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Old 08-07-2013, 11:02 AM   #91
Jan from Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joexr View Post
In the 1980 USGP at Carlsbad , Danny Chandler ran the only-stroke in the open class. Always wondered what it was. I thought it was a Honda though. Was the HL motor a one off or is it a modified TT500 motor?
Original race bikes used highly modified XT500 engines. Yamaha made 400 factory replicas for sale and they used stock XT500 engines. More history at http://www.pulpmx.com/stories/look-b...el-1979-hl-500.
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Jan from Finland screwed with this post 08-07-2013 at 11:11 AM
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Old 08-07-2013, 04:58 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by Jan from Finland View Post
Original race bikes used highly modified XT500 engines. Yamaha made 400 factory replicas for sale and they used stock XT500 engines. More history at http://www.pulpmx.com/stories/look-b...el-1979-hl-500.
Cool website for classic MX stuff. Thanks.
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Old 08-07-2013, 07:29 PM   #93
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Honda 750 Four (the grand daddy of mass production superbikes)
Kawasaki GPz1100 (the grand daddy of the mass production sportbikes)
Kawasaki 500/750 Triple (the grand daddy of "hold my beer" speed/power category)
Honda Goldwing + GL1800 (the grand daddy, the bloodline, and the reigning king of ultimate touring bike class)
BMW "R" series motorcycles (the grand-daddies of functional motorcycles for the masses)
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:24 AM   #94
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Originally Posted by Andyvh1959 View Post
I'd say at the top of the list for all, is the 69 Honda CB750. Because it changed SO many facets of motorcycling:
High performance
Reasonable cost
Reliability
Serviceability
Adaptability
Features (disc brakes, electric starting, etc).

But I feel it is the bike, because it brought all these aspects together in a package SO many riders could afford, modify and really enjoy.
This is why it should be #1 on the list

1969 - Imagine coming back from a run and not having to tighten bolts, or maybe go back and look for that muffler that vibrated off.
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:56 AM   #95
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BMW "R" series motorcycles (the grand-daddies of functional motorcycles for the masses)
You realize there are a bunch of other motorcycles that were sold in much higher quantities than any R-bike ever was, don't you?
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Old 08-08-2013, 06:53 AM   #96
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Originally Posted by rocker59 View Post
You realize there are a bunch of other motorcycles that were sold in much higher quantities than any R-bike ever was, don't you?
Yup - I do. My reasons for the nomination are:
- solid reliability
- easy to maintain/shaft drive
- good ergos
- "configurability"
- good performance/handling

ergo --> they are preverbal ridable mile eating anvils.

There may be other brands that sold in higher quantities, but I bet the aggregate R-bike miles are higher - both from a individual bike as well as total across the group. Hence my nomination in the "functional" category. 15 year old R-bikes can respectfully be discussed as "low miles" if they have < 100k miles...
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Old 08-08-2013, 08:15 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by wario View Post
Honda 750 Four (the grand daddy of mass production superbikes)
Kawasaki GPz1100 (the grand daddy of the mass production sportbikes)
Kawasaki 500/750 Triple (the grand daddy of "hold my beer" speed/power category)
Honda Goldwing + GL1800 (the grand daddy, the bloodline, and the reigning king of ultimate touring bike class)
BMW "R" series motorcycles (the grand-daddies of functional motorcycles for the masses)
I agree with a lot of this but this may be the first time I've ever seen someone refer to a BMW motorcycle as being "for the masses." If I were going to pick a motorcycle for most significance in the category of functional motorcycle for the masses, it would have to be the Honda Super Cub, no question.
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Old 08-09-2013, 09:51 AM   #98
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- 1 for the KLR. IMHO, nothing should be considered great because it doesn't do anything well - certainly on the same list for "most significant of all time"
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MX stuff isn't my cup of tea, but falling down the side of a mountain is

eatpasta screwed with this post 08-09-2013 at 10:02 AM
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Old 08-09-2013, 03:30 PM   #99
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- 1 for the KLR. IMHO, nothing should be considered great because it doesn't do anything well - certainly on the same list for "most significant of all time"
klr probalby doesn't belong on the list, however I disagree with your statement. a KLR does everything good to well and nothing great. few other bikes are as versatile and as affordable.
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Old 08-09-2013, 05:25 PM   #100
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klr probalby doesn't belong on the list, however I disagree with your statement. a KLR does everything good to well and nothing great. few other bikes are as versatile and as affordable.
I will agree with you that few bikes are as versatile..... heh.... that's about it. We could go around in circles for weeks about this and neither one of us would be more correct I think.
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Quote:
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MX stuff isn't my cup of tea, but falling down the side of a mountain is
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Old 08-09-2013, 06:19 PM   #101
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Tz 750

Yamaha TZ 750, any bike that is too much bike for King Kenny has to be on the list.
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Old 08-10-2013, 06:56 AM   #102
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Gee, all these bikes listed and not a single vote for one of the most significant bikes, the Velocette KTT series?

KTT MK I - positive stop foot change gearbox and an engine with high RPM, narrow power band. Basically the prototype for all modern motorcycles.

KTT MK VIII - just to have to include this one, one of the best looking race bikes ever, swing arm suspension that actually worked, magnesium bits on the factory bikes, gas charged shocks (on the factory bikes), and very successful on track. All this in the late 1930's! This bike was even raced postwar with some success.
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:04 AM   #103
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The first Vespa.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:23 AM   #104
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Yamaha TZ 750, any bike that is too much bike for King Kenny has to be on the list.
He thought the TZ750 flat-tracker was too much [ on dirt ] , not the roadracer. The 80s 500s were faster. The most recent 500s were 200 HP.
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:49 PM   #105
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My definition of "significant" (which the OP left open to interpretation, so I think for most folks it's just another version of "favorite, "best", etc.) is the fundamental impact it had on the industry. I don't know enough about real old bikes that pioneered some technology first, but let's say there are 6 of them, whatever they were, up through the 1965 or so. For the remaining 6 I'd chose:

1) 1967 Yamaha DT1- for making the genre broad base affordable and reliable
2) 1969 Honda CB750- for all the known reasons
3) 1972 H-D Superglide- something has to function as the seminal cruiser: after all, they are 50% of the US market. So I'd nominate this because it's considered the first factory custom.
4) 1980 Honda Gold Wing GL1100- first Japanese/mass market bike outfitted as a touring bike from the factory that demonstrated that "touring bikes" could be their own market segment (case could be made for the original 1974 GL1000)
5) 1980 Ducati Pantah 500SL- Without this bike (specifically the engine design) there would be no Ducati as we know it today. And nothing for the rest to catch up to.
6) 1985 Suzuki GSX-R750, a reset on sport biking that has been the design model ever since.


Honorary mention to early Yamaha production racers (RD/TZs from 250-750)-- quantities of quality race bikes for the masses certainly had an impact.

In reviewing this list I'm really struck that they're all "old" bikes. There's probably a few new bikes I'm not thinking of, but I'm really struggling to think of ones that aren't some variation or logical extension of the 6 I named.
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