ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-10-2013, 03:30 PM   #31
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3sons59 View Post
Thanks for the info. Yes, I make look at a Wee. From everything that I've read about it, it's a solid & well-respected bike that won't break the bank.
I had the DL 1000 and have two SV 650s.
In the bigger bore end I like my Tenere much more than the DL 1000.
I had the Strom for 8 years so it wasn't a matter of not liking it
True to the reputation it was a very reliable ride.

I really like the motors on the 650. If you were looking into the mid size bikes
it and the Versys are worth looking at. Of course no shaft.
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 03:57 PM   #32
RocketJohn
Hook em' Horns!
 
RocketJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Denver Metro
Oddometer: 11,316
I can only recommend where I put my money.

Yamaha Super Tenere.
RocketJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 04:50 PM   #33
vivo
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Oddometer: 93
I'm 59 years old, weight is 190 #, 5' 8 1/2" tall. I currently ride a Stelvio and on the move it feels light. That doesn't mean it is easy to pick up. I had a small parking space tip over on a sloped street with my 190 # girlfriend on the back. Pushed it off the sidestand and first time ever continued going over in the direction of the slope. No damage at all except a small dent in my side case. I could not pick the bike back upright without help.

I plan on practising lifting it upright. Oddly, I still did some gravel roads alone after that mishap. If I was looking for a serious off road bike I would go lighter. For everything else the Stelvio is great. Any of these big bikes will be a bit#h to get upright once you fall off. I think if it came down to leaving the bike and walking I could manage to right it but I was surprised at how heavy such a light handling bike can be.

Vibration isn't really an issue for me but if you like triples and fours this twin will be gruff. I Dont much care for four cylinder bikes anymore and after 9 years of Triumph triples I wanted a change, love the twin.

Vivo
vivo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 05:56 PM   #34
rockmurf
IBA #31100
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Bradenton,FL
Oddometer: 322
I am surprised no one has mentioned this yet but "no valve adjustments."The only bike I am aware of that does not need valve adjustments is the Harley and although they are not shaft drive they are belt driven, they are large, allegedly comfy, but not cheap to keep. When you zero in on a bike definitely let us know because you have almost described the kind of bike I am looking for. I would be all over the r1200gs but for reliability and cost of ownership, same for the ducati multi. Which has me back looking at another fjr. Not an off road bike but absolutely a stud on the blacktop. ps It also meets most of your criteria including no valve adjustments, I have had mine for 120k miles and it has 25k miles valve checks and the valves have never needed adjusting.
rockmurf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 08:08 PM   #35
stevie88
That's gotta hurt
 
stevie88's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: The place dad always warned me about
Oddometer: 17,811
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3sons59 View Post
Dang good-looking bike! Tell me about it:
how long you've had it?
how many miles?
how dependable is it?
if it has a low cost of ownership?
are handlebar buzz & mirror vibrations an issue?
etc. (anything else you care to add)
Thanks, I replaced an 08 GSA with it back in December. I've got 5500 miles on it thus far. It's not had a hiccup thus far. Since I'm 375 miles from the nearest dealer I plan on doing the tune ups at home so I've purchased a Harmonizer to use for balancing the throttle bodies and the software and cables from GuzziTech to complete the process. Valve adjustments look very easy.

The longest single day ride was last Sunday, 725 miles on a bunch of back roads. The stock seat is outstanding, the ergonomics are similar to the GSA but the bike sits a few inches lower, the center of gravity seems much lower, it's got a nice compliant suspension. I had the dealer install heated grips and the euro turn signals before I picked it up, works better and looks better than the DOT required turn signals stuck in the mirror housings. I removed the rubber pads from the food pegs and vibration isn't a problem for me there or at the grips.

I've owned 4 cylinder Japanese bikes, Harleys, the big VStrom, an LT, an RT and the GSA and still own a Ducati Monster Tricolour, BMW Boxercup Replica, Tenni Green Griso SE and the Stelvio. The 2 Guzzies push my happy buttons better than any bikes I've ever owned.
__________________
In Russia we have saying, "if it isn't broke, don't fix it". We also say, "if it is broke, don't fix it".
stevie88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 08:20 PM   #36
schrabs
Adventurer
 
