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Old 10-10-2013, 01:38 PM   #1
pnoman OP
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Burgman gives Flat Stanley a tour of West Virginia

One of our nieces in Wisconsin sent us her Flat Stanley so he could visit West Virginia and come back to tell her about it.
What a great idea for kids to learn about “faraway lands” like WV.
This is a copy of the narrative and photos we sent back for her to show her class.



For those of you not familiar with Flat Stanley:


It is a 1964 children's book.

Stanley Lambchop and his younger brother Arthur are given a big bulletin board by their father to display pictures and posters. He hangs it on the wall over Stanley's bed. During the night the board falls from the wall, flattening Stanley in his sleep. He survives and makes the best of his altered state, and soon he is entering locked rooms by sliding under the door, and playing with his younger brother by being used as a kite. One special advantage is that Flat Stanley can now visit his friends by being mailed in an envelope. Stanley even helps catch some art museum thieves by posing as a painting on the wall. Eventually, Stanley is tired of being flat and Arthur changes him back to his proper shape with a bicycle pump.


https://www.flatstanley.com/about





We only had a couple of days, so I took a day off work to ride over to the eastern panhandle of West Virginia as part of his tour. Here goes!








Flat Stanley is wearing his helmet for the ride. ATGATT! (All The Gear All The Time)








Stanley has a great view of the ride clipped on the side of the windshield.
(Actually, I removed him while riding)








Our first stop was less than a mile from home. There is a statue of General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson in front of the court house in Clarksburg WV. He was born here. The sign on the next photo explains.






The story of General “Stonewall” Jackson.






Our next stop was the birthplace of Anna Jarvis. It was her idea to create Mothers’ Day.






Anna Jarvis’ house from across the road.








This one-room schoolhouse was moved from its original location in nearby Volga, near Audra State Park. It is now located on the campus of Alderson-Broaddus College in Philippi.
One of the students who attended this school, Arch Hall, later
became a medical doctor. Dr Hall was the surgeon who performed the first
open-heart surgery in the United States!




Ringing the school bell at Campbell School.






Just down the road is the Philippi Covered Bridge. It is one of West Virginia’s most famous landmarks.
This is also where the first land battle of the Civil War was fought.






Flat Stanley checking out the covered bridge at Philippi.






View from the other side of the river.






Stanley wanted to look inside the covered bridge.
There was a big fire about 25 years ago and much of the bridge burned. Lots of people worked hard to rebuild the bridge to look just like it did before the fire. They did a great job!






Another sign telling us about the first land battle of the Civil War fought here at Philippi.








Then, it was time to head into the mountains.
Along the top of many mountains there are these huge wind-powered generators. They make electricity for thousands of homes and create no pollution. Nice!They are as tall as about 5 telephone poles stacked on top of each other.











Sorry, Stanley, this is as close as we are allowed to get.








Our next stop was Blackwater Falls State Park in Davis WV.
The water is dark in color from all of the pine trees that are along the river. The pine needles turn the water “black”.
You can see some of the darker water in the middle part of the falls.









Flat Stanley at Blackwater Falls.








Next, we headed east over the Allegheny Mountains. At the top of the mountain is this sign.
Rain water that falls on one side of the mountain ends up in the Atlantic Ocean.
Rain water that falls on the other side of the mountain ends up in the Gulf of Mexico.
That’s why they call it the Easter Continental Divide. There is also a Western Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains.






Since Flat Stanley is from Wisconsin dairy country, he wanted to meet some of the locals.
I think they were all curious to meet each other.



PART II - Coming Soon

pnoman screwed with this post 10-10-2013 at 02:31 PM
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Old 10-10-2013, 01:50 PM   #2
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Part II

PART II



About 10 miles east of the Eastern Continental Divide, Seneca Rocks sprouts from the mountain top
like fins on the back of a fish. Like the Covered Bridge at Philippi,
Seneca Rocks is one of the places most West Virginians recognize.



The rocks are nearly a mile away! They are about 900 feet high – that’s 6 times taller than the Statue of Liberty!
There is a long path that zigzags up the mountain and ends at an overlook platform. Great view from up there!



Little closer view of Seneca Rocks.




After Seneca Rocks, it was time to head to the “Top of West Virginia”
To get to Spruce Knob, you must first ride up a narrow road with lots of curves.
Motorcycle riders like these kinds of roads. Stanley was going “Whoo-Hooo” all the way up!




Here we are at the top of Spruce Knob, the highest point in West Virginia.
We are 4,863 feet above sea level – almost 1 whole mile!



Flat Stanley at Spruce Knob.




Stanley enjoying the view from the Spruce Knob parking lot.
On a clear day like today, you can see about 50 or 60 miles!



