ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Day Trippin'
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-04-2013, 12:57 PM   #46
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Day 4 (May 29th)

Up at 9 AM, it was time to start the 3-day journey home. The first day was a short trip up the Blue Ridge Parkway and a few stops, but my plans fell apart. The first stop was supposed to be Wheels Through Time, but they're not open on Wednesdays. The second stop was supposed to be Grandfather Mountain, but I didn't have enough time. More on that later.

By the time I was packed and ready to head out, it was about 10 AM. The Texas ADV guys were heading up the BRP too, so I hung out a few minutes more waiting for them.





We got underway about 10:30, but ran into trouble almost immediately. Leon (aka FocusFrenzy) sprung a coolant leak and headed back to Kickstand Lodge. Since I had a GPS, Jeff (aka TossingLead) and Dave (aka TWTourist) followed me to Cherokee. After gassing-up, Dave decided to head back to Kickstand Lodge to help Leon with repairs. Dave was heading to Virginia Beach, so we headed up the BRP.

Dave (aka TWTourist)



Jeff (aka TossingLead)



The Parkway offered spectacular views, but the tunnels sucked. I was wearing sunglasses, so I was damn-near blind going through them. All I could do was just aim for the middle of the road and pray a cyclist wasn't in there with me.

We made one stop mid-morning at the high point.





And stopped at Asheville for lunch. By this time, the three and a half days on the saddle were beginning to take their toll and my ass was pretty sore. Dave's GPS was telling him he was heading further away from his goal, so we said our goodbyes and he prepared to head east on I-40. I went in search of WalMart to buy an ATV seat cover and an air mattress. Almost an hour later I was back on the road, but not feeling better. I was glad for the seat length so I could move around, but I still couldn't get comfortable. I found myself making extra stops to get off the bike.

At the Craggy Gardens overlook, I met Damian from Argentina, who was touring on his BMW. Unfortunately, he had broken down, but some other riders had his rescue underway.



Views from the overlook.





Getting back on the bike, I only made it 50 miles to the Linville Falls Visitor Center before I had to stop again. Nature called and as I'm sitting there trying to figure out why I'm so sore, I look down and it finally hit me. It was my underwear. When I ride, I usually wear moisture-wiking compression shorts. On all my previous, single-day trips, I never had them on long enough to have a problem. But now, the seam of the shorts was creating wear marks and irritation. Not having anything else to change into, I just decided to go commando. What a difference. Within 30 minutes, all the pain was gone and I rode the remainder of the trip without any issues.

Maybe next time, Grandfather Mountain.



18 miles out, I see my goal for the evening, Stone Mountain State Park, North Carolina.



Another view from 9 miles out.



I got to the park around 8 PM and found out they close at 9. And they really do mean closed. They lock the gates and campers can't leave until 8 AM. I asked the guy at the campground check-in for a place to eat. He mentioned a general store just outside the park. Good enough.

The wood rats were out. The other day at Kickstand Lodge, I had mentioned to someone how improbable it was to hit a deer. "Like a bullet hitting a bullet," I said. Soon enough I would eat my words.



Stone Mountain General Store





I had a 5/8th of a large pizza and something called Cheerwine. Turns out it was a cherry cola, which I don't care for, but I drank it anyway.

Heading back to camp, I once again set up in the dark, but glad to have an air mattress. I chugged two Porters from a few nights ago, hoping it wouldn't have the same effect, took a shower, and went to bed.



298 miles for the day and 1228 miles for trip.

__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783

ArmyJoe screwed with this post 05-25-2014 at 07:10 AM
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2013, 02:14 PM   #47
Ricky Rocket
Adventurer
 
Ricky Rocket's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Lebanon, Connecticut -- Good 'ol US of A!
Oddometer: 52
Keep 'em coming...
__________________
This pleases me...
Ricky Rocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2013, 03:07 PM   #48
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky Rocket View Post
Keep 'em coming...
Two more days to go. I hope to have it done tomorrow.
__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2013, 09:17 AM   #49
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Day 5 (May 30th)

I woke at 7:30 AM with the hopes of hitting the road early since today would be my longest ride of the trip. Not bloody likely. After an extended trip to the bathroom (damn beer again) and packing, I was ready to head out around 8:30 AM.



