ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-01-2013, 07:15 AM   #46
sphyrnidus
born to ride
 
sphyrnidus's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Netherlands
Oddometer: 121
Of course the GS is one of the best bikes there is for riding in the mountains. That won't be the problem.
Now some advice:
Riding is all about looking where you are going. Especially in corners. Look where you want to go and the beast listens to you. So if you are in a tight corner, like a hairpin, look all the way trough it. Don't look to the side of the road, 'cause that is where you"ll end up.

You ride a GS, it breaks tremendously well on just letting the gas handle go. So try not to use the break too much, just let go of the gas and it'll slow down beautifully. The result is: it won't dive down and won't shift the weight so much to the front.

Try counter steering. Get on the YouTube and search for counter steering. It will help you a lot getting trough the corners.

Always stay on the outside of the curve and when you can see through the curve, then steer toward the inside. It'll make you stay away form on comming traffic and also provides you with a better view of what is comming i.e. you can look farther ahead. We even teach beginners to use (all or part) of the lane of the oncomming traffic., so you have a good view, if you see a car etc. comming ease over to your own lane.
Get your speed right at the beginning of the curve and start accelerating out of the curve while at the summit.

Btw I'm 60 and ride a lot in the mountains on a GSA and I ride ahead of groups to learn them how to ride (and survive :) )
__________________
If your destination is unknown, you'll always arrive
sphyrnidus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 09:20 AM   #47
jnclem OP
True Airhead
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Gunnison, CO.
Oddometer: 320
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moronic View Post
jnclem, sounds like you have got the answer you were looking for.

I am always sceptical about how much help a board like this can be for riding concerns that mostly defy accurate description. It is great when someone gets something back that he (or she) can use.

It might be fun if you replied to this thread when you've tried out your Adv-enhanced insight.
Planning on it. Probably will be riding over Black Mesa on Saturday. It's a wonderful, low traffic, very curvy, local road that runs along the edge of the 2000' deep Black Canyon of the Gunnison. That should do the trick.
jnclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2013, 08:01 PM   #48
jnclem OP
True Airhead
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Gunnison, CO.
Oddometer: 320
I do appreciate all, well, most, of the advice I got in this thread. Today I did a steeper, curvier ride than last week, and was much more comfortable. I applied a few things that some of you posted in this thread, and it worked. Here are the things I was working on:

1. I sat more forward in the twisties. In this position I feel more "centered" in the bike, and it simply feels like a more aggressive posture. Odd, but it is more than just a weight shift, I'm not sure I can describe it, but I think my whole focus goes further down the road. Sounds wacked I know, but that's how it feels.

2 & 3. There was a lot of discussion about a lower entry speed in downhill corners, and braking going in to set the suspension. I thought about that a lot during the week. While all of that is true, I don't think I was so much going into the turn too fast, as I was braking, with engine and or brakes, long, early, and gently, then rolling into the turn in a sort of lazy fashion, and accelerating out.

Today I started coming up to the turn with just a touch more speed, braking, with engine and or brakes, with a little more authority, then dropping into the turn. I'm not talking about jamming on the brakes, or snapping off the throttle, just doing things a little more sharply. I could feel the suspension compress a bit, then I could roll into the turn effortlessly, and everything felt much more solid. I was getting a greater lean angle, and the bike just felt like it was in the perfect groove. Again, hard to describe.

This is all on nice clean dry pavement, and I am not talking about any high speed here. I was very much in control. It was simply amazing how much difference just a couple of tweaks made. So thanks, now I will need a lot more practice!

And if any of you have never ridden The Black Mesa between Gunnison and Crawford Colorado, you really should put it on your list.
jnclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2013, 09:23 PM   #49
PT Rider
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: NW Washington State
Oddometer: 632
The pesky thing about riding downhill in the mountains is that right after one tight downhill turn comes another downhiller! Yes, brake going into the turn to get your speed way down, then very lightly roll on some throttle through the turn, then brake for the next turn, etc.

Approach a left turn wide on the right side. Brake as you ride deep into the turn, then turn sharpest as you're at your slowest speed. Come to the inside of the turn about 2/3rds of the way through the turn, except...because you entered wide and deep, you can see what you're getting into and set your line to avoid hazards or to ride the best line to set up for a smooth next turn. On a left turn, don't let any part of your body cross the yellow line--give on coming drivers room to miss you. Reverse the instructions for a right turn.

Be sure you don't lean away from the turn. Lean your upper body toward the pavement to the inside of the turn. Point your chin at your turn exit. Look through the turn and keep your eyes level. Feel like you're taking control of the turn, not merely reacting to the turn.

Steer with only your inside hand. Approaching a left turn, for example, push the left grip to make the left turn. Push harder to turn sharper. Pull back to straighten. Relax your outside hand and arm. Relax both.

If there is a Lee Parks Total Control riding class near you, take it. Or any other high level street riding class.

