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Old 10-09-2013, 11:51 AM   #1
AugustFalcon OP
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BMW R1100SA 2004 Brakes: Tool question

Changing the front pads out on my 04 R1100SA with the Tokico brake calipers. Each caliper has two M4 Fillister head screws holding the spring in place.

I am trying to find out the name of the kind of wrench I should use on those screws. According to the internet Fillister-Head merely refers to the fact that the screw heads are deeper than normal thereby allowing for more torque.

In this case a standard 3mm Allen wrench fits with some slop. Likewise, so does a T15 Torx. This time I would really like to not round off the inside of the heads so I'd like to find the proper wrench.

Way back in the day before Torx became popular I sort of remember being able to easily buy star shaped or fluted Allen type wrenches. Never had to learn their proper name because everyplace carried them.

Any ideas.




p.s. Will probably cross-post this at some point in the tool thread
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Old 10-09-2013, 01:37 PM   #2
James Adams
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Looks like just a regular hex head. Maybe it's an SAE size?

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Old 10-09-2013, 02:57 PM   #3
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James,

You could be right but when I look at the head it appears to have deeper than expected "points" between the "flats" and the "flats" don't appear to be flat but rather ogive shaped. Might just be a manufacturing artifact of the Fillistering process. I don't have any regular M4s to compare them too but I do have some non-Fillister M5s in stainless. I'll photograph them tomorrow at the same scale and see how they compare.

Maybe I will just have to accept that they may not be well made and live with stripping the heads on two out of the four every time I remove them.
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Old 10-09-2013, 03:34 PM   #4
X1Glider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AugustFalcon View Post
James,

You could be right but when I look at the head it appears to have deeper than expected "points" between the "flats" and the "flats" don't appear to be flat but rather ogive shaped. Might just be a manufacturing artifact of the Fillistering process. I don't have any regular M4s to compare them too but I do have some non-Fillister M5s in stainless. I'll photograph them tomorrow at the same scale and see how they compare.

Maybe I will just have to accept that they may not be well made and live with stripping the heads on two out of the four every time I remove them.
Fillister is the shape of the head, not a machining technique or anything to do with the tool used to turn it. The technique you speak of is called "broaching" and yes, those marks are a result of using that tooling. What you have is a socket head with a metric hex, can't remember the size. I'm not a fan of hexes because there is enough slop to round off easily. Prefer torx for that reason.

Here is what a fillister head looks like. Can be slotted, phillips, torx, posi, whatever...
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:17 PM   #5
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Thanks X1Glider,

The tool marks left from the "Broaching" along with the sloppy fit of the 3mm allen is what had me wondering.

Needing to sometimes use Vicegrips to get them out is inconvenient but the pain begins when none of the BMW dealers keep replacements in stock and I have to wait a week for them to arrive and thendrive between 100 and 200 miles to pick them up. Guess I should just keep them in stock myself

Thanks to everyone for the help! My question has been answered.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:25 AM   #6
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You could probably get some replacement bolts (of equivalent grade) with Torx heads from somewhere like McMaster-Carr.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:27 AM   #7
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No reason you have to source them from BMW, especially if they have a quality problem. Any decent hardware store or Lowe's should have a selection of metric hardware. If not; http://www.mcmaster.com/#socket-head-cap-screws/=ovhmgc

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