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Old 10-09-2013, 07:43 AM   #61
Sting32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PSchrauber View Post
The scarcity of availability of still good running motorcycles of this type due to the insufficient availability of spare parts will (probably) in long term increasing the demand.

Hopefully even more confusing.
That is FUN NEEE right there? I guess? I mean I doubt it.

the bikes that are the cheapest and easiest to get parts for, will be the bikes that end up with a "solid" big class.

IMHO in the USA, "Air Cooled Mono" I would think, that would have been a good 86-87 era TY350 class. Maybe with Montessa and Fantic occasionally?

With the Yamaha, it seems most don't have trouble finding these complete and running. I guess it seems to me, that often used parts, like levers and other things that break wear out are still easier to find? I have had 2 of these, never had to search for anything for one, unlike the 2 Fantics I have (240 pro). We still see at least one TY 350 being ridden in Modern trials in our club, there might been 2 of them at a couple regionals. Never see a old "other brands" though, not in 10 years or more, though. but then again I only go to 5 states to ride, every year (tx, ok, ks, ne, mo) oh and visited, nm.

But, I don't see this happening as such for the disc braked, air-cooled, mono shock class (aka after Yamaha quit shipping to usa?) The bikes other than Yamaha for the mono class (air cooled) seem to have vanished along with spare parts long before anyone thought of "vintage" classes for these bike, as in back when they were "modern" wouldn't you admit?

Plus, I see people on say a 1977 Ty250, that they have almost as much money in, as I do buying a new modern bike every year. Don't act like custom (yet at home) reworking everything (for example work like even MotoBene did on his own modern bikes) is NOT expensive for most anyone else to accomplish... if they have to source it out, like many people would.

OH, does the drum braked air cooled mono shock class compete directly with disc brake bikes? I assume so, but that leaves ya with disadvantages being on the TY, if it rains?

What I see next could be some neat hybrids maybe? take a 77 TY and put that engine into a clapped out 93 gasgas frame, would that be legal?
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Old 10-09-2013, 09:23 AM   #62
PSchrauber
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sting32 View Post
That is FUN NEEE right there? I guess? I mean I doubt it.

the bikes that are the cheapest and easiest to get parts for, will be the bikes that end up with a "solid" big class.

IMHO in the USA, "Air Cooled Mono" I would think, that would have been a good 86-87 era TY350 class. Maybe with Montessa and Fantic occasionally?

With the Yamaha, it seems most don't have trouble finding these complete and running. I guess it seems to me, that often used parts, like levers and other things that break wear out are still easier to find? I have had 2 of these, never had to search for anything for one, unlike the 2 Fantics I have (240 pro). We still see at least one TY 350 being ridden in Modern trials in our club, there might been 2 of them at a couple regionals. Never see a old "other brands" though, not in 10 years or more, though. but then again I only go to 5 states to ride, every year (tx, ok, ks, ne, mo) oh and visited, nm.

But, I don't see this happening as such for the disc braked, air-cooled, mono shock class (aka after Yamaha quit shipping to usa?) The bikes other than Yamaha for the mono class (air cooled) seem to have vanished along with spare parts long before anyone thought of "vintage" classes for these bike, as in back when they were "modern" wouldn't you admit?

Plus, I see people on say a 1977 Ty250, that they have almost as much money in, as I do buying a new modern bike every year. Don't act like custom (yet at home) reworking everything (for example work like even MotoBene did on his own modern bikes) is NOT expensive for most anyone else to accomplish... if they have to source it out, like many people would.

OH, does the drum braked air cooled mono shock class compete directly with disc brake bikes? I assume so, but that leaves ya with disadvantages being on the TY, if it rains?

What I see next could be some neat hybrids maybe? take a 77 TY and put that engine into a clapped out 93 gasgas frame, would that be legal?
LuMo = "Air Cooled Monoshock" is the class it's named were I live.

And yes, until a couple of weeks ago I did not know that it is a real fun to ride these bikes. They have some advantages compared to the twin shock bikes in weight, frame layout, suspension and brakes.

