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Old 08-16-2013, 04:47 PM   #31
dirtrulz
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I ride two up all the time and dont feel it is responsible to ride faster and risk hurting them just because I think I should be able to go faster. If anything I am way more cautious with a passenger. If I hurt myself that is my fault, but if I hurt my wife because I did something foolish then it would be hard to forgive myself. Unless there is a life or death reason to have to go faster what is the big deal.

If your passenger does one wrong think in a gravel corner and you are running on the edge then there is a good chance you are going to go down hard.
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Old 08-17-2013, 06:06 AM   #32
corndog67
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Tires? I see people on here blame their tires all the time. Wrong tread pattern made me crash. Wrong compound was why I couldn't make it up that hill. It was too narrow for the conditions. I looked at the manufacturers date code and they were old, that's why I crashed. The knobs were too big. The knobs were too small.

Its all bullshit, and its all just excuses. Its the rider. You're riding the bike. Its up to you to make it work. Quit blaming the tires, its you.
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Old 08-19-2013, 12:40 PM   #33
bigdon
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Slow down coming into the corner and power out. I'm not saying to brake the rear end loose but applying even a little power will make the bike turn better.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:07 PM   #34
Aj Mick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fixie View Post
Im not aiming to be a hooligan when I my trusty pillion is along for the ride, Id just like to be able to corner a bit faster. On many corners I'm at 15mph or below! Sure, this is appropriate for many situations, but I think I should be able to take many of these corners a bit faster since I could double my speed if I were solo.

So, how can I improve? What should I experiment with?
Just doing it will build your experience.... it will beat any suggestions you get from an Internet forum.

But what's the hurry.....? Just get used to taking it easy on gravel roads when you have a pillion. Keep the fancy go faster tricks for when you are riding solo, and only have your own comfort and safety to consider.
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Old 08-22-2013, 10:20 PM   #35
Bill 310
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Originally Posted by Full Power View Post
Try a set of TKC80, maybe 24 or 25 PSI front, not much more in back. Then take a quick ride up to Deadhorse,AK
I ran 28 Front/ 30 psi in my rear TKC on my 990 on the way to Inuvik and back. Just outside of Klondike river crossing on the way home i had a massive rear tore failure, rim strip cooked off, excessive heat melted the sidewalls.

I rode 38/F 40/R the next year in and out of Deadhorse no issues. These big heavy bikes running at higher speeds need more than the PSI's people are talking about. Jim Hyde at Rawhyde was big on these low pressures and recommended them to us. Post rear failure I received an unpleasant and unforgettable ass reaming from the Legendary Dick Fish regarding tire pressures on the Dempster and Dalton.

[This is the part where Mike Butt would reply to this thread with a ]
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Old 08-23-2013, 01:41 PM   #36
BOB RAMSAY
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I know what you mean -

Let see - a couple of things to say from an old enduro & gravel road rider:

- when turning solo, get up on the tank, get your foot up near the front axle and let the rear wheel do it's thing. But when you have a passenger, now you have way too much weight over the rear, making the front wheel much too light. When you try to turn with a front wheel barely skimming (I don't know how 'big' the passenger might be. . .) the front wheel just cannot 'plant' itself to allow you a confidence inspiring turn. (think: over-loaded forklift)

- Personally, I lower my tire pressure if I'm staying mostly on the gravel (25-27psi). Also, I don't blast home at 110 mph on the pavement (heat build-up). I re-fill the tires when allowed. The first time I took the Misses on the gravel with 34/38 psi, I had to pull over and let air out - NOW!

My front wheel recently changed from a 21" (KTM) to a 19" (BMW) and to me, I'm more comfortable with a narrow, taller front wheel but that's not going to stop me from riding.

I've never liked that dis-concerting feeling of vague front wheel traction. It seems that whenever I lose the front wheel, something bad happens - NOW!

And like the inmate said earlier - just slow down, you'll catch everyone eventually.


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Old 08-26-2013, 08:08 PM   #37
FloorPoor
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I often ride like a bat out of hell on dirt and gravel when solo, but with a pillion (usually one of my kids, the wife doesn't like to ride) I just put put around. It's not worth it. But I have noticed a couple of my kids are better pillions then the rest (6 total, what the hell was I thinking!?) and those are the two who get slightly faster an/or more varied terrain rides.

My wife is a terrible pillion, she only weighs 120, but she leans way back and doesn't move with the bike at all. Makes the bike handle terribly. I'm kinda glad she doesn't like to ride, It turns an otherwise fun ride into sketchville
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Old 08-27-2013, 05:34 PM   #38
joexr
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Ride , ride and ride some more. Seat time and experience. When I raced flat-track as a teenager I could do foot up donuts in both directions with my girlfriend on the back. You'll pick up speed , just push the envelope a little and find your groove. Try getting used to sliding by practicing on grass.
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Old 09-30-2013, 03:48 AM   #39
speedtrickle
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It's really a mix of everything here but the bottom line is whatever level you are at you must have confidence and the way to do that is by walking before you can run and the way to do that is to get your self a smaller, easier machine that will do the task. My point is you are making it way harder by expecting that your intercontinental cruiser is going to let you develop as a rider, newsflash it won't so get yourself a dr or something and go have some friggin FUN! Goodluck
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Old 09-30-2013, 04:25 PM   #40
joexr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speedtrickle View Post
It's really a mix of everything here but the bottom line is whatever level you are at you must have confidence and the way to do that is by walking before you can run and the way to do that is to get your self a smaller, easier machine that will do the task. My point is you are making it way harder by expecting that your intercontinental cruiser is going to let you develop as a rider, newsflash it won't so get yourself a dr or something and go have some friggin FUN! Goodluck
Well said.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:55 PM   #41
Golaiy
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Passengers change everything. You have to have a willing passenger who trusts your ability and the bikes ability. Your passenger must be part of the learning as well and they need to have a good understanding that they don't just get to sit there like a stick when you are doing some of these things. My ex was a great passenger and was willing to learn because she liked riding. I have had numerous passengers on my bikes and they all react differently until you take the time to teach them. Otherwise, take it slow.
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