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Old 07-15-2013, 07:38 PM   #1
stathill OP
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Google Earth Just Got A Whole Lot Better - For Queenslanders

If you're a Queenslander (either permanent or just contemplating a visit) and into Google Earth to plan trips etc. and wondered whether the track you're following will stray onto private property, or whether that campsite on the river is on a reserve or the imagery at the particular place is fairly old or grainy well here's something that may assist.

Its a new product developed by the Qld Dept. of Natural Resources & Mines. Basically its a layer of information that can be toggled on & off your normal Google Earth base layer. The info that is provided is all the cadastral (property) boundaries and the most recent aerial photography over Qld. It also gives property info such as tenure, area etc. You can also search addresses, lot/plans etc.

It is pretty good.

Check it herehttp://www.nrm.qld.gov.au/mapping/queensland-globe.html

Can also be put onto ipads, phones (apple & android) etc.

Here's a tip -when it first starts up, there's an info banner that appears. In there is a link to tips & tricks - worth reading.

Sorry for the rest of Australia......
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Old 07-15-2013, 09:11 PM   #2
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Is there more to Australia than just Queensland

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Old 07-15-2013, 09:59 PM   #3
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Have used this for while now. Just be mindful of what you ask for and what is received. Some of the data is, shall we say not as accurate as it could be. Cadastral data comes from local councils. There are some roads that don't exist or are mark for possible future construction. Still fun to investigate though.
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Old 07-16-2013, 03:47 AM   #4
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Thanks for posting, the maps are much better
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:57 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Chop Chop View Post
Have used this for while now. Just be mindful of what you ask for and what is received. Some of the data is, shall we say not as accurate as it could be. Cadastral data comes from local councils. There are some roads that don't exist or are mark for possible future construction. Still fun to investigate though.

Actually the data is pretty accurate, in fact it is very accurate. The data is from the Digital Cadastral Database which is maintained by the department (not the councils) and is a digital representaion of survey plans submitted by surveyors in the course of their work throughout the ages until the present. In some places it may not match up to the google imagery due to distortion of the imagery.

Re the roads that don't exist - the 'roads' shown are surveyed roads, there is no suggestion they are formed or not. But that's the beauty of having the cadastral boundaries over google. You can see (in most areas) whether the road you intend to follow is on or close to the surveyed alignment and you'll know if you're likely to be shot at or not for trespassing .
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Old 07-16-2013, 11:24 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by stathill View Post
Actually the data is pretty accurate, in fact it is very accurate. The data is from the Digital Cadastral Database which is maintained by the department (not the councils) and is a digital representaion of survey plans submitted by surveyors in the course of their work throughout the ages until the present. In some places it may not match up to the google imagery due to distortion of the imagery.

Re the roads that don't exist - the 'roads' shown are surveyed roads, there is no suggestion they are formed or not. But that's the beauty of having the cadastral boundaries over google. You can see (in most areas) whether the road you intend to follow is on or close to the surveyed alignment and you'll know if you're likely to be shot at or not for trespassing .
So I'm new to the whole GPS mapping thing etc, but which of the layers do I turn on so I can see whether or not a track goes in private property?

At the moment I've clicked the 'property' icon which puts yellow lines everywhere, designating boundaries I guess. Is this what I'm meant to be using?

Cheers,

John
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Old 07-17-2013, 01:37 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Captain115 View Post
So I'm new to the whole GPS mapping thing etc, but which of the layers do I turn on so I can see whether or not a track goes in private property?

At the moment I've clicked the 'property' icon which puts yellow lines everywhere, designating boundaries I guess. Is this what I'm meant to be using?

Cheers,

John
Yes John the yellow lines are property boundaries. The surveyed roads are the narrow (generally) parallel lines. Check on the imagery for the track or road you want to follow and if it sticks to the surveyed alignment then you're right. This is fairly general advice and not gospel of course as there are always variables such as road closures, locked gates that may or may not be legal etc., but it's a help in planning a ride.
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:29 AM   #8
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How do I find out

so how do I find out what version I have ? I'm sure I found it last nigh when I first read this thread and I though I was ok , but when I go into layers then primary database all I can get is borders & labels and places . This sounds a good thing as I'm getting a bit stuck ATM will a ride around Kipper rd to sugarloaf rd lake Cessbrook to Sebestapool rd
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:36 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by stathill View Post
Actually the data is pretty accurate, in fact it is very accurate. The data is from the Digital Cadastral Database which is maintained by the department (not the councils) and is a digital representaion of survey plans submitted by surveyors in the course of their work throughout the ages until the present. In some places it may not match up to the google imagery due to distortion of the imagery.

