ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Fluff > Shiny things
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 11 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 09-08-2013, 12:57 PM   #31
James Adams
Misplaced
 
James Adams's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Metromess
Oddometer: 8,495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniper X View Post
You do know you can monitize that in a way right? Round here, if one has an ultralight, and a couple good cameras or doesn't mind the film industry putting cameras on them, they can make some serious dough. Up to 1500 a day flying round and shooting video...and NO you can't use POS consumer cameras.
Not legal.

Quote:
14 CFR 103.1(b): [The ultralight vehicle] is used or intended to be used for refrain or sport uses only.
Having a valid commercial pilot certificate does not change this, though FAR 103.5 does make the provision for a waiver.

That said, I'd love to get an ultralight or similar. There are a handful of small private airstrips around here and we're far enough away that the DFW airspace is easy to stay under. Although, since I have a commercial MEL, so I'd be tempted to go the with something like the Air Cam.

IIRC, experimental (incl. E-LSA) aircraft also cannot be used to carry passengers for hire, although I don't believe that cameras would not be an issue (since they're not passengers or cargo).

James Adams screwed with this post 09-08-2013 at 01:04 PM
James Adams is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2013, 09:23 PM   #32
aboveangkor
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Oddometer: 65
I been into ultralights since the late seventy's.When they were cheap but cheaply made.Some of the first kits sold for a few thousand.Now a prop can cost that much.I joke that Sport Pilot added a zero to the price and thats just in the last 20 years.Hundred,even hundred twenty thousand dollars is nothing for a Light Sport plane now.Old guys got tricked into backing SP because they thought they wouldn't need a medical.Right at the end they changed it to read if you have never been denied a medical you can fly without one.But they never liked ultralights anyway.Always talking trash.I used to go to all the big shows,Oshkosh and Sun&Fun every year.EAA is all about the money.The people that bring the planes that make the show still have to pay lots of money.Venders I can understand.Rant over.
Its not legal to use an ultralight,Light Sport or experimental to make money.Hard to enforce though.
As far as back country camping,I would think the hardest thing would be fuel.You have a 240# payload so weight don't look to be your problem.Its space.Behind the seat and between the gear legs might work.Maybe even inside the wings for some clothes and sleeping bag.As long as you don't go crazy and change the shape of the wing.People do it in trike all the time.Or air mattress to keep from sinking if your flying over water and have an engine out.
You ask about the primer bulb.Better leave it in.You have a long run from the tank to the pump.If it starts getting hard or at the first signs of cracking,change it.Always get the best one you can find.Spare no expense.They have caused lots of engine outs. And keep an eye on that tank,metal tanks cause condensation.Bad or loss of fuel supply cause more engine outs than all other things combined.Pull those float bowls and check for water all the time.If your careful,you can use the cork gasket many times.And if you fill the bowls before you put them back,it will start right up.Thats what the primer bulb does.
aboveangkor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 07:28 PM   #33
jeepinbanditrider OP
Dunkin Donuts Crasher
 
jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: MCAS MIRAMAR
Oddometer: 1,131
Quote:
Originally Posted by aboveangkor View Post
I been into ultralights since the late seventy's.When they were cheap but cheaply made.Some of the first kits sold for a few thousand.Now a prop can cost that much.I joke that Sport Pilot added a zero to the price and thats just in the last 20 years.Hundred,even hundred twenty thousand dollars is nothing for a Light Sport plane now.Old guys got tricked into backing SP because they thought they wouldn't need a medical.Right at the end they changed it to read if you have never been denied a medical you can fly without one.But they never liked ultralights anyway.Always talking trash.I used to go to all the big shows,Oshkosh and Sun&Fun every year.EAA is all about the money.The people that bring the planes that make the show still have to pay lots of money.Venders I can understand.Rant over.
Its not legal to use an ultralight,Light Sport or experimental to make money.Hard to enforce though.
As far as back country camping,I would think the hardest thing would be fuel.You have a 240# payload so weight don't look to be your problem.Its space.Behind the seat and between the gear legs might work.Maybe even inside the wings for some clothes and sleeping bag.As long as you don't go crazy and change the shape of the wing.People do it in trike all the time.Or air mattress to keep from sinking if your flying over water and have an engine out.
You ask about the primer bulb.Better leave it in.You have a long run from the tank to the pump.If it starts getting hard or at the first signs of cracking,change it.Always get the best one you can find.Spare no expense.They have caused lots of engine outs. And keep an eye on that tank,metal tanks cause condensation.Bad or loss of fuel supply cause more engine outs than all other things combined.Pull those float bowls and check for water all the time.If your careful,you can use the cork gasket many times.And if you fill the bowls before you put them back,it will start right up.Thats what the primer bulb does.
Excellent advice yet again Thank you so much. There does seem to be a drift between Ultralight guys and "real" pilots. Even within our club you can see it. It is what it is. I have a flying buddy down here now. We were even working out our emergency procedures today figuring out what we would do if one of us went down. He's in a T-Bird. The fuel system and ignition lines are going to be rebuilt at 175 hour inspection/maintenance cycle. I keep the fuel tank topped off between flights. That should minimize condensation buildup within the tank.

Here are some pictures from today flying with Matt and his T-Bird.

Some fires going on. Weirdly no TFRs were issued on this as far as we can tell but the Helo and Fire Tankers were pounding it hard. Lots of traffic in and out of the area. We kept our distance, kept scanning and announcing our position. Also made sure my strobes were kicked on.





My buddies T-Bird






Looking towards downtown San Diego and the coast. You can't really see it in this picture but I could see it with my own eyes.
__________________
2004 Suzuki DL650 Weestrom
1978 GS 1000
"Those who would trade security for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
jeepinbanditrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 08:28 PM   #34
aboveangkor
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Oddometer: 65
Good idea to keep the tank topped off.Still want to drain it every couple of months just to be sure.Does the line come out the top or bottom?I can't see in the pictures.
What do you mean by "ignition lines"? The starter wires? Keep the kill switch wires away from your radio.They can bleed over.Keep a close eye on the starter mounts.And listen for any change in sound on start up.There have been some problems with the starter not being mounted right.Something with the shims.I had one but sold it before using it.GPL i think it was.
There's a man in AZ thats a guru for any small ultralight motor but he's not easy to deal with.Some people hate him.But I''ve been to his place and if you just tell him the problem and let him do all the talking he's OK. His name is Steve Betty.Airscrew Performance.
You might want to look at getting one of these.http://www.zaon.aero/content/view/2/41/Cheaper than a transponder.And like the radio,you can take it home with you.Never leave stuff on the plane that can be stolen.
Tbird is a good plane.But like a fat chick,don't take any close up pictures!Half a mile is close enough.
aboveangkor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 08:36 PM   #35
jeepinbanditrider OP
Dunkin Donuts Crasher
 
jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: MCAS MIRAMAR
Oddometer: 1,131
I'll have to take a look at that traffic alert system.

The T-Bird doesn't look horrible but I like it's "homeliness". His is a little more rough field ready than mine.

I mean plug wires. I don't know why I didn't just say that. Fuel drains from the bottom of the tank. I'm thinking of installing a fuel collator or at least a temp on/off drain like a button of some kind. The tank has an on/off valve but it's safety wired open.
__________________
2004 Suzuki DL650 Weestrom
1978 GS 1000
"Those who would trade security for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
jeepinbanditrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 08:46 PM   #36
oldoval
Frank Orator
 
oldoval's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Cedar City, UT
Oddometer: 484
Nice plane, I'm jealous. I took a quick ride in an ultralight trike about 10 years ago with an instructor and I've wanted one ever since. Cards haven't fallen in place though. Love the open air flying.

