbrella (no) but headed out walking anyway.


Before I got to town there was a bar on the side of the gorge with a nice view from the patio. Food was not very good, should have seen the locals were all drinking but not eating. But not such a long walk back and great views.


By the time I walked home, things had changed.


I waited 'til it let up a bit and made it home only slightly damp. The weather for Sunday looks dubious as well, I've been planning to go on the Mediterranean side of the Pyrenees but it's 90% chance of rain there and only 10% chance on the Atlantic side, so that's my new route. I should have come down the Med side, and avoided the rain I had the third day. Oh well.. Might make it to Bordeaux and Saint Emilion, where I should have stopped on the way down.
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Old 04-27-2013, 11:40 PM   #101
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I thought about Morocco, somewhere over that water. About what I'd seen there. The good rides, the boy who flipped me off as I rode by on the freeway today. About the five Spaniards and the way they played with the kids in the village at the end of the road. About the value of a ball-point pen. I thought about why I was so attracted to the familiar right now, the same hotel, the same dinner. I'm not usually like this. conchscooter was right on when he posted a few days ago and said "don't beleive this is the trip of your lifetime. These journeys have a way of altering our inner compasses... you will be different". I am different. I'm sitting at the same table, but in a different chair, looking out towards Africa and knowing some of what is over there. Some of it I like, some of it bothers me, some of it scares me. If you have the opportunity to experience it, I urge you to do so. But be aware that unless you're very insensitive, you will encounter things that will change you. And that's probably a good thing.

I couldn't explain better this feeling.

I've been 3 times in Morocco and each time is the same I need months after returning home to stop thinking in it. Mi mind still there...

Hope I can go next year....

Thanks for sharing your trip
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Old 04-28-2013, 02:35 PM   #102
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I knew it would be a long, cold day, so I started out with pretty much all the warm clothing I had. The thought of running through Spain seemed so wrong, but long sweeping curves and twisty mountain roads are a lot less fun when it's nearly freezing and you're bundled up like Bibebdum. But first, a quick stop for the 'bike in location' shot.


The weather for the Mediterranean side of the Pyrenees was rain, so I went north to the Atlantic side. There were grey skies all around except north, so that was a good sign, right?


The views of Madrid coming in were great, with mountains to the northwest holding back a layer of clouds, but I chose not to stop on the highway for a pic, no safe place with a good view. North of Madrid stopped for this pic just as 3 bikes went by.


I tried to catch up but they exited shortly. I was fighting a fierce headwind all the way, I'd guess 25 mph steady. I usually get an easy 200 miles before I start looking for gas, but this morning I was at my usually 2/5th's by 120 miles. After tanking up I figured it to about 38 miles to the gallon, compared to 53 I got on the way south through France.

Then I started climbing up and up. It got colder and colder. On the way up I saw three of these guys, just waiting.


And at the top, it looked like this.


With a weather advisory for the other side of the pass. What had I gotten myself into this time? A few flakes started falling on my visor as I went into the tunnel. But the north side was clear, even a bit of blue sky showing down on the plain.


I had a nice route planned for the day going up into some hills, back through Pamplona and down to the coast the way I went up 3 weeks ago, but after seeing more snow up there, I changed my plan and stuck to the highway. Boring, but snow is more excitement than i needed. Near Burgos i ran into some snow flurries again, just like 3 weeks ago, and also met those 3 bikers, all riding Suzukis. They said it had been snowing there yesterday as well. Never going back to Burgos! I made it to the foothills of the Pyrenees, which have plenty of white stuff up top.


The route down was pretty nice for a highway. Lots of speed cameras in little zones where 110 goes to 80 with little warning. Hope I was quick enough on the brake! Then around the corner and into France, where the sun was shining on all the cars backed up at the new toll booths.


That was enough for me. I hit the small roads, glad to be back in France.


Even found a village with an American football team, and an American day in August, with choppers!


I didn't know this was a French name.


Finally to my hotel in St. Emilion, where i should have stopped on the 2nd day.


My hotel is just steps from that 'Lard & Bouchon' restaurant i pictured from day 2, but it's closed on Sunday night, as is most of the town. in the end i went to two places and had an appetizer and glass of wine at each.





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Old 04-28-2013, 06:56 PM   #103
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Nice...