Wanting a better photo of Stone Mountain, I rode around the park, but could not find a clear view. This annoyed the hell out of me because I had been here before and seem to recall parking right at the base of the slab. For those that have never heard of it, Stone Mountain is a popular rock climbing destination. It picked up the nickname, "Home of the Running Belay," because of its routes. With a lot of space between bolts, the belayer (person holding the rope) would sometimes have to run away from route to remove slack before the climber hits the gound. Oh, well. No photo and 30 minutes wasted.

Heading back up to the Parkway, I passed over the Eastern Continental Divide.



Not wanting to stop for pictures and not wanting to take anymore video (I already have 2.5 hours to go through), I set my GoPro to take pictures every 30 seconds. Here's a few of the interesting ones.

















Towards the end of the BRP, I took time to explore Fire Road 162, a well known jeep trail.



Before long I was at the end of the Parkway. Since there was no "leaving" sign, I bagged the "entering" sign at mile marker 0.



From there, I took I-64 to Staunton. Most people heading to West Virginia and Ohio know that US-250 is a great motorcycle route that snakes over the parallel hills of the Appalachians. Fewer would know that this is part of the Staunton and Parkersburg Turnpike, a road laid out in the first half of the 1800s to connect tidewater Virginia to the Ohio River valley. Fewer yet know that several sections of the Turnpike were bypassed by US routes and still exist today as gravel roads. My plan was to travel the original route from Staunton to Parkersburg. Finding the original route wasn't too horribly difficult. With street names like "Old Parkersburg Turnpike" and "Old Pike Road," it was easy to plan the route and find 26 miles of gravel.

The classic hill and valley topology of the central Appalachians.



At the VA-WV border, I got a two-fer.





Back out on the bypassed gravel, I found a Civil War-era Union camp. Given the strategic importance of the road, there would be several skirmishes along its length.



I also stopped at Travellers Repose, the first stage coach stop west of the mountains.





Leaving the Turnpike for now, I headed north on WV-28 for the Seneca Shadows campground.

The sun was quickly setting in my mirrors.



At 8:45 PM, the little bike that could turned 5. I marveled at how 40% of my total miles had been put on in the last five days.



Making the last push into Seneca, I was about 7 miles out when my luck ran out (or I got really lucky, depending on your point of view). I was riding along at about 50 MPH, when all of a sudden a deer jumped out at me from the right side and passed in front. I honestly don't think I even had time to react. Before I knew it, my bike was doing violent oscillations down the road. I knew it didn't hit it broadside, so I must have clipped her back legs. Soon enough, the bike settled down as a result of the gyroscopic force of the wheels and I kept it upright. As soon as I was able to, I turned around and went looking for it. I didn't see anything, so I turned around and went back north. On the way, I noticed I was having no physical reaction at all. No adrenaline dump, no fast breathing, nothing. What did this mean? Was it Army training or years of World of Warcraft that prepared me to deal with stressful situations?

Rolling into Seneca it got kind of spooky. There was a heavy fog and a lot of leaves and small twigs down. I would find out later an isolated thunderstorm cell had moved through the valley. I pulled into town about 9 PM only to find they rolled up the sidewalks at 8. I was lucky to find a few guys parking a school bus in the parking lot of a motel. I asked if they knew any places to eat and one of them gave me a gallon ziploc of crackers, chicken salad, and juice boxes. Oh, well. At least I wouldn't starve.

I headed over to the campground to find the attendant station empty. As I pulled out my iPhone to confirm my campsite, another motorcyclist pulled up next to me. He asked where I was camping and then led me to the spot. Turns out three kids from Richmond were camped there, so he led me to an open site next to his. We made our introductions. Patrick Hough was a Quality Specialist, junior hockey league (NAHL) scout, and racer. I pulled out my phone to call the wife and found I had no service. Pat immediately offered the use of his van so I could go down the road until I hit coverage. Awesome guy! I drove for six miles without finding a signal. Pulling into a business to turn around, I checked for a wifi signal on a whim. Lo and behold, they had an open network. I sent a text to my wife, but figured she'd not see it until morning, so I posted a message on Facebook asking friends to give her a call. Having done my due diligence, I turned around and went back to camp.