schrabs's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Black Forest, Germany / Santa Rosa, CA
Oddometer: 41
Maybe this works for you: Why not rent a GS for a few days and try it in real life situations, whatever that is to you. I did so 2 years ago (rented from Eaglerider in SF off season in march, about 100$/day) and did 3500 mls on it in 10 days, mainly twisties and gravel in CA and the desert. After that you know if it still is your dreambike or if it is merely a compromise a lot of riders are happy with. My personal conclusion is that most of the praise written about the GS has some truth to it but the bike never "touched my soul", if you know what I mean. I actually found it to be a pretty boring bike afterall... Would be terrible if you spend all that money just to find out it's not for you.
schrabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 09:12 AM   #37
my3sons59 OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Oddometer: 37
Very interesting post. It sounds like you're VERY happy with the Stelvio. A few questions:
* Do you have ANY regrets getting rid of the GSA?
* Other than periodic tune-ups & valve adjustments, do MG's have a reputation for being bullet proof, gas-n-go bikes?
* I haven't come across any horror stories about FD failures on MG's. I assume their shaft drives are far more dependable than BMW's?
* I looked up the Harmonizer on the 'net, and it looks like they're about $140. May I ask the approx. cost of the other parts (software & cables) that you purchased to do the tuneups?
* Is the TB adjustment & tuneup very complicated, or can someone like myself with reasonable mechanical ability handle this?
*Since you've owned & ridden both for thousands of miles, can you elaborate on the advantages/disadvantages of the BMW versus the Stelvio?

I, too, am hundreds of miles from the closest MG dealer. However, I plan to call them to see if they offer rentals. If so, I plan to rent one for a day & try one on for size!

Thanks for the info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevie88 View Post
Thanks, I replaced an 08 GSA with it back in December. I've got 5500 miles on it thus far. It's not had a hiccup thus far. Since I'm 375 miles from the nearest dealer I plan on doing the tune ups at home so I've purchased a Harmonizer to use for balancing the throttle bodies and the software and cables from GuzziTech to complete the process. Valve adjustments look very easy.

The longest single day ride was last Sunday, 725 miles on a bunch of back roads. The stock seat is outstanding, the ergonomics are similar to the GSA but the bike sits a few inches lower, the center of gravity seems much lower, it's got a nice compliant suspension. I had the dealer install heated grips and the euro turn signals before I picked it up, works better and looks better than the DOT required turn signals stuck in the mirror housings. I removed the rubber pads from the food pegs and vibration isn't a problem for me there or at the grips.

I've owned 4 cylinder Japanese bikes, Harleys, the big VStrom, an LT, an RT and the GSA and still own a Ducati Monster Tricolour, BMW Boxercup Replica, Tenni Green Griso SE and the Stelvio. The 2 Guzzies push my happy buttons better than any bikes I've ever owned.
my3sons59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:05 AM   #38
cug
--
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Sunny California
Oddometer: 4,842
I'm sorry to throw that out and please don't get me wrong but for me this discussion becomes kind of ridiculous ...

Somebody you don't know, have never seen, never ridden with regrets or doesn't regret selling or buying a bike means anything for you? "Horror stories" are around for everything and everybody. You just have to search long enough and believe in all the nay-sayers on the Web. You know "it's on the Web, it has to be true" ...

Man up, go to the dealers, ride the frigging bikes and buy what you like. A cable, a manual, or a Harmonizer are all peanuts compared to the price of the bike. Just plan for "additions" you will want to have anyways sooner or later.

These bikes all work pretty damn well, shaft or chain, twin or triple, v or boxer or inline, it all doesn't matter one single bit if you don't like riding it.

All this theorizing is total BS and will not get you anywhere near a decision that'll make you happy while riding. It might help you "justify buying something" but if that's what you want, buy a Prius. Or a Leaf. Because if that's all you go by you'll end up whining about everything that isn't absolutely 100% perfect for you on the bike you'll end up with - if you buy specs and not the riding experience you like, every single niggling thing will drive you nuts.
cug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:18 AM   #39
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,064
Oh sure. Bring logic into the discussion. Way to go Cug.
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:27 AM   #40
cug
--
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Sunny California
Oddometer: 4,842
Quote:
Originally Posted by pluric View Post
Oh sure. Bring logic into the discussion. Way to go Cug.
Actually, I try to bring "feel and passion" to the discussion. I think all the bikes mentioned are great and have their different feel and "character". There is absolutely nothing a logical discussion can bring to light that will help deciding whether a particular person will like a bike or not.

But okay ... I shut up now ...
cug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:30 AM   #41
Cloudhopper
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Dublin
Oddometer: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3sons59 View Post
[...]
* Other than periodic tune-ups & valve adjustments, do MG's have a reputation for being bullet proof, gas-n-go bikes?
* I haven't come across any horror stories about FD failures on MG's. I assume their shaft drives are far more dependable than BMW's?

I, too, am hundreds of miles from the closest MG dealer. However, I plan to call them to see if they offer rentals. If so, I plan to rent one for a day & try one on for size!

Thanks for the info.
I'm a fairly new Stelvio owner, but i did months of reading before test riding one. I didn't find any stories that would indicated to me a problem with reliability. I'm almost 3 hours away from the nearest dealer, so this was key for me.
The FD seems to have litttle problems. I only found an account that prolonged submersion of the CARC can cause water to enter through the ventilation valve (the valve that BMW doesnt have, which is causing most of their FD issues), making an oil replacement necessary. But not everyone experienced that, I put it down as "one of those things". I'm not planning on crossing too many rivers with my Stelvio by any other means than bridges and ferries.