I really like these new Sport Pilot class trikes with the 4 stroke Rotax.

http://www.evolutiontrikes.com/



.......................................
__________________
http://nathanwiley.smugmug.com/
oldoval is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 09:11 PM   #37
aboveangkor
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Oddometer: 65
Some people put a loop in the fuel line near the bottom of the tank.About four or five inches across.Held by a zip tie.The water settles there where you can see it.
The Revo trikes are nice.I have known Larry and Abid for ten years.Abid is on his own now.Talked to him on skype last week for two hours.Hadn't seen him since the show in Blois France a few years ago.I like everything about the Revo but the price and weight.A hundred pounds too much and a hundred thousand dollars.And the used ones are going for 65 to 70 thousand.About 50 sold since they started.Airborne,P&M,and Air Creation have all sold over 4000 each.
Air Creation has always been top of the line.Untill you need parts.Airborne makes a good machine.I put 1410 hours on a P&M 450GT in seventeen months giving rides around Angkor Wat and the other temples here in Siem Reap.Maybe the most trike for the money right now.As the Australian dollar falls the Airborne is looking good again.I've flown over thirty models.They all have their good and bad parts.
I fly trikes but I love everything that flies.Even PPG and PPC.
aboveangkor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 09:46 PM   #38
oldoval
Frank Orator
 
oldoval's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Cedar City, UT
Oddometer: 484
Quote:
Originally Posted by aboveangkor View Post
Some people put a loop in the fuel line near the bottom of the tank.About four or five inches across.Held by a zip tie.The water settles there where you can see it.
The Revo trikes are nice.I have known Larry and Abid for ten years.Abid is on his own now.Talked to him on skype last week for two hours.Hadn't seen him since the show in Blois France a few years ago.I like everything about the Revo but the price and weight.A hundred pounds too much and a hundred thousand dollars.And the used ones are going for 65 to 70 thousand.About 50 sold since they started.Airborne,P&M,and Air Creation have all sold over 4000 each.
Air Creation has always been top of the line.Untill you need parts.Airborne makes a good machine.I put 1410 hours on a P&M 450GT in seventeen months giving rides around Angkor Wat and the other temples here in Siem Reap.Maybe the most trike for the money right now.As the Australian dollar falls the Airborne is looking good again.I've flown over thirty models.They all have their good and bad parts.
I fly trikes but I love everything that flies.Even PPG and PPC.
Very cool, more jealousy from me. The cost is what has kept this a dream rather than a reality for me. I've always had an affinity for Airborne's Tundra models with the big tundra tires.... it would probably fulfill my desire to go exploring in no mans land. Antares makes some rugged looking trikes too.
__________________
http://nathanwiley.smugmug.com/
oldoval is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 10:59 PM   #39
jeepinbanditrider OP
Dunkin Donuts Crasher
 
jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: MCAS MIRAMAR
Oddometer: 1,131
Zenith makes some STOL birds.
__________________
2004 Suzuki DL650 Weestrom
1978 GS 1000
"Those who would trade security for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
jeepinbanditrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 11:07 PM   #40
aboveangkor
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Oddometer: 65
Nice photos Nathan!You can see some of the stuff I shot on our old website.http://www.skyventure.org/
I have hundreds of hours in the Airborne trikes.Some 503 and 912 time but mostly 582.When I first came to Cambodia in 2002 to work with the U.of Sydney archeologists we did aerial mapping and surveying with a Wizard 582 that we called a white back.Its a Edge X without a pod.The smaller tires but just like a Outback.We put 800 hours on it.Then a student ran us in a big ditch and broke it to pieces.
Have mixed feeling about the Antares trike.I don't like the front froks or pedals.And Sergiy can be hard to reach if you need anything.Some times he's in Alaska and other times Poland.But they are rugged and Barnstormers always have some for 8 to 10 thousand.A good used Outback will be about 15000. I really like the Wizard for low and slow.And it breaks down quick and easy for travel.That way you can keep it at home and save on hanger fees.A four by eight foot trailer,some roof racks for the wing and away you go.
aboveangkor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 01:43 PM   #41
jeepinbanditrider OP
Dunkin Donuts Crasher
 
jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: MCAS MIRAMAR
Oddometer: 1,131