I got mine just for sentimental reasons and because I needed a bike with better brakes for riding in the Alpes. However, after the first few rides I have found out, that the operation is refreshingly different. The driving style is more active, you can take up obstacles far later and the rear suspension allows you to climb steps easier, tight curves also go better, but traction is worse, especially on slippery surfaces, as well as the straight-line riding doesn't work as good. Compared to a modern bike there is still too much weight, the engine isn't as flexible in power output, (more on the snappy side), hand "bouncing" around is due to the heavy weight very tiring / complicated.

I believe too that we will in future mostly see bikes were parts are still available and which were made back in the days in bigger numbers, the TY 250 mono is one of them, (btw. the later "pinky" model had a disc brake at the front wheel).

And when refurbished well, they do look too very cool, think about all the strange colors they had, pink, mint, turquoise, ... I send you some pic's of mine via PN, the design of the mid eighties to beginning 90's is very particularly.
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Old 10-09-2013, 09:43 AM   #63
Sting32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PSchrauber View Post
LuMo = "Air Cooled Monoshock" is the class it's named were I live.

And yes, until a couple of weeks ago I did not know that it is a real fun to ride these bikes. They have some advantages compared to the twin shock bikes in weight, frame layout, suspension and brakes.

I got mine just for sentimental reasons and because I needed a bike with better brakes for riding in the Alpes. However, after the first few rides I have found out, that the operation is refreshingly different. The driving style is more active, you can take up obstacles far later and the rear suspension allows you to climb steps easier, tight curves also go better, but traction is worse, especially on slippery surfaces, as well as the straight-line riding doesn't work as good. Compared to a modern bike there is still too much weight, the engine isn't as flexible in power output, (more on the snappy side), hand "bouncing" around is due to the heavy weight very tiring / complicated.

I believe too that we will in future mostly see bikes were parts are still available and which were made back in the days in bigger numbers, the TY 250 mono is one of them, (btw. the later "pinky" model had a disc brake at the front wheel).

And when refurbished well, they do look too very cool, think about all the strange colors they had, pink, mint, turquoise, ... I send you some pic's of mine via PN, the design of the mid eighties to beginning 90's is very particularly.
Yeah, I hoped you didn't take my post as "picking" at you personally, thanks, and I think we agree on many points.

I'm Just being a little bit of a hack-job though, as we ended up with a "watercooled" but OLD 93 gasgas, which IMHO isn't that much better than Lineaway's fantic in this thread.
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:42 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by brewtus View Post
Proof that Bob's Pile-O'-Fantic actually arrived in Roswell -
That was a way fast rebuild! Nice!
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Old 10-30-2013, 05:42 PM   #65
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Well, it was time to replace the cheng chin with a proper trials tire.
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Old 10-30-2013, 05:52 PM   #66
lineaway OP
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We have our next event this weekend and our final vintage event the following week end. A nice used Irc and a couple of side screws since this rim was a tubeless design.

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Old 10-30-2013, 06:22 PM   #67
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We have our next event this weekend and our final vintage event the following week end. A nice used Irc and a couple of side screws since this rim was a tubeless design.
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Old 11-01-2013, 03:52 PM   #68
Gordo83
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I have an 85 TY350 that is a great B line bike and trail bike. Our area has no class for it other than Modern. I ride a Vintage Twin Shock, but really like the TY.
The only thing I don't like is I have to run 12 to 15 pounds in the rear tire or it falls off the bead. It has the stock gold rims, but no matter what I try, I can't keep the bead on the rim at less than 12 pounds. I have a Dunlop D803 on there now.
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Old 11-01-2013, 04:19 PM   #69
lineaway OP
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Our ITSA club just started the air cooled mono`s this year. I rode many a trials on the TY350. I had an `86 in 1986, but many `85`s through the years. Thought the Ty350 is the best bike of all time! Glad to hear you are still having fun on one!
Yes, it`s hard to find the tube type tires any more. The Dunlap seems to hold the bead the best of the tubeless variety.
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Old 11-01-2013, 06:29 PM   #70
dmay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordo83 View Post
I have an 85 TY350 that is a great B line bike and trail bike. Our area has no class for it other than Modern. I ride a Vintage Twin Shock, but really like the TY.
The only thing I don't like is I have to run 12 to 15 pounds in the rear tire or it falls off the bead. It has the stock gold rims, but no matter what I try, I can't keep the bead on the rim at less than 12 pounds. I have a Dunlop D803 on there now.

