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Old 06-21-2013, 12:06 PM   #16
RobbieAG
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Unless you're really good at tuning bikes, have the equipment and lots of time, I wouldn't mess with it. It's way too much money to sink into that bike - you'll never get your money out of it. It will actually decrease the value of the bike because it's not stock. I would sell the bike, take that money plus the money for the kit and get something that's set up the way you really want.
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Old 06-21-2013, 03:02 PM   #17
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I would even accept some loss of performance on a cruiser for the simplicity of a single carb. You think adjusting the valves on a V-Star 650 is bad, it can't be any worse than doing it on a Ninja 250 or Ninja 500. You have to practically disassemble the entire bike to get the cam cover off. And despite these being twins, they still have 8 valves, and a couple of them are almost impossible to get to because the frame is in the way. A 16 valve sport bike is far worse, and some, like the Honda VFR VTEC setup are such a nightmare they take 6 hours for a dealer to do. That's almost $700 in labor, shop supplies, and taxes to have the valves done. On the Yamaha Majesty scooter, the entire engine and drivetrain have to come out, and to get that out, all the bodywork must be removed.


One of my most important criteria for buying a bike is the maintenance. It takes about 3 hours to do the valves on a Honda PCX150, and it is supposed to be done every 2500 miles. Before actually buying a bike, I make sure tha maintenance is withing reason. If not, I don't buy it, no matter how much I might want it.
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Old 06-21-2013, 05:53 PM   #18
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I'm interested in converting my GL1000 4 carbs into 1:



Not a bad deal if you don't have to sync the 4 carbs anymore.

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Old 06-21-2013, 06:32 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I would even accept some loss of performance on a cruiser for the simplicity of a single carb. You think adjusting the valves on a V-Star 650 is bad, it can't be any worse than doing it on a Ninja 250 or Ninja 500. You have to practically disassemble the entire bike to get the cam cover off. And despite these being twins, they still have 8 valves, and a couple of them are almost impossible to get to because the frame is in the way. A 16 valve sport bike is far worse, and some, like the Honda VFR VTEC setup are such a nightmare they take 6 hours for a dealer to do. That's almost $700 in labor, shop supplies, and taxes to have the valves done. On the Yamaha Majesty scooter, the entire engine and drivetrain have to come out, and to get that out, all the bodywork must be removed.


One of my most important criteria for buying a bike is the maintenance. It takes about 3 hours to do the valves on a Honda PCX150, and it is supposed to be done every 2500 miles. Before actually buying a bike, I make sure tha maintenance is withing reason. If not, I don't buy it, no matter how much I might want it.
I'm surprised you are not riding an airhead BMW then. Don't know if maintenance can get any simpler than that
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:23 PM   #20
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and some, like the Honda VFR VTEC setup are such a nightmare they take 6 hours for a dealer to do. That's almost $700 in labor, shop supplies, and taxes to have the valves done.

One of my most important criteria for buying a bike is the maintenance.
That's one thing great about the Nighthawk and other bikes with hydraulic lifters - no valve adjustments. I've been tempted to buy a VFR numerous times but then think about the maintenance and back off. Even though the Nighthawk has four carbs, checking the sync once every 8k miles is no big deal once you've done it.
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Old 06-21-2013, 08:30 PM   #21
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Short term maintenance on my Vulcan 750 consists of changing the oil and checking the tire pressures. Spin in filter. Hydraulic lifters so no valve adjustments. Spark plugs and air filters every 20,000 miles or so. Coolant change every 2 years. That should be about it. But then there's the final drive. Very poor design by Kawasaki. You have to tear the whole rear end out of the bike to lube the splines every 10,000 miles. Rear wheel, gearcase, swingarm, shocks, brake parts, and complete exhaust have to come off. Taking your time it's a 2 day job. I wouldn't mind so much if it was every 20,000 miles, I'd just do it when I replaced the tires. But you have to do it twice as often as replacing the tires, or the splines will chew themselves up, requiring a new final drive unit and drive shaft, about $1500. I did not know about this with my first Vulcan 750, but I liked it so much that I bought the '02 knowing what I was in store for. One of the first things I did when I got it home from the dealer was to tear it apart and do the splines. Sure enough they were bone dry on a brand new bike.

These bikes were made unchanged for 22 years. The most likely reason there are not that many of them still around is that most owners never knew about this issue, destroyed their drive splines and gearcase, and sold or parted the bike out rather than spend the money to fix it. They also had issues with the automatic cam chain tensioners, but a set of manual tensioners at around 15,000 miles fixed that problem permanently.
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Old 06-21-2013, 09:38 PM   #22
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Back on subject. I don't know why reducing the number of carbs from two to one would increase power. In the old (old!) days Triumph offered a single carb Tiger versus a twin Carb Bonneville. The idea was greater simplicity in an era when carbs went out of tune easily (Amals did anyway) and lower purchase price. Greater power went to the two carb Bonneville. Perhaps there is some other reason why 700 dollars buys a paltry extra few horsepower. $700 could easily buy you a whole motorcycle if you aren't too fussy. Gioven your financial situation look elsewhere for simplicity and ease of maintenance. (HD does low maintenance if you can trade in for a lightly used one).
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Old 06-22-2013, 12:58 AM   #23
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I think you get more peak HP with two carbs, but better low end and torque with a single. I'd rather have a better low end myself on a twin.
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Old 06-22-2013, 07:18 AM   #24
JerryH
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You will not likely get more power at all by using a single carb on a multi cylinder engine, but you should get more torque. But the big issue is simplicity. The simpler something is, assuming it still works, the better it is.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:02 AM   #25
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Thanks for all the replies

After much consideration, the simplicity and possible gains would be nice, but I've come to the conclusion that they're not worth $700. I think I'll save that up for other things.

Thanks again
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:24 AM   #26
JerryH
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It looks like the valve adjustment on the V-Star 650 is fairly straightforward, just a lot of work removing and replacing things to get to them.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:49 AM   #27
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I guess I hadn't heard a single carb giving more performance than two unless the two are not tuned properly.
I thought this bike was meant as low-cost transportation? I have trouble spending that kind of money on the FCR's for my SV race-bike.
Speaking of the SV; I only paid $1300 for it to start with, save your money and put it toward another bike.
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Old 06-22-2013, 11:04 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
It looks like the valve adjustment on the V-Star 650 is fairly straightforward, just a lot of work removing and replacing things to get to them.
Exactly. There's a lot of stuff that has to be removed and replaced The single carb setup would eliminate the need to remove the carbs and all to gain access.

Quote:
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I guess I hadn't heard a single carb giving more performance than two unless the two are not tuned properly.
I thought this bike was meant as low-cost transportation? I have trouble spending that kind of money on the FCR's for my SV race-bike.
Speaking of the SV; I only paid $1300 for it to start with, save your money and put it toward another bike.
It's low cost transportation to a degree - I also have a Chevy HHR that I can't wait to sell once it's paid off in a year or so. I need a car to get my 10 month old daughter to different places. I only paid $1400 for the V-Star to start with, but I really like it and wouldn't mind spending some money to make it easier to work on etc.
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Old 06-22-2013, 12:43 PM   #29
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I only paid $1400 for the V-Star to start with, but I really like it and wouldn't mind spending some money to make it easier to work on etc.
I'd just ride it like it is, after jetting of course.
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:52 PM   #30
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Since you are asking ...

700 is too much to spend on that bike unless you are doing multiple farkles that you MIGHT get a little back on - like backrest / shield / boards / etc... Even then, probably not. Ride cause you like it. Soon, you will be in another bike based on the experience of most with their first bike. IMO
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