I set up my tent and then ran into Pat coming back from the camp with the three kids. Turns out he also bummed food from the same guys earlier, but he had hot dogs. We went back to their camp and cooked a few more hot dogs. Free food never tasted so good!

About midnight I said my goodbyes and went to sleep.

390 miles for the day (new record) and 1618 for the trip.

__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783

ArmyJoe screwed with this post 05-26-2014 at 01:13 PM
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2013, 04:48 PM   #50
Drifter136
Lab Rat
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Pataskala, Ohio
Oddometer: 71
The "Nooooooooooooooo" pic is great!
Drifter136 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2013, 05:15 PM   #51
steveb126
Adventurer Anonymous
 
steveb126's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Wooster,OH
Oddometer: 997
Really dig the gopro stop action pics. Very well done ArmyJoe !
__________________
I may not be much, but I'm all I think about.
Wee & Wingabago Wanderings
steveb126 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2013, 06:36 PM   #52
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Day 6 (May 31st)

Getting up at 8:30 AM, I packed up and thanked Pat for his hospitality.

My tent



Tent with rainfly removed to show air mattress and mummy bag.



Pat was camera shy, but here's his CBR929RR





Heading into Seneca Rocks, I stopped by Harper's Old Country Store. Catering to campers and rock jocks, this place has just about everything.



Next door is The Gendarme Climbing Shop and Seneca Rocks Climbing School. My wife and I were students at the school about 18 years ago. She and I summited Seneca Rocks twice, once with an instructor from the school and once by ourselves.



Seneca Rocks, rising 900 feet off the valley floor, is the highest point east of the Mississippi that can only be reached by climbing.



From there, I headed 48 miles down WV-28 to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank.



Since my Army job involves satellite communications, I have a thing for large parabolic antennas. The Green Bank Telescope (on the left) is 100 meters (328 feet) in diameter. I'd love to get a closer view.



Heading back up WV-28, I continued where I left off on the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike. After nine miles of pavement, it was time to hit some gravel and explore Cheat Summit Fort.





Coming back down, I found some puddles and the 100-year old Cheat bridge.



Back on asphalt, I got to Beverly, West Virginia and stopped at the local visitor center. This building served as the Union headquarters for most of the Civil War.



Inside, I asked for information about bypassed portions of the Turnpike, but they weren't able to tell me anything I didn't already know. On the way out, I asked for a recommendation for somewhere to eat. I was told that Mama's Kitchen was a mile down the road on the right.



Finally, someone hit one out of the park. This place rocked! I had the special: beans, home fries, ham, and cornbread. It was delicious and more than I could eat. I'll definitely stop here again.



Heading due west, I left the US-250 and took the original route over the hill. At the top, half way through a 4-mile gravel road, I found a marker for the Battle of Rich Mountain.



Coming down off the hill, it was back onto the paved portion of the bypassed route, heading for Buckhannon, West Virginia. That's when the shit hit the fan. Here's the report I sent to my Commander:

Quote:
At 1409 on 31 May 2013, I was riding a motorcycle west on Old Elkins Road (aka, Buckhannon Pike) in West Virginia, on the last leg of a 6-day, 2000-mile solo trip. As I entered the unincorporated community of Ellamore, I came upon a wrecked motorcycle in the middle of the road (Google Maps address of 10754 Old Elkins Road, Buckhannon, WV). No EMS was present, so I pulled over to survey the scene.

On the right side of the road, a distraught woman was on the phone, standing next to a pickup truck. On the left side of the road, the rider was sitting upright in the east-bound lane, but his right leg was at an odd angle that indicated a fracture. I parked my motorcycle and went to offer assistance. As soon I started to approach and ask if he needed help, I heard him say, "She ripped my leg off." I immediately saw that he had a very large pool of blood under his leg and he was attempting to stem the flow using a belt as a tourniquet just above his knee. He moved slightly and it was obvious his tibia and fibula were shattered and very little was holding his leg together.

I told him I had an Army-issued tourniquet and asked if he wanted me to apply it. He said yes, so I went back to get my Improved First Aid Kit (IFAK) from my saddlebag. Not knowing the extent of his injuries and not wanting to cause further harm, I placed my tourniquet directly above his. After it was on, other bystanders and I helped him to lie down on his back (treat for shock) and continued to talk to him to reassure him and to monitor his consciousness. During our conversation, I learned his name was Thomas Morris, that he was a Platoon Sergeant in Vietnam, and that he had been awarded the Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device.