Haven't tried myself but http://www.nuetech.com/
Dunlops do seem to hold on the best,but that's on akront rims fitted to euro trials bikes.(Which are all 36 spoke rims)
You have 32 spoke rims,If I still had a TY350 I'd investigate getting a modern tubeless rim mounted up. The Z-spokes could be the limiting factor though.
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Old 11-02-2013, 07:05 AM   #71
Ymirtrials
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmay View Post
Haven't tried myself but http://www.nuetech.com/
Dunlops do seem to hold on the best,but that's on akront rims fitted to euro trials bikes.(Which are all 36 spoke rims)
You have 32 spoke rims,If I still had a TY350 I'd investigate getting a modern tubeless rim mounted up. The Z-spokes could be the limiting factor though.
I've asked this question on a couple other forums how to keep a tubeless tire seated on a tube type rim....I've got akront rims on my Bultaco and have tried nearly everything short of drilling a hole and putting a screw into the tire. Don't think I can bring myself to drilling hole is the rims just yet!
Has anyone here tried this tubliss system? I really only ride the old Bult twice or so a year but this, depending on the cost, might just be the thing.
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Old 11-02-2013, 07:16 AM   #72
Ymirtrials
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmay View Post
Haven't tried myself but http://www.nuetech.com/
Dunlops do seem to hold on the best,but that's on akront rims fitted to euro trials bikes.(Which are all 36 spoke rims)
You have 32 spoke rims,If I still had a TY350 I'd investigate getting a modern tubeless rim mounted up. The Z-spokes could be the limiting factor though.
I've asked this question on a couple other forums how to keep a tubeless tire seated on a tube type rim....I've got akront rims on my Bultaco and have tried nearly everything short of drilling a hole and putting a screw into the tire. Don't think I can bring myself to drilling hole is the rims just yet!
Has anyone here tried this tubliss system? I really only ride the old Bult twice or so a year but this, depending on the cost, might just be the thing.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:29 AM   #73
lamotovita
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ymirtrials View Post
I've asked this question on a couple other forums how to keep a tubeless tire seated on a tube type rim....I've got akront rims on my Bultaco and have tried nearly everything short of drilling a hole and putting a screw into the tire. Don't think I can bring myself to drilling hole is the rims just yet!
Has anyone here tried this tubliss system? I really only ride the old Bult twice or so a year but this, depending on the cost, might just be the thing.
Hey Jay
I use take off tubeless Michelins on my Bul and TY TT rims. I inflate them to 25 PSI or so when I'm not riding the bikes and I've never had a problem.
Here's a tube type tire that I haven't tried yet. I'll probably try one next year, on either a vintage bike or on a trail bike. http://www.heidenautires.com/motor-cross-tires/k67

Seeya
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:56 AM   #74
Ymirtrials
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Originally Posted by lamotovita View Post
Hey Jay
I use take off tubeless Michelins on my Bul and TY TT rims. I inflate them to 25 PSI or so when I'm not riding the bikes and I've never had a problem.
Here's a tube type tire that I haven't tried yet. I'll probably try one next year, on either a vintage bike or on a trail bike. http://www.heidenautires.com/motor-cross-tires/k67

Seeya
I've got an x-lite on the bul right now and have tried leaving it over inflated for a month or more but when I let it down to running pressure the tire always slips down off bead in one spot. I have a Dunlop with two days on it that I may try just to see. Is that Heidenau tire a tubeless?
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:29 AM   #75
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No no no, buy what you want but stay away from Heidenau if you want to ride with a Trials bike.

The tire is good for enduros of all kind but was never intended for trials use, you will be very disappointed.
(By the way, even the manufactor states this on his home page:
Der K67 ist ein Reifen für leichtes bis mittleres Gelände der aber auch auf der Straße gute Fahreigenschaften bietet. Durch seine Optik eignet er sich hervorragend für den Einsatz auf klassischen Motorrädern und Scrambler Umbauten.
...)
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