Sent from my iPhone
__________________
2004 Suzuki DL650 Weestrom
1978 GS 1000
"Those who would trade security for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
jeepinbanditrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 02:09 PM   #42
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Bend, Oregon summer, Snowbird in winter
Oddometer: 2,618
I bought a 2 place PPC in 1997 and went the BFI route because my then 9 year old daughter wanted to fly with me. Since then I've logged over 1400 hours, became an instructor examiner, and cut my machine back to a single place ultralight when the FAA rules changed. My daughter soloed when she turned 16 and is now a proficient pilot. I live in a great part of the country for flying and it's still good fun. One of the great advantages of a PPC is you can store it in the garage and haul it around on a small trailer. That makes it convenient to see different parts of the country without having to fly there and deal with weather, accommodations, etc.. The engine is a Rotax 582 that is still all original except for the gaskets required to disassemble and check it out every few hundred hours.



This is me flying over the Sisters Mtns near my home.


hugemoth screwed with this post 09-13-2013 at 02:14 PM
hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 02:53 PM   #43
UngaWunga
Mosquito bait
 
UngaWunga's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: NH
Oddometer: 6,927
Holy crap you've got some altitude on that thing.
__________________
"There isn't any secret," he said. "It's all very obvious."
UngaWunga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 02:56 PM   #44
jeepinbanditrider OP
Dunkin Donuts Crasher
 
jeepinbanditrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: MCAS MIRAMAR
Oddometer: 1,131
Ultralight!

How many hours are on that 582? I'm actually liking my 503 a lot. I was worried about I reliability and and all that stuff but this one hasn't missed a beat. I keep a close eye on CHT and EGT. I've also done lots of reading on the differences between running a 2 stroke and a 4 stroke.

The 503 in mine just turned 163.7 hours this morning after a 1.5 hour flight to the east.

I was up around 8000 feet today. I needed to be at 7 k to clear the mountains before the desert then went up to 8k when I turned around and headed back west.

It lost a little climb performance at that altitude. From 7 to 8 k I was only able to make about 350 FPM.
Sent from my iPhone
__________________
2004 Suzuki DL650 Weestrom
1978 GS 1000
"Those who would trade security for a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
jeepinbanditrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 03:39 PM   #45
hugemoth
Beastly Adventurer
 
hugemoth's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Bend, Oregon summer, Snowbird in winter
Oddometer: 2,618
Over 1400 hours on my 582.

Most ultralight pilots would say the 503 is the best ultralight engine, period. A friend of mine has over 1200 hours on one with zero problems. Rotax recommends a total rebuild on their ultralight engines every 300 hours, including a new crankshaft! Main things with the 2 stroke engines is to keep them lubricated, keep the moisture out during storage, keep the temps in the proper range during flight, and a good warm up before take off. I have an EIS with all the temp probes but really the only one I watch is the EGT.

I've been up to 15,300' in my PPC, about 11,000 in the pic above. My friend Bud Gish set the official PPC altitude record a few years ago of over 20,000' using a 503 engine. Most fun though is flying at 10' to 100'.

One way to make a bit of money with an ultralight is to sell your own aerial photos for magazines, calendars, etc.. I've made a few bucks that way over the years.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepinbanditrider View Post
How many hours are on that 582? I'm actually liking my 503 a lot. I was worried about I reliability and and all that stuff but this one hasn't missed a beat. I keep a close eye on CHT and EGT. I've also done lots of reading on the differences between running a 2 stroke and a 4 stroke.

The 503 in mine just turned 163.7 hours this morning after a 1.5 hour flight to the east.

I was up around 8000 feet today. I needed to be at 7 k to clear the mountains before the desert then went up to 8k when I turned around and headed back west.

It lost a little climb performance at that altitude. From 7 to 8 k I was only able to make about 350 FPM.
Sent from my iPhone
hugemoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014