I have to agree with schrabs on the R1200GS. It left me cold during my test ride. It's "a good bike" and all, but it didn't touch me, didn't tingle my soul. And I hated the stock seat after 15 minutes.
The Stelvio test ride on the other hand, she got me the moment i pressed that red button. I actually giggled and laughed under me helmet, made me feel rather silly. Yes she vibes a bit, it's a 1.2 liter v-twin.

The best advise regarding the Stelvio is "ride one". Guzzis aren't for everyone and most Guzzi riders will agree that the engine is dominant. But thats part of the appeal, that's what it's about.
If it's not for you, walk away and no hard feelings, however you have to ride one to know it.

And if a Guzzi is for you, it'll make you smile till it hurts.
__________________
Bikes:
Moto Guzzi Stelvio
BMW F650GS
Cloudhopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:47 AM   #42
pluric
Gimpy Adventurer
 
pluric's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake
Oddometer: 16,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by cug View Post
But okay ... I shut up now ...
No, no, no. I get your point completely. Normally these threads end up
with "Start with a KLR and see if ......."
pluric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 10:53 AM   #43
Pampero
Verbose Adventurer
 
Pampero's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Oddometer: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by cug View Post
I'm sorry to throw that out and please don't get me wrong but for me this discussion becomes kind of ridiculous ...

Somebody you don't know, have never seen, never ridden with regrets or doesn't regret selling or buying a bike means anything for you? "Horror stories" are around for everything and everybody. You just have to search long enough and believe in all the nay-sayers on the Web. You know "it's on the Web, it has to be true" ...

Man up, go to the dealers, ride the frigging bikes and buy what you like. A cable, a manual, or a Harmonizer are all peanuts compared to the price of the bike. Just plan for "additions" you will want to have anyways sooner or later.

These bikes all work pretty damn well, shaft or chain, twin or triple, v or boxer or inline, it all doesn't matter one single bit if you don't like riding it.

All this theorizing is total BS and will not get you anywhere near a decision that'll make you happy while riding. It might help you "justify buying something" but if that's what you want, buy a Prius. Or a Leaf. Because if that's all you go by you'll end up whining about everything that isn't absolutely 100% perfect for you on the bike you'll end up with - if you buy specs and not the riding experience you like, every single niggling thing will drive you nuts.
This is the best advice on this thread. People generally buy what they like (however they arrive to the notion of "what they like") and then justify the decision later. Also, every problem becomes une grande catastrophe on the websites.

Fifty something is way too young except as a metaphor or an attempt at humor to take all the joy out of riding and pretend that any motorcycle can somehow be a totally intellectually driven purchase.
One wants not to be an old fart, not to reinforce the feeling. Follow the heart, buy what moves you. There isn't a bad choice, only the wrong one, and you make that when listening only to others. At 67, I absolutely love riding my MTS12. It makes me smile. When or if it stops doing that I will buy another, different bike and start again.

You need to ride them, young man. Most of what you'll get here is folks (rightly or wrongly) justifying their decisions. I have owned one or more of almost every brand under discussion here (absent Yamaha) and none of them are perfect, all of them are desirable depending on intended purpose. I particularly am amused at the out of hand dismissal of the Ducati, the most fun bike I rode when I shopped this herd six months ago.

Mine's been excellent. I don't recommend it to you per se or because I have one. I do recommend you ride them all and then come back to talk. Until then, all you know is what you think you know.

Pampero screwed with this post 04-11-2013 at 02:41 PM
Pampero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 11:05 AM   #44
phoenixdoglover
Where to next?
 
phoenixdoglover's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Oddometer: 111
Variety is the Spice of Life

Look at it this way: isn't it great to have so many choices?

However I agree with some of the other comments, that the discussion of pros and cons just wont make a decision for you; riding a few bikes should do the trick.

That being said, I too have the Stelvio NTX (EU spec). It has that Guzzi character; the engine has many happy voices. What surprised me was the balance and handling; nice for a big bike. And on dirt/gravel roads it is stable. The seat is wide and comfortable. I do get some buzz in the hands, but it doesn't bother me. I have about 4,000 miles on it...no issues.

If I had the choice again, what I get a Stelvio? I don't know. The new KTM 1190 looks awesome; the Super Tenere is no slouch and better on dirt than most big bikes. The Multistrada would be a kick to ride; probably get me thrown in jail. I'm less enthused about BMW's (I think, like you, I am a bit scared of the maintenance), but the F800GS looks like a fine machine, so I would ride one if I got the chance.

Good luck young fella!

Dave (58 years)
__________________
2009 KLR650
2009 Suzuki C50T
2011 Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX
phoenixdoglover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 01:25 PM   #45
RocketJohn
Hook em' Horns!
 
RocketJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2002
Location: Denver Metro
Oddometer: 11,316
My Father didn't learn to ride until he was 50 and now he's been riding for 20 years... 50 is young...

And Dave is right... the immense flavors of Adv Bikes we get to choose from is staggering, compared to just 10 years ago...
RocketJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014