Buy these books:
Keith Code A Twist of the Wrist -- II (or 2) Code lists "Survival Reactions" that are natural, instinctive, and wrong! Never do these.
Lee Parks Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques
If you get into it, get Bernt Spiegel The Upper Half of the Motorcycle: On the Unity of Rider and Machine It has some Teutonic heaviness, but is great.
__________________
It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.
Henry David Thoreau
PT Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2013, 10:54 PM   #50
morena67
Adventurer
 
morena67's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Location: Acapulco. Mexico.
Oddometer: 60
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrSEmsmj8Bw


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkvOACPnQjU

-Tought would help...
__________________
2005 YAMAHA XT660X
"My mouth was drier than an Egyptian’s sandal and my palms sweatier than a fat girl’s bra". Jamie Robinson.
morena67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 12:36 AM   #51
ibafran
villagidiot
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: chicagoland
Oddometer: 1,241
Quote:
Originally Posted by morena67 View Post
I liked that one a lot. Thanx. I am going to pass that one round.
__________________
"beware the grease mud. for therein lies the skid demon."-memory from an old Honda safety pamphlet
ibafran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2013, 03:17 AM   #52
advNZer?
Beastly Adventurer
 
advNZer?'s Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Wellington,New Zealand
Oddometer: 2,695
i reckon a lot of motorcyclists dont like the feel of the bike when its truly coasting..they either like to be accellerating or braking but not coasting...i cant describe it but it almost feels like its going to fall over,but it wont,Getting comfortable with this feeling makes it easier to ride downhill.Sometime i might drag the rear brake slightly right into the apex of a curve if the gradient is more than i have anticipated.
__________________
aka BMWST?
advNZer? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 07:02 AM   #53
Tripped1
Likely Lost.
 
Tripped1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sandy Eggo
Oddometer: 7,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnclem View Post
1. I sat more forward in the twisties. In this position I feel more "centered" in the bike, and it simply feels like a more aggressive posture. Odd, but it is more than just a weight shift, I'm not sure I can describe it, but I think my whole focus goes further down the road. Sounds wacked I know, but that's how it feels.
The egronomic position the bike puts you in should always be accounted for when you forearms are level with the ground. In sport applications its usually a lot more aggressive than many riders actaully use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnclem View Post
2 & 3. There was a lot of discussion about a lower entry speed in downhill corners, and braking going in to set the suspension. I thought about that a lot during the week. While all of that is true, I don't think I was so much going into the turn too fast, as I was braking, with engine and or brakes, long, early, and gently, then rolling into the turn in a sort of lazy fashion, and accelerating out.
Accounting for a later apex helps as well. This would vary with your braking method (trail or snap turning) as well.

Its also why you shouldn't outride your site lines on the road unless you know it VERY VERY well. I've been known to do a pass on certain twisty sections are low speed and I mean coasting speed, just to see the conditions and look for obstacles before I even go to an amusing speed, which is still something like 5/6 tenths.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jnclem View Post

Today I started coming up to the turn with just a touch more speed, braking, with engine and or brakes, with a little more authority, then dropping into the turn. I'm not talking about jamming on the brakes, or snapping off the throttle, just doing things a little more sharply. I could feel the suspension compress a bit, then I could roll into the turn effortlessly, and everything felt much more solid. I was getting a greater lean angle, and the bike just felt like it was in the perfect groove. Again, hard to describe.
What you are feeling is weight bias on the bike's geometry. When the front suspension compresses, you are increasing the rake, and decreasing trail, both of which make the bike more responsive to left/right inputs. At an advanced level this is ALSO where trailbraking comes in very handy, the idea being to keep the front suspension in one place going from the brakes into the apex. Basically replacing the suspension compression due to breaking with the compression from turning the corner.

Nailing it is a thing of beauty, but its pretty hard to practice without a track, parkling lot speed is generally to low, and on the street is a little dangerous.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jnclem View Post

This is all on nice clean dry pavement, and I am not talking about any high speed here. I was very much in control. It was simply amazing how much difference just a couple of tweaks made. So thanks, now I will need a lot more practice!
Everyone should always be practicing, the learning curve for motorcycling is infinite, there is always something you can be doing better, no matter how long you ride.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jnclem View Post

And if any of you have never ridden The Black Mesa between Gunnison and Crawford Colorado, you really should put it on your list.
I live on the wrong side of the country now, but thanks for the tip.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by RottenScummyTroll View Post
Show folks something with a clutch and carburetor, and it's like teaching a baboon to use a Macbook.
Tripped1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 07:19 AM   #54
fltplan
Just toolin around
 
fltplan's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Southwest
Oddometer: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madrox View Post
Once the throttle is cracked on, it is rolled on evenly, smoothly, and constantly throughout the remainder of the turn.

Drill that into your brain
I've heard that before. That's a Keith Code quote I've heard numerous times.
fltplan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014