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Old 10-25-2013, 06:35 AM   #16
Farmwalker OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travlr_45 View Post
1 thing that took an untold # of hours, I used a 22 cal. pistol cleaning rod with several brash brushes to clean all the cooling fins on the block.
The last couple of days I have been brainstorming ways to clean that engine, and this sounds like a great idea. I also stumbled onto the Macgyver tips/tricks thread. I think it was in there somewhere that you can cut a q-tip in half and the hollow shaft fits perfectly onto coat hanger wire. Instant long reach q-tip. What did you use for a cleaning agent on the engine?

DADODIRT, I like the look of older airheads, but I'm too young to have the budget I would need to restore it properly. Heck, if I had a bigger budget on this Honda I would be doing the whole powder coat thing. Right now I just want to stop the rust and ride it. Maybe down the road quite a few years when my cheap paint needs redone it will get a better treatment.
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Old 10-25-2013, 04:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmwalker View Post
The last couple of days I have been brainstorming ways to clean that engine, and this sounds like a great idea. I also stumbled onto the Macgyver tips/tricks thread. I think it was in there somewhere that you can cut a q-tip in half and the hollow shaft fits perfectly onto coat hanger wire. Instant long reach q-tip. What did you use for a cleaning agent on the engine?

DADODIRT, I like the look of older airheads, but I'm too young to have the budget I would need to restore it properly. Heck, if I had a bigger budget on this Honda I would be doing the whole powder coat thing. Right now I just want to stop the rust and ride it. Maybe down the road quite a few years when my cheap paint needs redone it will get a better treatment.
I used the brass brushes that came in the cleaning kit ( had to buy a few extra to finish) along with a jar of " mothers polishing cream " and a LOT of elbow grease. ..... Regarding the paint, try looking up a guy in W VA. by the name of Mark Byrd. He completely restored the paint on my 450 to factory scheme. Did an excellent job, about $650.00 with shipping both ways from south ga.

P. M. Me an email address, I'll send ya some pics of the 450
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Old 10-30-2013, 09:54 AM   #18
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I was cleaning a Ducati 750 engine and used these brushes. Not cheap, but really work well. I used the brushes and kerosene, along with a lot of hours, but it really turned out well.

http://www.machinerycleanery.com/BrushInfo.htm
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:10 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmwalker View Post
The last couple of days I have been brainstorming ways to clean that engine, and this sounds like a great idea. I also stumbled onto the Macgyver tips/tricks thread. I think it was in there somewhere that you can cut a q-tip in half and the hollow shaft fits perfectly onto coat hanger wire. Instant long reach q-tip. What did you use for a cleaning agent on the engine?

DADODIRT, I like the look of older airheads, but I'm too young to have the budget I would need to restore it properly. Heck, if I had a bigger budget on this Honda I would be doing the whole powder coat thing. Right now I just want to stop the rust and ride it. Maybe down the road quite a few years when my cheap paint needs redone it will get a better treatment.
I have found that when dealing with little rust pits in the chrome, just picking the rust out of them is a good first step. A dental pick or even the sharp tip of a utility blade from a utility knife can do wonders. Sounds crazy,but it works. Picking out is not for the tiny little pits that will come out with oooo steel wool-- maybe start it for areas of 1/8th" or so.
A good example of this is a nice 40 year old exhaust that had rust blooming out of a spot weld. After softening the rusty spot with PB or something for a few hours,the rust picked out of it pretty easily and the surrounding area was saved from damage.
A can of aluminum roof paint always has some settled aluminum paste in the bottom of the can. Wiping that into the pits is not permanent, but it can improve the appearance and add some degree of protection.
You have a cool bike. I just found a 1970 CL350 and it is cleaning up pretty well. Just gonna fix the appearance stuff what I can without tearing the bike apart.

arcanum screwed with this post 10-30-2013 at 10:26 PM
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Old 10-31-2013, 12:22 PM   #20
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Thanks Peashooter and arcanum for the tips. Sorry all that I haven't had an update in a while, been busy with several projects around the house. I have gotten all of the parts in that I ordered last week. Once I am done building a desk I will put some more time into this project, should be this weekend.

Tuesday night I tore down the forks to replace the seals and found quite a bit of rust and pitting. I need to check closer but I think it is all above the travel area for the seal.

Any specific tool suggestions for buffing up the fork lowers and wheel hubs? This weekend I will try to do the forks, rebuild wheels, and build a new battery compartment.
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Old 11-05-2013, 06:54 AM   #21
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Ok, finally some time for more pictures. I had some time to work this weekend and am working this week as well.

I tore down the forks to replace leaking seals and found rust.


On closer inspection, I noticed a hard line in where the fork tube had rusted about 1" above where the fork seal will slide. Only the bottom of the tube is coated. Since the rust was above this, I just took some emery cloth and cleaned them up. The parts fiche exploded view of these forks is confusing, so here is a layout of all the parts. (Note: I have the fork boot upside down in the picture. The end with the silver ring should be to the right. )


Went to reassemble the forks.... wrong size fork seals... guess I will be waiting on the new ones to get here first.

The next order of business was mounting up the new battery. (Old, meet new)


I'm not sure if this dinky battery will run the starter well, but it can handle all of the other functions just fine. I only got the smaller one for looks since I will be running without side covers. I want to mount it something like this...


This should hold it...



I also started pulling apart other small items that need paint and tore down the wheels. Here are my spoke pattern reference pictures.



I am working on getting the new mufflers on the exhaust now.
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:52 PM   #22
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Just got the old mufflers off, pipes modified, and new mufflers mocked up.


