ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-03-2013, 07:35 PM   #16
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
New Pics

New pics here!

http://s1283.photobucket.com/user/cm...?sort=3&page=1
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493

cmkaduce screwed with this post 11-03-2013 at 07:37 PM Reason: Bad link
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 11:59 PM   #17
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Big Sur

Sunday was a much needed day of recovery. I grab dinner at a thai place with two other travelers Iím sharing a room with at the hostel. One is an 18 year-old dude from the Netherlands exploring the Western United States. The other is a graduate student from Atlanta of all places. I lived in Atlanta 7 years. It was fun to meet someone that literally lived down the road about 2 miles from me when I lived in ATL. Itís so interesting the diversity of the people you meet on the road. Everyone writing their own story as they go along.
I say goodbye to the hostel dudes and Iím on the road again Monday morning. I quickly realize my Garmin is damn near as useless as a rubber at a sausage fest with all the interference from the San Francisco buildings. I eventually find my way to highway 1 and begin making my way south. Outside of high winds, the day is gorgeous. The sun is shining, Iím recovered, the KLR is still slow but is running well, all is A-OK in my little bubble. I jam to some tunes and practice a little Spanish through my earbuds while enjoying the utterly breathtaking views along PCH. I make it to Big Sur and stay at the Plaskett Creek campground. After setting up camp, I make my way to the very edge of the rocky shore. At least a 40 foot drop below, I sit perched on a rock that has existed longer than my simple mind can comprehend. I stay in this place for more than an hour listening, observing, and thinking. Pondering life and appreciating natureís pure unfiltered beauty, I realize what a magnificent place this is. This is a place you can get lost in and find yourself at the same time. As the cool pacific salt water crashes continuously in the background, I watch as the sun gradually moves over the water. I take in a deep breath without knowing when I will have the opportunity to experience this place again. Putting yourself in the middle of these truly remarkable places is in my opinion the best reminder of how important it is to respect our environment and make conscious decisions to move in the direction of sustainability. When my travels are complete, I have a strong desire to give back to the environment I have relentlessly plundered for so long.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 03:44 PM   #18
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
What About Bob?

It was a cold night at Big Sur but the morning sunshine brought almost immediate warmth. I was able to meet up with Bob who is a semi-retired campground manager for the parks system. I met Bob on my previous expedition on the KLR across North America. Bob sold his KLR and bought a new V-Strom leaving all sorts of KLR parts left lying around. We talked a bit about the ethanol in fuel and how it was more than likely the culprit for my diaphragm failure during this past trip. Turns out Bob had already fabricated his own solution to this problem by bypassing the diaphragm altogether. Bob gave me this part along with a spare petcock just in case I run into trouble on this trip. Thanks Bob!!
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 03:54 PM   #19
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Fragility

I continue along Highway 1 taking in the views of coastline, Elephant Seals, Zebras, and farmland as I make my way from Big Sur to Santa Barbara. I plan on staying with friends living in Hermosa Beach so I find I have a couple hours to kill before they will be around. I decide to stop in to the Brewhouse in Santa Barbara and end up striking up a conversation with a guy in his early to mid-50s named Glenn. Glenn kind of has the ďmost interesting man in the worldĒ look going for him and Iím guessing it works pretty well. Before you know it, Glennís buddy Rob shows up on a Duc so we end up talking about everything from bikes to evil corporations. Instead of having 1 beer for an hour, I consume 3 in 3 hours and have dinner in that time as well. Iím having a great time but realize I need to be on my way to Hermosa Beach. I swap the tinted visor for the clear one and attempt to mount the bike. Failure! As I grab the handlebar, throw my leg over, and yell ďadiosĒ to my newly found friends the bike begins to topple towards me and I canít save it. Crash, the bike is on the ground and the mirror is broken off. Damn, havenít left the states yet and already the bike is down. This is why Cody canít have nice things. So, Glenn helps me pickup the bike and while Iím a bit embarrassed I canít help but smile a bit in spite of this turn of events. This very thing almost happened to me a couple other times on the trip. The bike is pretty unbalanced with all the weight in the rear. So, if you take this and add to the fact that Iím short at 5-8 leads to a bit of a challenging mount (the half a beer still in my system probably didnít help with reaction times either).

