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Old 04-28-2013, 09:18 PM   #1
One Fat Roach OP
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Location: Bellingham Washington
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noob frustration

Recently I've been having trouble finding a replacement throttle cable and yesterday I rode the bus over an hour to take the old one to a Honda shop ( I refuse to buy another car, maybe one day a small pickup). The two guys there were stumped when they saw what i brought in, apparently it was off a snowmobile. 3 weeks later i have a new cable on the way to match this crazy ass carburetor as the previous owner installed.
Every time i go to do some "routine" repair or maintenance it turns out to be a huge hassle because the previous owner ghetto rigged so many things to keep it running. In one way I'm glad to learn on my first bike but in another I'm hitting a breaking point wanting to just sell the bike and save for another. But if i do that I'll miss out on tons of riding. Needless to say I've learned many things on and off my first bike. Any words of wisdom from the Master Jedi's?? =/
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:25 PM   #2
GSguy
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Buy a snowmobile to match the throttle cable
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:41 PM   #3
macd7919
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FWIW it's not the most fun experience but its a good one to have. Dealing with the maintenance and quirks of an older bike will pay off in dividends later in your riding life. You may get rid of the bike but you will never forget the lessons you learned and those may just be the ones that get you back to the truck when your 50 miles out in the woods.

Not to mention you will be a better rider starting out on a bike like that XL then you would be trying to learn on a new 450 for instance. When you don't have power to cover your mistakes you learn to ride smoothly and maintain momentum, your ability to choose lines is much better than a rider who relies on 45hp and huge suspension travel to carry them through (I won't get started on auto clutches). Take the time on this bike as the time to develop your skills, when you can ride an underpowered/under suspended bike quickly and smoothly then you will be able to ride anything quickly and smoothly. Always remember the saying "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast".

Btw, read some old articles on the legends, they all started out on bikes that weren't the latest and greatest (and in many instances were basket cases) and they developed their skills first, faster bikes came later. A guy that's fast on a 20 year old bike is generally a missle once you throw them on a late model machine, flip that the other way and you generally have a rider who can get by on the trails with his 2012 but throw him back 20 years on an older machine and he's begging for mercy after 5 miles.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:44 PM   #4
Walterxr650l
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Start looking for another bike. Preferably as close to stock as possible. You can modify it to suit yourself, but at least you will know what was done. Then sell the one you have.

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Old 04-29-2013, 06:55 AM   #5
eric n
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carb

snowmobile carbs are often put on bikes because they adjust for elevation. its smart actually. 18,000 feet down to 1,000 and it wont foul a plug. and you can get it started again at the top of a mountain.

low elevation carb jets will run to rich in higher elevations. adjust the jets for higher elevations and you can burn valves at sea level.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:32 AM   #6
n16ht5
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You can get 90s xr250s for under 1k all day....

Bike bandit.com is your pal
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Old 04-29-2013, 10:25 AM   #7
woodsrider-boyd
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I would sell the troublesome bike and get a more "stock" bike. Too many great inexpensive bikes out there to be dealing with someone else's project when you want to be riding - unless a project is what you want.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:30 PM   #8
caponerd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macd7919 View Post
FWIW it's not the most fun experience but its a good one to have. Dealing with the maintenance and quirks of an older bike will pay off in dividends later in your riding life. You may get rid of the bike but you will never forget the lessons you learned and those may just be the ones that get you back to the truck when your 50 miles out in the woods.

Not to mention you will be a better rider starting out on a bike like that XL then you would be trying to learn on a new 450 for instance. When you don't have power to cover your mistakes you learn to ride smoothly and maintain momentum, your ability to choose lines is much better than a rider who relies on 45hp and huge suspension travel to carry them through (I won't get started on auto clutches). Take the time on this bike as the time to develop your skills, when you can ride an underpowered/under suspended bike quickly and smoothly then you will be able to ride anything quickly and smoothly. Always remember the saying "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast".

