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Old 10-07-2013, 09:37 AM   #1
Dr. Greg OP
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Patch recommendation for like-new tubeless tire?

So I just mounted some TKC-80s on my GS LC; probably have 150 miles on them. Before today's ride check pressure, OOPS, rear is low...yep, it's got a small nail.

I've already ordered a new tire (like to have an extra around anyway). But this tire is SO NEW...

I'm going to dismount the tire and try to patch it from the inside; never done this before (I use a string plug kit for "on the road" repairs).

Any recommendations for type of patch? My "patching" has been limited to bicycle and dirt-bike tubes. Thanks.

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Old 10-07-2013, 12:16 PM   #2
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I've been there. But not with a TKC.
I went to a local car tyre business. In addition to the patch glued on the inside they also plugged the hole. Lasted a few thousand miles until the tyre wore out.
Maybe ask a local tyre shop to sell you a few plugs and patches?
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:38 PM   #3
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Go to a car tire place and ask them to sell you a patch-plug. Goes in from inside. It's a plug and patch in one.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:03 PM   #4
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+1 for patch plug

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Old 10-07-2013, 05:19 PM   #5
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That's cool!
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:08 AM   #6
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DIY with the patch plug. I used to be the tire jockey long time ago, never practiced much patching over the last 40 years. Just did last week.

Biggest hurdle depends on the tire, some have ribs on the inside and they can be a pain to sand flat. Of course I could have used the air tools BUT doing it by hand may come in very useful on the road someday.

Local tire shop will patch motorcycle tires if we remove them from the rim. But I'd rather DIY and just last year had a flat on my car. Free flat repairs at the same shop and they always let me watch and answer my questions. Just to say that the techniques haven't changed from the old days.
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Old 10-09-2013, 07:27 AM   #7
30Bones
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Same thing happened on my new Sprint in 08. Plug patch and put another 5K miles on it.
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Old 10-09-2013, 10:42 AM   #8
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go to walmart and get a tire repair kit. It has two tools, one to drill little bigger hole than the nail hole. Then there is a peace of rubber and a tube of rubber glue. You pull the nail, drill the hole, put the plug into the second tool and put glue on it. Then drive the plug into the hole with the tool, and pull the tool out (I know how it sounds!). Then cut off the excess part of the plug and let it sit for couple of hours. Pump up the tire and ready to go. I did this and put another 20,000 miles on the truck tire. The kit is $3.
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Old 10-09-2013, 11:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nedodjija View Post
go to walmart and get a tire repair kit. It has two tools, one to drill little bigger hole than the nail hole. Then there is a peace of rubber and a tube of rubber glue. You pull the nail, drill the hole, put the plug into the second tool and put glue on it. Then drive the plug into the hole with the tool, and pull the tool out (I know how it sounds!). Then cut off the excess part of the plug and let it sit for couple of hours. Pump up the tire and ready to go. I did this and put another 20,000 miles on the truck tire. The kit is $3.
While agree, I also am a firm believer in plug patches for a piece of mind. The extra cost is minimal
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Old 10-09-2013, 01:14 PM   #10
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Patch recommendation

An externally inserted plug may suffice as a roadside repair but I wouldn't use it other than for an emergency. The patch and plug installed from the inside is a reliable, safe repair when done properly. That means sanding the inside of the tire, cleaning and drying the patch area (use a hair dryer or other heat gun to dry it), then apply the adhesive and the patch. Be sure to use some kind of roller to ensure the entire patch is sealed to the inner tire surface.
Take your time and do it right. It's not like we've got 3 other wheels to get us off the road if the patch fails!
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:58 PM   #11
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I'm surprised no one has asked where the nail went into the tire at.
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Old 10-10-2013, 02:19 PM   #12
nedodjija
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodsbrick View Post
An externally inserted plug may suffice as a roadside repair but I wouldn't use it other than for an emergency. The patch and plug installed from the inside is a reliable, safe repair when done properly. That means sanding the inside of the tire, cleaning and drying the patch area (use a hair dryer or other heat gun to dry it), then apply the adhesive and the patch. Be sure to use some kind of roller to ensure the entire patch is sealed to the inner tire surface.
Take your time and do it right. It's not like we've got 3 other wheels to get us off the road if the patch fails!
Have over 20K on my truck tire since I put the plug in. No issues at all. There is not that many motorcycle tires that will last longer than that.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:49 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nedodjija View Post
Have over 20K on my truck tire since I put the plug in. No issues at all. There is not that many motorcycle tires that will last longer than that.
One data point, does not a statistically significant sample, make.


I'd to the same thing though
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