Time to ride down from Spruce Knob. That was fun!




Our next stop was a scenic overlook that is one of Mister Mike’s favorites – Germany Valley.
A nice lady took our picture.




There were lots of Indians in Germany Valley long ago.




One more look out over Germany Valley and the nice farms before we go.




The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a cool place to discover space in Green Bank, WV.
Instead of looking for planets with our eyes, these giant telescopes “listen” for certain sounds
like radio waves that each planet makes. These are not radio waves with music like we listen to in
the car, though. By studying the radio waves, scientists can “see” the planets just by listening. Wow





Stanley is checking out the main radio telescope at Green Bank. It is over a mile away, and is huge!
See the building just to the left of the telescope and hiding behind a couple of trees?
That building is larger than even a big dairy barn!







There is a nice country road nearby with great views of the telescopes.
You can see some of the other smaller telescopes in this photo.






I hear a train whistle!
Not too far from Green Bank is the Cass Scenic Railroad.
These old trains once carried cut trees out of the woods so people could make houses and furniture.
Now they carry visitors up and down the mountain to enjoy the views.






Here is a story about the town of Cass.
Stanley is learning a lot of interesting history today!





Here are some of the houses the workers lived in.





As we looped around and started on our way home, Stanley suddenly shouted, “Who’s that?”
We stopped to visit Minnehaha (pronounced “mini-ha-ha”)
She is wife of the famous Indian Hiawatha.
There is a small town in West Virginia named Minnehaha. What do you think a person from that town would be called?














Our last stop of the day was Jackson’s Mill. Remember “Stonewall” Jackson from the first photos?
Well, he lived here when he was young.
There is now a 4H camp here. It was the first State 4H Camp in the United States!






West Virginia University now runs part of the 4H camp.




Some of the places for visitors to stay at Jackson’s Mill 4H Camp. Nice!




Peek-a-boo! Stanley was looking out over the Jackson’s Mill 4H Camp.

It is time to go home now. Hope you enjoyed riding with us.



*** Later in the week, I took Stanley to Morgantown in my car to tour WVU, and my wife took him to Charleston to visit the capitol building.


pnoman screwed with this post 10-10-2013 at 02:29 PM
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Old 10-10-2013, 03:19 PM   #3
BerndM
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Thanks pnoman, for all the great pics especially with all the interesting historical signs.
A sort of pictorial history lesson.

Your pics have raised a question for you though....

I need to know about the driver's backrest you have and what you think of it? Where did you get it etc etc......

The bike is a 650 right?

Thanks
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Old 10-10-2013, 03:26 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BerndM View Post
Thanks pnoman, for all the great pics especially with all the interesting historical signs.
A sort of pictorial history lesson.

Your pics have raised a question for you though....

I need to know about the driver's backrest you have and what you think of it? Where did you get it etc etc......

The bike is a 650 right?

Thanks
Thanks for the comments. I love sharing history and interesting places with everyone, especially younger folks.

The backrest came with the bike (yes, a 650) - bought used in July this year and I've already put over 3,300 miles on it. The PO made the "adapter" out of a piece of wood sort of shaped like an upside down "U". He took the mounting plate for the backrest and basically traced it twice on this piece of wood, then drilled holes to match up. He did have to get longer bolts for the top. If you want, I can try to take some photos close up and PM you. Also you can go over to the BurgmanUSA forum and there are threads there with better descriptions than what I just gave you.
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Old 10-10-2013, 04:23 PM   #5
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Very cool ride report. I love the history of the East side of the country. The covered bridge is a must see.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:51 AM   #6
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Flat Stanley really gets around. He had an excellent tour guide.
Thanks for taking us along.

We did that for our grandson and had more fun than mature adults are supposed to have!
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Old 10-11-2013, 02:28 PM   #7
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Was not familiar with Flat Stanley until today. I must say I enjoyed watching you and Flat Stanley traveling West Virginia. Thank you for sharing.

Namaste'
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Old 10-11-2013, 07:02 PM   #8
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Thanks for the info on the backrest pnoman. I will go to the Burgman forum and check it out!
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Old 10-13-2013, 02:34 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by BerndM View Post
Thanks for the info on the backrest pnoman. I will go to the Burgman forum and check it out!

PM'd you a link.
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:05 AM   #10
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Wow. What an excellent idea! Well done, to you and whoever thought it up. What a great way to teach kids. Thank you for doing this and for sharing it here.

Respect
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:15 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott_F View Post
Wow. What an excellent idea! Well done, to you and whoever thought it up. What a great way to teach kids. Thank you for doing this and for sharing it here.
I thought the same thing. :)
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