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Old 09-07-2013, 04:24 PM   #1
_lee OP
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First Aid; recommendations, what do you bring along a 4,000 mile trip?

I want to stock up with the a sufficient amount of first aid for this trip, but need to limit what I bring.

What do you fine medical folks recommend?
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Old 09-07-2013, 06:45 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _lee View Post
I want to stock up with the a sufficient amount of first aid for this trip, but need to limit what I bring.

What do you fine medical folks recommend?
Much relates to your level of training and whether this is intended for self-aid or in support of others.
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:07 PM   #3
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With space at a premium I carry a military style 3 pocket pouch, and since I'm just basic first aid, more to stabilize until the experts get to the scene, and there will be an infinite number of answers but here is mine:

Scissors, forceps, bandages (veterinary grade work fine and are cheaper) aluminum splint, cervical collar (fold up plastic) rubber gloves, Tylenol, Benadryl, alcohol wipes, band aids, Neosporin (watch the expire date), eye drops, tweezers, paper towels.

In addition odds and ends such as some wire, parachute cord, electrical tape that can double as bandage tape, duct tape, safety pins, extra bandana.

You'd be surprised how much you can fit in this, the heavy duty one is much better than the lighter one I used to have.

Voodoo tactical is good gear

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Voodoo-Tactical-Tri-fold-M3-Medical-Bag-First-Aid-Kit-Medic-EMT-EMS-Olive-/171120732659
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Old 09-11-2013, 02:19 AM   #4
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I've been a Paramedic for too many years now, but I'll try to give a decent answer ;)

What Cannonshot said is spot on, bring what you can reasonably use (based on your experience and training), but remember first aid isn't just life threatening stuff on a bike. I had all my gear in a backpack on a recent ride when an old rotator cuff injury (from years of pulling really fat people out of really small, really fucked up cars) flared up. If it weren't for some ibuprofen I'd have been stranded. I just couldn't ride safely in that much pain.

I bring a large abdominal pad for covering up and/or putting pressure on the big and/or spurting wounds, 10 or so 4x4's (their incredibly useful and small), a roll of gauze or kling, A roll of medical tape (for the bike repairs as much as the medical emergencies), Sinus medication, 50 or so Ibuprofen, a roll of antacids (drinking gives me heartburn ), trauma shears (again a damn useful tool for bikes and people) and a few band aids.

You might add to that a tourniquet (back in vogue in medicine after years as a cast off, but you better know when to use it and when not to....and if you do need one they're easy to make with a strap/belt and a stick), a CPR mask/shield and maybe some wound cleaner/antibiotic ointment (on a long ride that knuckle you scraped changing that flat could be a serious problem 2 days from now).

But that's me.
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Old 09-11-2013, 02:34 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tucson Jim View Post
With space at a premium I carry a military style 3 pocket pouch, and since I'm just basic first aid, more to stabilize until the experts get to the scene, and there will be an infinite number of answers but here is mine:

Scissors, forceps, bandages (veterinary grade work fine and are cheaper) aluminum splint, cervical collar (fold up plastic) rubber gloves, Tylenol, Benadryl, alcohol wipes, band aids, Neosporin (watch the expire date), eye drops, tweezers, paper towels.

In addition odds and ends such as some wire, parachute cord, electrical tape that can double as bandage tape, duct tape, safety pins, extra bandana.

You'd be surprised how much you can fit in this, the heavy duty one is much better than the lighter one I used to have.

Voodoo tactical is good gear

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Voodoo-Tactical-Tri-fold-M3-Medical-Bag-First-Aid-Kit-Medic-EMT-EMS-Olive-/171120732659
Not to be a dick because maybe Jim is well trained and has a damn good reason for carrying the stuff he does, but FOR WHERE I RIDE where there's not always cell coverage, but another rider could get to where there is coverage within 30 minutes, I'll critique his load out a bit.

If you need a splint or a cervical collar you need to wait for medical professionals to get there. No need to carry those, IMHO. They're designed to stabilize an injury for transport. We (as riders) are not transporting a rider that needs either of these.

Forceps too are IMHO useless. Clamping off a bleeder is a bad idea. Pressure, elevate and a tourniquet if it gets to that point.