Re the roads that don't exist - the 'roads' shown are surveyed roads, there is no suggestion they are formed or not. But that's the beauty of having the cadastral boundaries over google. You can see (in most areas) whether the road you intend to follow is on or close to the surveyed alignment and you'll know if you're likely to be shot at or not for trespassing .
Yep, but bear in mind that older surveys can have massive errors, and the old plans can be interpreted incorrectly. The DCDB is limited in accuracy, particularly in rural areas - which is where we like to ride. Combine this inaccuracy with imagery errors caused by things such as distortion in the image and what you see may bear only a passing resemblance to the actual boundary location. Bear in mind also that the imagery is fitted under the cadastral linework on a "best fit, looks right" basis. If a fenceline does not show clearly on the image, or if the fence is not on the boundary, the fit of the image may be metres out.

Oh, and a farmer doesn't want to hear that "Google shows a road here" when he pulls you up riding in his property!

I'm a surveyor, do this stuff for a living. Just be careful using Google maps or any equivalent when route planning.
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:45 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by stathill View Post
Yes John the yellow lines are property boundaries. The surveyed roads are the narrow (generally) parallel lines. Check on the imagery for the track or road you want to follow and if it sticks to the surveyed alignment then you're right. This is fairly general advice and not gospel of course as there are always variables such as road closures, locked gates that may or may not be legal etc., but it's a help in planning a ride.
Cheers mate, I'll play around with it a bit more now you've confirmed that.

John
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Old 07-17-2013, 05:47 AM   #11
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Is there more to Australia than just Queensland

Sent from my phone while swerving over the road in my car
nope..

only 2 states to be in.. qld or pissed
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Old 07-18-2013, 07:34 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by ECKS-Man View Post
Yep, but bear in mind that older surveys can have massive errors, and the old plans can be interpreted incorrectly. The DCDB is limited in accuracy, particularly in rural areas - which is where we like to ride. Combine this inaccuracy with imagery errors caused by things such as distortion in the image and what you see may bear only a passing resemblance to the actual boundary location. Bear in mind also that the imagery is fitted under the cadastral linework on a "best fit, looks right" basis. If a fenceline does not show clearly on the image, or if the fence is not on the boundary, the fit of the image may be metres out.

Oh, and a farmer doesn't want to hear that "Google shows a road here" when he pulls you up riding in his property!

I'm a surveyor, do this stuff for a living. Just be careful using Google maps or any equivalent when route planning.

We live in the hinterland - our "street" only goes to 2 houses - first our neighbour and then us. The street sign at the turnoff says "no through road" and there is a second sign further along that makes it clear that this is a "no through road". The council allowed a temporary road closure on the section of road that continues as bush past our place and has a gate at both ends. The only place to turn around is actually literally in our back yard.

I am amazed at the number of people who rock up in our yard using the piss poor excuse that they were just reading the Iphone/GPS instructions. I try and be polite and suggest a quick read of the road signs would be helpful.

I hope that I pay similar attention when riding in unfamiliar areas.

Cheers
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:31 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by ECKS-Man View Post
Yep, but bear in mind that older surveys can have massive errors, and the old plans can be interpreted incorrectly. The DCDB is limited in accuracy, particularly in rural areas - which is where we like to ride. Combine this inaccuracy with imagery errors caused by things such as distortion in the image and what you see may bear only a passing resemblance to the actual boundary location. Bear in mind also that the imagery is fitted under the cadastral linework on a "best fit, looks right" basis. If a fenceline does not show clearly on the image, or if the fence is not on the boundary, the fit of the image may be metres out.

Oh, and a farmer doesn't want to hear that "Google shows a road here" when he pulls you up riding in his property!

I'm a surveyor, do this stuff for a living. Just be careful using Google maps or any equivalent when route planning.

Yep this is true!

DCDB in NSW can only described as dogs balls

add the recent buy back of old road leases and all sorts of things and its difficult to get it right. and remapping things in this day and age is EXPENSIVE......


everyone thinks that you can do everything with an eye in the sky and just model it.

it just aint true folks!
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Old 07-20-2013, 05:07 AM   #14
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Yeah - its amazing how everyone who now has a GPS and Google Earth is a mapping and surveying expert.....
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Old 07-21-2013, 05:49 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by stathill View Post
Actually the data is pretty accurate, in fact it is very accurate. The data is from the Digital Cadastral Database which is maintained by the department (not the councils) and is a digital representaion of survey plans submitted by surveyors in the course of their work throughout the ages until the present. In some places it may not match up to the google imagery due to distortion of the imagery.

Re the roads that don't exist - the 'roads' shown are surveyed roads, there is no suggestion they are formed or not. But that's the beauty of having the cadastral boundaries over google. You can see (in most areas) whether the road you intend to follow is on or close to the surveyed alignment and you'll know if you're likely to be shot at or not for trespassing .
Perhaps I should of clarified. The database is maintained by the state govt. There is an agreement between councils and state government (though not all councils) where the councils supply a lot of the information that makes up the database. This has resulted in more accurate information. Nothing is perfect though, hence the comment about being careful what you ask for. Probably should of said knowing how to interpret the information. Either way still good fun to use.
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