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Old 10-06-2013, 06:06 PM   #76
Motocicletta
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Bicycle Content

've built hundreds (seriously hundreds) of bicycle wheels, but I really didn't know what to expect from the stiffer spoked brethren of the motorized world. Turns out, bicycle wheels have a bit more finesse involved, so I really didn't have much of a problem.

Tension and true. I looked high and low for specs on 'how much tension' but only really found recommendations to whack it with a wrench and if it sings, it's tensioned. Easy enough. For bicycle wheel building, there's a tensiometer to tell you where you're at. Not so much here, I guess. Either way, they tightened up nicely and all the hops pulled right out.

I see the Park torque wrench, tell about the bicycle, Niner tube?

I've built 4 32 spoke wheels for my bicycle, bought 'The Book' by Jobst.
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:59 PM   #77
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Originally Posted by Motocicletta View Post
I see the Park torque wrench, tell about the bicycle, Niner tube?

I've built 4 32 spoke wheels for my bicycle, bought 'The Book' by Jobst.

I wondered if anybody would notice my Niner brand breaker bar. I cut it out of a warrantee frame that came through the shop. Throwing it away seemed like a waste of nice Reynolds tubing. I use it constantly and it makes me smile every time.

Nice work on the home wheel builds, a tip of the hat to you. I've perused The Book and it seems like a fine source of info. I originally learned wheel building at home with the help of Sheldon Brown's webpage. Sadly Sheldon passed away, but his webpage is still maintained by his old bike shop. Once I became an occasional mechanic, I built a lot more wheels and figured out a few tricks to speed up the process, but generally I still do it exactly as Sheldon wrote it out.

I was reflecting a bit on Shop Class As Soul Craft with my friend Doug today and it got us talking about the desire to tackle these sorts of hair-brained projects ourselves while so many seem perfectly happy to hire it out (or avoid it entirely). He mentioned that his curiosity was the driving factor behind his recreational projects. I decided that for me its a certain bullheaded determination that moves me forward. Either way, we both find ourselves working odd hours on odd projects purely because we want to...despite the giant pain in the ass of it all. Maybe its a hunt for knowledge or maybe its just a way to occupy idle hands, but in the end i think the compulsion is a rewarding one. After some of the looks I get from people who obviously think I'm crazy to tread these waters, I love knowing that there are other guys out there learning how to do cool shit in their garages.

...Or maybe I've just been drinking and pontificating with my friends too much this weekend...
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:51 AM   #78
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Shop Class as Soul Craft is an amazing book. I wish that it had been around when I was in my teens. I have recommended it or given copies of it to at least a dozen people, and they've all come back with the same impression. The book is full of ideas and values that I share, but somehow hearing it from the mouth of some guy with a PhD gives it a little more weight. Very validating.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:18 AM   #79
Billedale
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Until you've checked everything, something could go wrong.
I agree... Just expect everything you didn't check to give up on you at a later date --> Been there :-)

It's an old bike that's obviously seen some abuse and poor repairs, it's like a shelter dog, it needs lots of love to understand it can give some back.

Glad to hear about your project, though it was dead for some time and it had me worried :(. Keep going, loving it!
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Billedale screwed with this post 10-07-2013 at 06:23 AM
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Old 10-07-2013, 02:02 PM   #80
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Well, that's why I'm servicing it after all. My intention is to touch (and inspect) every piece on the bike. I'd really like to avoid having broken stuff immediately after rebuild. Although, if that happens it'll probably be because I screwed up rather that the part failed at a bad time.

And don't worry, I don't know how to quit once I get started. Mostly it's just that my business is such that I'm either incredibly busy or almost completely unencumbered. I just came off a month of late nights and have a few free days ahead of me, so more engine stripping will follow shortly. I'm hoping to be riding the old gal by spring. :)
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:54 AM   #81
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Old 10-09-2013, 01:06 PM   #82
JonnyCash
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^Hahahaha
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:47 PM   #83
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Must be a Range Rover.
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Old 10-11-2013, 09:46 AM   #84
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Yeah...I guess this is what happens when I get bored and have Photoshop open. Now, if only I could find the 'monetized viral image' button, I'd be all set.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:05 PM   #85
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The evenings grow dim and the engine beckons! After plenty of studying, I decided to pull the top end and see what sort of dent I can expect in my bank account. I'm planning on jugs and pistons, but all else is a question mark for me.