EMS was still not on-scene by 1416 and a crowd was forming. I took a moment to clear the immediate area of crash debris and called 911 to get an update. The operator told me ambulances were being dispatched from Buckhannon (11 miles west) and Elkins (17 miles east). I informed her of the extent of the injury and told her I applied a tourniquet. She asked for my name and told me EMS would be there shortly.

After another five minutes, the first ambulance arrived. I introduced myself, pointed out the tourniquet, and told them it had been on about 10 minutes. I was asked to support the patient’s head and neck as they cut off his boot, sock, and pants leg to examine his injury. Soon after, they applied a neck brace and I helped roll him onto a backboard. He was then loaded into the ambulance and I was told he would be flown by helicopter to Morgantown, 50 miles to the north.

By that point, the patient’s son had arrived. I introduced myself, described what happened, and asked for his contact information. I then went to the remaining EMS and police on-site and asked if they needed me for anything. They did not, so I got on my motorcycle and departed the scene at 1545.

I called the patient’s wife on 1 June 2013 for an update. She told me that he had surgery to pin the leg back together and that he was expected to be in the hospital for at least 4 days. From her description, they are planning for a full recovery.
Oh. My. God. I have never seen so much blood. The puddle under his leg actually had height. I can't say that I saved his life, but without the tourniquet, I was afraid he was going to bleed out. I called his wife a hour ago and she confirmed he'll be in the hospital through the weekend, but today they had him out of bed and sitting in a chair.

I took some pictures, but out of respect for Tom, he does not appear in them. Out of respect for those that are squeamish, you'll need to click the photos to see them.

EMS loads him into the ambulance

http://joha.smugmug.com/photos/i-jBv...-jBvjn5B-L.jpg

From the damage to the red truck, it looked like he clipped the front end as she was turning in the opposite direction and crushed his leg between the bike and her bumper.

http://joha.smugmug.com/photos/i-4Qn...-4Qnj5gg-L.jpg

Lots of blood.

http://joha.smugmug.com/photos/i-DCw...-DCw4B46-L.jpg

This is the pool that collected under his leg. Best guess is that's 18-24 inches long and 12 inches wide.

http://joha.smugmug.com/photos/i-PMj...-PMjMMJc-L.jpg

His boot and sock were cut off by EMS.

http://joha.smugmug.com/photos/i-qLB...-qLBtSXz-L.jpg

According to the local TV station, "the driver of the truck was cited for failure to yield to the right of way."

Whew...

Now a few hours behind schedule, I got back on the road and only stopped to take a few more pictures.

The Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum in Weston, one of the largest hand-cut stone masonry building in the US.



Floodwall at Point Park in Parkersburg.



The Parkersburg-Belpre Bridge and my first sight of Ohio



I stopped by Ohio's smallest church (seats 8) to say a small prayer for Tom.



From there, I headed up the entire length of OH-555, aka Triple Nickel. With lots of twisties and rolling hills, some think this is one of Ohio's best roads. But the spot patching and potential for gravel in the turns gets a thumbs down from a lot of riders. I enjoyed it all the same. It was really cool to wave to the Amish (and have them wave back) as they were working in their gardens and fields.





Just as I got to Zanesville at the end of 555, I saw a familiar sight. Anyone that's spent time in the Midwest has seen the evening thunderstorms that roll in.



Checking my weather radar app, I saw I had little time to find cover.



I hauled ass to the nearest McDonalds for dinner and wifi. The rain stopped after an hour and I got back on the road. By now it was about 9:30 PM. The last bit of historic road was National Road, the first improved highway to be built by the federal government, and the straightest damn road in Ohio. Unfortunately, it was too dark to take pictures, so you'll have to settle for a file photo.



Taking a quick detour through downtown Columbus, I took a picture with the city skyline.



From there, it was a short ride home. Pulling in at 11:30 PM, I had 384 miles for the day and 2002 miles for the trip.


 
Mission complete.