Not bad eh? Should probably figure out a heat shield so my beautiful passenger doesn't get burns on those mufflers. That wouldn't be good
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:18 AM   #23
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Wow, it has been a while since I have updated this. I have been working on the bike. Things are moving along nicely and I am getting close to painting parts.

The new battery compartment is finished up with mounts for the new rectifier/regulator and starter relay.


Next item was the gas tank. It seems this bike has spent some time sitting in the sun and weather.


I started by only removing the rust spots. I had a feeling it would come out looking a bit like a leopard, but not this bad.


I guess I will try to blend the spots together and go for a weathered look.

I guess this would be ok if I wanted a rat bike...

But I'm not, so all the paint came off.

I'm going to go through a couple stages of sanding to get a uniform texture and clear coat instead of painting.

There was a bunch of rust on the exhaust pipes, so I cleaned them up and painted them.

I might leave the heat shield chrome, but the jury is out on this still.

Next up was some more welding. I had read around on hondatwins and found that guys were welding the seams on the frame that are only spot welded for more strength. Makes sense to me.

Since I would like to do some off-road with this, a little extra frame strength is nice piece of mind.
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Old 11-22-2013, 09:54 AM   #24
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The rear wheel bearings felt rough so they needed replacing. I referenced my Haynes manual for this, and it had all of 3 steps and not much detail...I will try to provide a little more insight into the process.
First up is unlocking the bearing retainer. There will be one or more notches hammered into the edge to lock it.


The manual says to drill this out with a 1/4" drill bit.


Next is unscrewing the retainer. The manual said this has left-handed threads. This is WRONG, I naturally turned it counter-clockwise without thinking and it unscrewed, right-hand threads. They also show having a special tool for unscrewing it.

Mine was barely snug and no problem to remove using two punches as handles.

Next is driving out the bearings. I recommend driving the BRAKE side bearing out FIRST. Use a long punch and push the spacer tube inside the hub to the side. You will only be able to hit the inner race, which will ruin the bearing. Push the spacer around and work side to side on the bearing until it comes out. Hitting the bearing in the same spot might get it to move a little, but then it will just wedge. Don't worry about damaging the bearing, if you are taking them out they are junk already. With that bearing out, flip the hub over and take out the spacer. Now you have access to the outer race of the sprocket side bearing. Be careful not not drive your punch into the wall of the hub casting, it will leave a nasty mark that will need cleaned up before the new bearing can go in.

This bushing is on the inside of the sprocket side bearing with the shoulder covering the inside of the inner race. Driving the sprocket side bearing out first would demolish this bushing. Also, remember to save this bushing to put in the new bearing. I'm not sure anyone makes these anymore so a new one might be hard to find.


I had previously check the steering head bearings and they felt fine, but when I was welding the frame I noticed the nut on the stem was loose. So I tightened it and they felt awful. Out of curiosity I took the nut off and started to pull the stem off. Which is when I remembered these are loose roller bearings as they go dancing across the floor
And then chunks of rust started falling out
Guess I am replacing those now too. Might as well get new front wheel bearings since I am paying for the shipping...
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Old 12-12-2013, 06:21 AM   #25
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I have a similar bike, no RHS panel badge though, Got one? I have mine in dry dock at the moment, spat the little clutch pushrod seal, waiting for that part is getting a bit old.
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Old 12-12-2013, 08:20 AM   #26
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That is an incredibly clean bike. And it looks like your mufflers aren't rusted out, which is very rare. Your pictures show the LH badge clearly so I will check mine to see if they match.

Also, I am still working on this bike. Just haven't updated this thread in a while. The tank is now clear coated and a bunch of the small parts have been painted. I doubt the frame will be painted before Christmas. Shortly after the holidays I want to finish paint and start reassembling the bike.
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:04 AM   #27
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Wow, it has been quite a while since I have posted any progress on this. The Thanksgiving through Christmas stretch was busy but I was able to work little by little on this. First off, I got the gas tank to something I am content with.


The clear coat didn't come out perfect so that might get redone down the road. Next up I cleaned and painted all of the bolt on parts.


Last night I had a full evening to devote to cleaning and priming the frame. Over the next couple of nights I will finish painting it. I have also attempted to paint the rims black, but chrome is apparently very good at repelling paint. I sanded them down and cleaned them very carefully but it still hasn't worked. Going to try those again this weekend, Then I can start working on getting a rolling chassis put together!
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Old 01-14-2014, 07:15 PM   #28
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Check it out, a painted frame with parts back on it!


I think I am officially done painting parts, unless I find some small parts during assembly that I missed. I also managed to get the wheels put back together and have the front running true. This takes quite a bit of patience and some guessing without having a proper stand...

I had never re-spoked a wheel. It seemed daunting until I figured out the pattern.

One of the next major parts is getting the steering stem back together. I froze the outer races and they were easy to get into the frame. The stem is now in the freezer and the lower taper bearing will go in the oven so I can press/hammer it onto the stem. Hopefully that won't be too much of an adventure...
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Old 01-19-2014, 04:39 PM   #29
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Looking good. Always wanted a CL 350 or 450....sigh
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Old 01-19-2014, 06:48 PM   #30
travlr_45
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Originally Posted by toastmuncher View Post




I have a similar bike, no RHS panel badge though, Got one? I have mine in dry dock at the moment, spat the little clutch pushrod seal, waiting for that part is getting a bit old.

That's a great looking 350. Also noticed the BCR sitting beside it, I have the same bike, except mine is the 05 model. ( last year for that version)
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