Btw, read some old articles on the legends, they all started out on bikes that weren't the latest and greatest (and in many instances were basket cases) and they developed their skills first, faster bikes came later. A guy that's fast on a 20 year old bike is generally a missle once you throw them on a late model machine, flip that the other way and you generally have a rider who can get by on the trails with his 2012 but throw him back 20 years on an older machine and he's begging for mercy after 5 miles.
I started my life on motorcycles with a hacked up, jury rigged pile of bolts, and the lessons have indeed served me ever since.
You'll learn how to improvise repairs and alter parts to fit (or make your own) when the right parts aren't available. Those are skills that anyone wanting to be an "adventure rider" will need sooner or later.
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by caponerd View Post
I started my life on motorcycles with a hacked up, jury rigged pile of bolts, and the lessons have indeed served me ever since.
You'll learn how to improvise repairs and alter parts to fit (or make your own) when the right parts aren't available. Those are skills that anyone wanting to be an "adventure rider" will need sooner or later.
that's one of the main reasons I would like to keep it. But it's such a Frankenstein motorcycle. I'll have it running fine for maybe 3-6 weeks then something will come up that needs repaired and it will be out of commission for just as long if not longer. Whatever I try to replace isn't the stock part and its very frustrating using my manual to do something but it's not possible. I've had the bike 3 years. Its my first and only bike, I love it, I do but I hate it too Lol.

I've used bikebandit a few times the most recent for a new air filter. It said it was a universal fit and when I went to install it the filter was too short, it has a gap on each end. Aggravating as hell.
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Old 04-30-2013, 03:59 AM   #10
BenDiesel
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I feel your pain kinda. I pulled the carbs off my 86 xr and found that some one got the bowls on the swapped on the carbs. No wonder the choke lever never worked

Eric n - that's interesting bout the snowmobile carbs. I'll have to look more into that.
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Old 05-01-2013, 03:29 AM   #11
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All good

Bassplay, Caponerd hit it on the head, all...........good.

Regardless of what you buy inventing will be the game in the end. Some of the comments would have you believe that the model they own is easily accessible to parts, not so. In this state with B.O. tax most dealers don't supply half their parts and you will wait even when available, can't fault them.

As Caponerd stated what you learn will serve you well regardless of make or model.

Some have no concept of your budget restraints that might be. You said you liked the bike and that is the key factor.

Admittedly I try to buy bikes parts are available for, and I don't ride Honda, (great bikes) but I can't think of a bike with better parts support.

Dryfuse
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:23 PM   #12
One Fat Roach OP
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So the throttle cable kit I ordered finally came today. I hope it fits. So far $100 on would be matches. find out if it fits tomorrow.



On another note, I need a new air filter. The twin air one I ordered off bike bandit doesn't match, there is about a quarter inch gap on each side. And the old on I removed looks just like a thin piece of average foam zip-tied to secure it. It doesn't look like one you would typically want but like other discoveries on the bike, maybe a home made fit?? The Honda shop was out of stock... Go figure. Any suggestions where else to look or should I wait til they have em in stock?

I'm losing my patience... I just want to fuggin riiiiiide
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Old 05-01-2013, 06:06 PM   #13
what broke now
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Just a stab in the dark, the filter looks like a simple cylinder in the parts fiche.
The Motosport site claims the part is "unavailable from manufacturer"
Maybe something like this is what was on it and what will work with some careful fitting and maybe a filter skin over it for nice:


https://www.denniskirk.com/bulk-air-...prd/301500.sku
Uni is a common piece at many shops.

Just a wag, I don't own one.
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:59 AM   #14
michaelyogi
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Ya' know, seems I had enough maintenance work, repair and learning to do when I had a 2003 Suzi DRZ 400... and the parts are readily available and cheap (relatively). I still have plenty to do with my '09 Husky... hell I just did fork seals. Plenty to learn...
Older motorcycles get left behind in the parts department. I've heard of a shop in Seattle that has bins and bins of older MC parts that have been salvaged. Might be a place you need to find and visit. A 30 y/o MC is gettin' vintage and vintage is all about... working on your bike.
If it's all about riding, get a newer bike... so you can spend more time riding than working on your bike. You'll have plenty of work to do on the newer MC.
Good luck and .
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:29 AM   #15
turnsleft
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If you still have the housing find a cable of the right length and solder on a end.

Use the soldering iron to take the end off the old/broken cable, unless it is a cast on one.

If you are going to ride a conglomeration put your imagination face on. Have fun building parts for old bikes is kinda fun. A picture of the carb would be good.
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