ArmyJoe screwed with this post 05-26-2014 at 01:52 PM
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 03:58 AM   #53
FireDog45
Mid-life crisis sufferer
 
FireDog45's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Central, Ohio
Oddometer: 653
Hey Joe (where you going...) Sorry, but I hear those words and I can't help hearing Hendrix!

Anyway, nice ride and nice job helping out that rider!

A question and a comment:

What camping gear were you using and what would you change? Assuming you would change anything.

Took a ride to Skyline Dr and The BRP with Swingset last year and we ended up at Rich Mt. I got some strange looks while up on the pegs of my ST1100 going up that road . I spent a little while climbing around those rocks trying to find some of the Confederate memorials but couldn't find any.
FireDog45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 06:49 AM   #54
MeefZah
Curmudgeonly
 
MeefZah's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2003
Location: New Philadelphia, Ohio
Oddometer: 10,463
Just read the whole report, Joe, looks good.

Did you submit that report to your CO because you used Army property (IFAK) or?
__________________
"A man turns his back on the comforts of home, and when the dust all settles and the story is told, history is made by the side of the road..." - DBT

My Smugmug Galleries
MeefZah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 07:15 AM   #55
dickensheets
smprparatus
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Oddometer: 218
Good read. Thanks. I like the bike.


But is the max speed 81mph no matter what?
dickensheets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:20 AM   #56
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Quote:
Originally Posted by FireDog45 View Post
What camping gear were you using and what would you change? Assuming you would change anything.
I have an REI "three person" backpacking tent, which really means two people and gear. I didn't need that much space, but it was nice to spread out. The poles were too long for my bags, so you can see them in the rear of the milk crate. I could probably get by with something smaller, but I'm frugal and won't spend the money on a replacement.

My sleeping bag is part if my issued 3-layer sleep system. I just stuffed the lightest layer into a sack and left the rest at home.

The air mattress was a slim, cot-width unit. Worked perfectly, but almost rolled off it a time or two.
__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:27 AM   #57
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeefZah View Post
Just read the whole report, Joe, looks good.

Did you submit that report to your CO because you used Army property (IFAK) or?
The primary reason was because Commanders have CCIRs, Commander's Critical Information Requirements. One of ours is if a Soldier is in the news. Since this had potential, I thought it best to play it safe. Commanders don't like surprises.

The secondary reason was to document the field loss of the tourniquet. I'm hoping my supply sergeant can hook me up with a replacement and not make me pay for it.
__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:29 AM   #58
ArmyJoe OP
Beastly Adventurer
 
ArmyJoe's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Oddometer: 1,095
Quote:
Originally Posted by dickensheets View Post
But is the max speed 81mph no matter what?
That was my max speed on the first day and I didn't reset the GPS trip data or exceed that speed.
__________________
2009 Can-Am Spyder RS, 2008 Yamaha WR250R

My latest adventures detailed at ArmyJoe's Perpetual Picture Thread:
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888783

ArmyJoe screwed with this post 11-11-2013 at 11:17 AM
ArmyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2013, 12:02 AM   #59
b1pig
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Location: Ray City, Ga
Oddometer: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArmyJoe View Post
The primary reason was because Commanders have CCIRs, Commander's Critical Information Requirements. One of ours is if a Soldier is in the news. Since this had potential, I thought it best to play it safe. Commanders don't like surprises.

The secondary reason was to document the field loss of the tourniquet. I'm hoping my supply sergeant can hook me up with a replacement and not make me pay for it.
True. I forgot about that little detail. I was in the Army from Aug92 to Feb98. Always got the private briefing from the First Sergeant before taking an extended leave.

Thanks for stopping and helping out. You are certainly right. Had the tourniquet not been applied properly, the outcome may have been different. I know that the current business of the military has put higher demand on recurrent training for "buddy aid". Judging by what I read, great job. I'd call it a significant contribution with the proper application of that tourniquet.

If you catch shit from supply, I'll gladly pay for it myself. Let me know the NSN and I can probably source several for you... I know a few airmen here at my local military installation that would help a brother out.

Thanks for sharing the ride with those of us that are home/work bound.

Stay safe.
Stay Alert.
Hooah!

(stay away from that porter)
b1pig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2013, 04:01 PM   #60
TossingLead
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Oddometer: 50
Great Ride Report
Good to meet you, hope we can Ride together again.
TossingLead is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014