After making attempt 2 at mounting the KLRÖthis time successful, I had a 100 mile trip ahead of me from Santa Barbara to Hermosa Beach (with one rear view mirror). During these 100 miles, I began to look at what had just transpired. I have close to 150,000 miles on motorcycles of which +100,000 are on sport bikes. No matter the level of experience, skill, aptitude, knowledge, etc. this little mishap really started to put things into perspective. You are not invincible. You are embarking on something that is incredibly dangerous. The slightest miscalculation can result in devastating consequences, either caused by myself or someone else. For the first time, a flood of anxiety and concern flows through me as the true inherent danger of this trip begins to settle in. Iím sure we all have these moments. We have planned something, though about it, think weíre ready, and then something comes over you that makes you feel in a way you hadnít quite anticipated. While I am still very much looking forward to leaving North America, a part of me is certainly shouting warning signs. The bottom line is, I need to be more cautious, especially as I leave the states. Take risks, but take them calculated and in moderation. When there is no woman around helping call the shots, often times moderation isnít in a single manís vocabulary. Seems I may need to expand my vocabulary to include the word.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:24 AM   #20
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Hermosa Beach

Back in my college days, there was a guy so into sport bikes that he created ďMankato Sportbike AssociationĒ to connect a local riding group of sport bike enthusiasts. I still remember the flyer that appeared on my motorcycle after class. I called the number and was connected with this fellow named Jeff. From that point forward, Jeff and I became friends, rode together often, and stayed in touch over the years. Jeff also introduced me to this guy Lupe that I was really unsure about at first. Lupe, like any fungus, gradually begins to grow on you. Lupe and Jeff were old roommates and now live together in Hermosa Beach. Jeff landed a job in Torrance and relocated from MN to Hermosa Beach several years ago. Another MN boy, Brandon, also flew in for the weekend to hang out. I had a great time staying with these guys. We took a stroll down Venice Beach. It was good to see Venice Beach once, but is probably not a place I will go again. It is insanely crowded and touristy although I did think the ďmedical marijuana doctorsĒ with their white overcoats were pretty funny offering evaluations on the cheap. We also went north of LA to the Gorman OHV area to have some good fun in Lupeís jeep. There are some great trails out there and seeing all the dirt bikes really made me want my moto for the weekend. Oh well, Iím sure I will get my fill of dirt throughout my trip. I was glad I also had the opportunity to meet up with a friend I met along the way on my previous trip out west. Her name is Roop and she is way cool. We had lunch together at a local Mexican place known for fish/seafood tacos. Maybe someday Iíll take her for a ride on the KLR but my few days in LA are pretty well spoken for this time around. On Saturday night, Brandon, Lupe, and I caught a concert in Costa Mesa at Detroit Bar. We saw Goldroom out of LA play live with a band and the show was excellent. The crowd was fun and energetic. It was pretty cool to see everyone around you really getting into the music that is rather obscure when speaking in terms of the general US populationís taste in music. On Sunday, Lupe thought it would be a good idea for us all to relax and unwind. What better way to do this than with a ďnon-therapeuticĒ massage. None of us have ever had one of these massages before and I was a bit uneasy about it; however, I certainly wasnít adverse to trying it. So, we search online and end up at CraigslistÖyeah Craigslist. Lupe calls an ad and it sounds like the real deal so we are on our way to getÖwell to get the kinks worked out I suppose you might say. We arrive at the place and all four of us walk inside. It was dimly lit with a curtain in the hallway leading to the back. There is a window where you pay and an older Asian woman slides the window open letting us know there is only one masseuse on staff. We have a quick huddle and Lupe decides to journey in while the rest of us grab a cup of joe. 25 minutes go by and we hear back from Lupe. Letís just say he is very relaxed but the price was a bit more than expected. After careful thought and deliberation I decided it probably isnít the best idea to be spending money on that sort of thing at this point knowing I have a long journey ahead of me that Iím sure will be fraught with unanticipated expenses.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:25 AM   #21
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
San Diego