Glad to hear you haven't gotten a case of "Get-Home-Itis" and picked up the pace. I'm guilty of that practically every trip I take (Except the Dolomites last fall!) and as soon as I"m showered up I wonder what the hurry was. When it's over it's over. Savor the remainder.... Excited to catch up
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:59 PM   #104
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Monday

Out and on the road at 8AM, with the famous vineyards of St Emilion still covered in the morning fog.


As much as I'm looking forward to being home, running acros France at full speed would be a real waste of a limited opportunity. One extra day isn't going to matter in the end, so I'm trying to enjoy myself all the way home.

I skipped breakfast at the hotel because the only proper breakfast in France is Pain-au-Chocolat from a patisserie, not from a hotel. I rode about half an hour to a village with several patisseries, only one of which was open.


I wondered why, in a seemingly busy village, only one baker / pastry shop was making a go of it. But I got some and went to a nearby bar, where I got coffee, sat outside in the sun and started the day off right. My route had me on small roads for a few hours, some of which were better than others but all were better than the freeway.


My plan was about 800 km's today, all the way to Troyes. Lots of scenery along the way.





I took the speakers out of my helmet when I washed it, trying to get the sand out of the mechanisms, so I don't have music anymore. Plus with the windscreen gone it's too loud to hear music even with earplugs, so I have more time to think now while riding. I got to thinking about the fact that I hadn't checked the tire pressure since leaving home, so looked for a place to do that. I pulled in here but decided to look someplace else.


I was surprised it was closed on a Monday. But soon found another place with a mechanic doing some work on a woman's car while she knitted in his office. He saw me looking at the air hose and came right out with the attachment for filling tires. We managed to communicate the right rpessure, and he put about 5psi in each tire. A definite improvement in ride. I reached in my pocket for money but he shook his head and waved me away. I managed to give him two Euros "for a coffee", and he smiled and accepted that.

Passed by a field full of these things, wonder what they are.


I got to Issoudun about lunch time and was going to enjoy a nice lunch on the square, but all the cafes and shops were closed. I found one bakery open and had a hot goat cheese and bacon sandwhich (YUM!) and asked about why everything was closed. "Monday" was the answer. Huh... everything is closed here on Monday? What a strange town.




So off I went. I was getting a bit low on gas so went to the station. it was closed. I went to the big box store that has a station. It was closed. Most people can buy gas there even if it's closed with their credit card, but the US banks still haven't gotten around to giving us Chip & Pin credit cards, so mine doesn't work in a lot of places in Europe. Including gas station pumps when they are closed! I was getting a little worried, so drive into Bourges and managed to find a small station open, one that is part garage and part station. The big box stores have pretty much put these out of business in France, so I was glad to find it and didn't mind paying 10 cents a liter more for the fuel. It turns out that lots of businesses in France are open Tuesday through Saturday, and closed on Monday. Good thing to know. Get gas before you get off the highway, even if it is a bit higher price.

Then on towards Troyes, largely retracing my route down almos 4 weeks ago. Too bad this place was closed, after Morocco I'm ready to take this on any day!


Passed by a sawmill making barrel staves. Good to know there are plenty in the pipeline for next year. The smell off oak in the air was wonderful if you're a carpentry kind of guy.






I went through Auxerre again, lots of boats on the river and I thought about staying.


Where I parked to take this photo was in front of an Ibis hotel, and since I had a reservation at the Ibis in Troyes, I figured they could help me cancel the one and just stay there and explore the town. But a room in Auxerre is 82 Euros, almost twice the price of my room in Troyes. So on I went.

Finally made it to Troyes about 6:45pm, a town I really like. The main town burned in the 1500's and it all got rebuilt about the same time after that, and much of it still stands as half-timbered buildings, of particular interest to me as I've done some timber frame carpentry and really like it.




But this being Monday, almost everything was closed. I found a little wine shop / cafe and had a nice dinner, salad escargot and salad with octopus.




It almost felt like a celebratory dinner. I'm not home yet, but tomorrow is a short ride over familiar territory. The only bad thing about being in Troyes is that it's one of those romantic places I've been with my wife, and there's nothing so alone as being some romantic place alone. But it's leaves time for wandering a picture taking.


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Old 04-29-2013, 07:38 PM   #105
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Passed by a field full of these things, wonder what they are.
ALLISS shortwave radio broadcasting

I especially like this part of the Wiki entry: ALLISS modules should be geographically scattered for security and RFI exposure reasons. However, few broadcasters have chosen this option mainly due to poor understanding of the technology.

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