Before I started, I thought it'd be fun to throw the front wheel on the frame. Love it!

 photo IMG_0417_zps8235ee17.jpg


You can see my big score of the weekend...a work platform. Sweet! I was thinking of building something similar out of lumber, but a friend saved me the trouble by giving this to me. He was sick of having it in his garage and I needed one. Perfect timing.


Okay, enough playing around. Back to the engine. First the valve rockers must go:

 photo IMG_0420_zps0beeb34e.jpg


Then the rocker mount. These bolts took a real steroid jerk to loosen up. I think my grunts and 'Oh YEAH!' s aroused some looks from passerbys on the sidewalk. Finally all the bastards cracked:

 photo IMG_0426_zpsef6e237b.jpg


Then the remaining two head bolts needed to come out. The lower was easy, but the sleeve bolt took some work. Finally it creaked loose with the help of a few different tools:

 photo IMG_0428_zps936e6371.jpg


Now the head pops right off, right? Just a quick pull, says the internet. Much more grunting and sweating ensues:

 photo IMG_0427_zps688de058.jpg


Finally I got it off and had a piston to look at. Just like that.

 photo IMG_0429_zpsd3086f31.jpg


Again I'd read that a quick pull would do it. Again, much grunting and sweating was required. It was especially hard to get them started since I didn't want to get a screwdriver anywhere near my gasket surfaces or the fins. Thankfully I've been wrestling grizzly bears in preparation to build stamina. In comparison, heads and gaskets are easy.

Okay, top end officially removed and cataloged.

 photo IMG_0444_zps3f07ed96.jpg


Now to check out these chrome bores I've spent years reading about. A quick magnet check confirms chrome bore. The left side actually looks pretty good to me:

 photo IMG_0434_zpsf5f5fb14.jpg


The right side, however, seems to be showing off some of that flaking I've heard so much about.

 photo IMG_0443_zps46e58729.jpg


Oh well. Gilardoni is such a cool name, it'd be a shame NOT to install them, right? I'm thinking I'll get the rest out, do my tolerance checks, then order up jugs and whatever else is outside of spec.

Now I hear tell that the sump is supposed to come off so I can get to the con rods? Roger that.

 photo IMG_0447_zps6aebdd7c.jpg


Next up I'll pull the pistons and get the crank and cam out of there. Then the calipers will get a workout and we'll see where we're at.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:56 PM   #86
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Jugs and Slugs



I've a set of pristine barrels and pistons left over from the Eldo. I'm gonna keep 'em. The barrels can be Nikasiled for only slightly less than the Gilardoni's...
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Old 10-11-2013, 08:20 PM   #87
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Nice
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Old 10-12-2013, 05:47 AM   #88
danedg
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I found the 50 piece tap and die set from Sears to be an indispensible addition to my toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts had some sort of schmutz and corrosion, and were MUCH happier going back together after a little chase...

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Old 10-15-2013, 08:34 AM   #89
photomd
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I found the 50 piece tap and die set from Sears to be an indispensible addition to my toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts had some sort of schmutz and corrosion, and were MUCH happier going back together after a little chase...

I'll second that. My Guzzi build required almost every stud and thread to be chased to get the new fasteners on without binding.

You've got a very cool bike. I can't wait to see it together: she's gonna be beeeaaauuutiful!
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Old 10-22-2013, 07:59 AM   #90
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Okay, back at it. I pulled the oil pump, pistons/con rods, and the starter ring gear.




The con rods took a bit of jimmying, but came out fairly easily. I'll have to post pictures of them later, but the half bearings look to be in perfect condition. I may replace them just because, but I'm not sure that it's all that necessary. I'll throw calipers on them to be sure, though.




Then the starter gear comes off:




Yeeeuuuckk!




No wonder my clutch felt like shit. On those initial rides, it never felt like it was fully engaging or disengaging and now I know why. This this was so choked with crap that the plates could barely move. Is this normal for a dry clutch? I've never opened one up before, but it struck me as pretty bad for the overall operation. Also, it looks like there was some oil of some sort on the clutch plates which could have contributed to the sludgy mess in the splines?




There looks to be plenty of shoe left on the clutch plates, but again I'll check my tolerances and replace if necessary. Right now I'm inclined to think that the problem was caused by oil/sludge in the clutch box more than by worn clutch plates, which was my original assumption.

Now I just need to pull the flywheel and get the crank out, which I should be able to work on tomorrow.





Other big news is that I decided on a liquid painter and dropped everything off yesterday. I'll be excited to see the results. The estimate was 30-45 days, so hopefully by early December I'll have some shiny new tins to show off!
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