Upon arrival in San Diego, I decide to service the bike. I stop into OíReilly auto parts, buy some oil, and change it in the parking lot. I must have looked a little homely outside the auto parts store dropping the oil because a bread truck came by and decided to give me some free bagels. I then make my way over to GP Motorcycles and hand them my rim to have a new rear tire mounted before Baja. I just wasnít certain my rear was going to get me all the way to La Paz, so best to change it I suppose. After getting the tire done, I make my way to the Museum of Man in Balboa Park. I take in the special exhibit called Beerology. This is my kind of exhibit. The exhibit talks about beerís role in taking man from hunter/gatherer to growing, harvesting, and caring for crops. There were growlers and other ancient artifacts on display along with a good deal of literature talking about ingredients, brewing traditions, and processes used across the globe. After the exhibit, I figure I better make a stop at Karl Strauss brewing downtown for a pint or two where I have a great conversation with Roger who lives locally and has done some traveling to Mexico for work. The following day I venture to Point Loma for a few photos and then ride up to Ocean Beach. I grab a few tasty fish tacos at JVís Mexican before heading up to La Jolla Cove where I was treated to the sight of several dozen sea lions basking in the sun. I backtrack to Ocean Beach to catch the sunset and walk through the farmers market. I decide to eat Pho and end up having a pretty interesting conversation with a dude trying to sell me on Buddhism. After this little spiritual discussion, I stop into a bar for happy hour grabbing a pint of a local IPA while jamming out to some Blondie, Fleetwood Mac, and Phil Collins on the jukebox.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:28 AM   #22
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
The Crossing

Waking up for my last day in San Diego I took some time for reflection. I stared at the door for about 10 minutes with a bit of nervousness trembling through me as I realize all that is foreign lies beyond that door and a few miles down the interstate. Crossing into Mexico through Tijuana was no issue (at least I thought so at first). I was waved right on through and never set a foot down. After crossing, I look around and quickly understand that the line between a poor country and a wealthy one couldnít be more prevalent than in this moment. I make my way taking the scenic toll highway to Ensenada. The traffic intersections are nuts. There are so many intersections with tiny ďALTOĒ signs and you arenít even sure if it is a four-way unless you look to see if the crossing traffic has the same small sign. Everyone rolls these signsÖthey are really more like yield signs. I head through the center of the city and quickly begin to filter through traffic as the congestion increases. I look at my GPS and find a motel about a mile away from the Baja 1000 start/finish. I greet the friendly staff who speaks as much English as I speak SpanishÖbasically none. They tell me the stay for four nights is $200 USD. Iím thinking shit this is Mexico, it must be cheaper than this. I attempt to offer $150 for four nights but they misunderstand thinking I now only want three nights. Now they are writing the days on a piece of paperÖ.jueves, viernes, sabado. I finally after a long ordeal (my fault entirely Ė Spanish is the language here and I donít know it) get my point across that Iím making a counter-offer. They tell me no the rate is what it is so I tell them Iíll think it over. I talk to a few Baja guys who are staying at the motel to see if they know of a better deal. As they are talking with me, the ladies from the motel come back over and hand me the phone. Apparently, they called the owner who has a sister motel just down the road that she will let me have for $150 (4 nights this time). Rather than attempting to give the super gringo directions, they just tell me to follow them to the motel. I follow them and turns out it isnít a bad place and it even has wi-fi. Very nice folks at this motel.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:33 AM   #23
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Baja 1000