The rest of what you have hear seems quite useful though. Nicely thought out kit. I specifically like the eye drops. A piece of dust/gravel to the eye can end a ride in a hurry. I may add this to my own.
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Old 09-11-2013, 04:37 AM   #6
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pretty much the same as if one is taking an extended self contained hike to remote wilderness.

any meds you normally would need. take prescription eye drops. 100mg (60) Doxycycline for malaria if you are traveling in tropics. Imodium (loperamide) antidiarrheal, Pepto Bismol tablets, aspirin, Ace bandage, cough/cold med, Deet insect, etc. etc.

visit CDC website for travel kit recommendations. CDC also recommends certain drugs for certain countries. link above for Doxycycline came from CDC.

normal over the counter drugs may not be so available in other countries. take a mini-sew kit with Leatherman.

tell your doctor what you are doing. carry prescription drugs in original bottle with your name. you should have a ditty bag just for meds. compacts down very small.


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Old 09-11-2013, 02:26 PM   #7
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A packet of aspirin, immodium and a few band aid, I travel light.
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:58 PM   #8
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4000 files across Congo is a lot different than 4000 miles on coast to coast interstate.

Most people don't have the skills to do anything notable, so they just bring convenience items like a whole bunch of bandages, gauze and random ointments that are not going to make any meaningful difference. I don't really bother with any of it. For longer trips, I will bring QuikClot gauze and convenience medicines like Advil, Immodium, and whatever else is recommended for some country.
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Old 09-15-2013, 03:45 PM   #9
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Don't bother with a bunch of stuff you're not trained/qualified to use. You do need to bring enough sterile pads/wraps whatever to "stop the bleeding" till pro help arrives. You're not going to fix anybody, just keep'em from bleeding out and going into shock till the pros get there. I also like the blow up splints for an arm or leg. Depends on where you intend to ride and how far/fast real med help is. Again...your NOT going to fix anyone. Best you can do is keep them alive till real med help arrives. I used to do a lot of Atlantic crossings and many days from from help if someone gets hurt and our ships med kit didn't include them but my personal stash included a broad spectrum antibiotic like Cipro. Expensive but usually works and it keeps well.
If you're going really remote touring, I strongly suggest one of your party spend the money for a basic first aid class. I've taken a few as required by Fed law and they don't make you qualified for zip but will teach you a few things NOT TO DO. Run your plans by the instructor for advice on what to bring along on your specific trip.
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Old 09-29-2013, 07:26 AM   #10
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Med Kit

I would agree with most of the above comments. I tend to match my bike kit with what I would carry on extended backcountry hikes. Maybe a bit overkill if a riding partner can access help but you never know. I tend to also carry a small SAM splint. A very versatile and handy item that is light and packs well for me. Second the need for extra pain meds also, back pain, shoulder pain, wrist pain, headaches can ruin a day.
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Old 09-29-2013, 05:34 PM   #11
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I kind of work on the assumption that I just need to get myself fixed enough to get to experts, or home. My kit has the usual stuff, pain (ibuprofin), antibiotics, eye drops (I hate crap in my eye) bandaids and some butterfiys, finger splint, lots of tape, gauze rolls, and 4" pads, and duct tape. Super glue will close a cut real good too. This should get me out.

It also occurs to me, i keep some basics in my ditty bag too, anti bacterial handsoap, a blister kit, and a few more bandaids.

Is whiskey first aid?
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:17 PM   #12
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Some Motrin, Alka-Selter, Benadryl, Imodium, tweezers, and a SPOT locator. Anything more and you might do more harm than good.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:29 PM   #13
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I would start with a Wilderness Medicine Institute First Aid or Advanced First Aid course (higher level if you have the time and inclination). You'll get a good idea of what you need, but you'll also get the training you need to use it. I don't know your level of training, but as stated before, your gear should be relative to your level of training.

To increase your level of training is better than bringing things you don't know how to use.

So, I recommend bringing knowledge, skills and abilities.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:17 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
I would start with a Wilderness Medicine Institute First Aid or Advanced First Aid course (higher level if you have the time and inclination). You'll get a good idea of what you need, but you'll also get the training you need to use it. I don't know your level of training, but as stated before, your gear should be relative to your level of training.

To increase your level of training is better than bringing things you don't know how to use.

So, I recommend bringing knowledge, skills and abilities.
Good advice here.
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:03 AM   #15
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Which 4,000 miles. Most places you are not more than a few miles from a drug store or doctor. Duct tape, tweezers, ibuprofen, Neosporin.
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