I walk from my motel to the Baja 1000 gates. It is absolute chaos. There are people everywhere and all I hear is a slur of Spanish in every direction of which I understand hardly any of it. I get there in time to see the trophy trucks going through registration. The crowd is so thick in spots that I can only relate it to the 405 at rush hourÖfull on gridlock. There are vendors lined along the path near the gate offering all sorts of delicious and terribly unhealthy food options from greasy tacos to churros. The tacos here are the best Iíve ever had and I fear Iíll be a fat bastard in no time if I hang out too long. The beer is only slightly higher than the price of bottled water, so yeah, Iíve been drinking a bit. The bad newsÖyour choices are Tecate or Coors (for the Americans I suppose). I prefer Tecate if those are my options. As I meander around for a couple hours I begin to realize that there are no programs, posters, flyers, etc. with any information. The bikes are supposed to start at 11:00 but I look online and the countdown has it starting at 9:00. Further, I havenít seen one motorcycle yet. I grab the GPS file from the Score website and see that the map is actually showing the start as being 30 miles outside Ensenada. Iím totally confused and no one can give me positive confirmation. Relying on the course GPS file, I take off after dark to head out to the spot I think the race is starting at. I ride through congested traffic and smog that becomes so thick I can hardly see 8 car lengths in front of me. I make my way out of the city to the twisty highway 3 leading to the GPS track. I arrive at the track and have to pass through a military checkpoint. They wave me through without checking anything. I see some folks setup with camping gear, fires roaring, Tecates being consumed. I ride to a pit and ask one of the guys in exceptionally broken Spanish exactly where the start of the race is. Fortunately for me, the guy speaks English and tells me my motel (back in Ensenada 30 miles away) is a mile from start finish. Ugh dammit. He gives me positive confirmation the race for bikes begins at 11:00 in Ensenada city center. I have a solid 3 hours to get back so I begin my journey on highway 3 back to Ensenada. I have to go back through the military checkpoint. This time, they stop me. He speaks no English. He points to the box on my bike. I open it and he takes one look in with his flashlight and tells me to be on my way. By this time, Iím craving a beer like mad. I get back to the motel, park the bike, walk the mile again back to what I now know is start/finish, and buy a 24 oz Tecate drinking it in about four seconds (maybe a bit longer Ė this isnít college). I buy another and sip on this one a bit slower. After watching a few bikes take off, I venture to a bridge where the bikes descend down into the dry river bed. As Iím approaching, I see a bike go off course. He braked too late and went straight off the curbing into a bunch of jagged rocks still managing to save the bike. Damn, these guys are talented. The crowd thought he was going to eat it, so they had already started to come closer to him. Just as this happens, the rider lets the clutch go and the bike goes braaaaaaap straight into a wheelie directly into the crowd of people. The crowd parted like Moses parting the seas and Iíve never seen anything like it. This crowd is bananas. They will hang out in runoff areas just to get a photograph. Some are even known for attempting to touch a trophy truck passing by at more than 80 mph (or so the stories are told). I watch at this spot long enough for a butter corn vendorÖ.not sure what itís called but it is that literallyÖbutter & corn in a cup. The butter corn vendor decides to try and wheelie his butter corn cart. The cart flips over and hot buttery corn water goes everywhere. Pretty funny until it starts to drain directly on to the race line of the course right where the bikes are braking and turning in. They bring out two flag workers to let the bikes know there is now an obstacle to avoid. Jeeez, this race is unrealÖ.just some buttery corn water on the race line Ė game on. Somewhere between all the racing action, I was able to make my way to Hussongs for a couple beers. It was here that I met Mike who is from California on a BMW. We have a couple beers at Hussongs before making our way back to the course to see the racers trickle in throughout the evening.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:38 AM   #24
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Another Night Out, Another Dance Floor

Iíve watched both the trophy trucks and the motorcycles from several vantage points, so I decided to see what the town of Ensenada has to offer for nightlife. Quite a bit apparently. There is basically a section of town for us gringo folk. The ATMs dispense US dollars, anyone in the service industry speaks English, and the prices quickly become inflated. Itís like a wormhole that takes Dorothy straight back to Kansas. Before going out, I Google a few places and land on one that might be playing some tunes I like. Itís in gringoville but upon arriving I quickly ascertain that Iím the only gringo in the place. I see that they have Heineken. While Iím not normally a Heineken fan, I want something other than Tecate for a change. I order a Heineken and the Spanish speaking bartender says huh?, Heineken, como?, Heineken, no, I point to the Heineken written on the wall as one of the beers available, still confusion, Tecate, si. Oddly enough, after all this, he actually brings me a Heineken. I swear sometimes they are just screwing with me. I make my way to the dance floor. The crowd here is very young. Early 20s at best. They all know the DJ so they chant his name every 5 minutes or so, which is getting a bit old. No one is dancing. There are some dance floor lurkers that take up space but no one really feeling it. What the hell, Iím here. I start getting down but make my way back to the bar after a few tracks are played through. I placed my jacket on a chair earlier in the night and I now see someone appears to have taken a liking to it. I walk over to him and let him know itís mine. Turns out it was the owner just wanting to put it in a better place for me in the DJ booth and he speaks English! His name is Alonso and we talk for awhile. We have very similar taste in music and I complement him on the place he has built. The quaint space is setup well with good sound and an underground feel. The name of the place is Eurobar. Please stop in, have a pint, and say hi to Alonso if you happen to be traveling through. The young crowd starts to get into the music as the night wears on. Before you know it, the dance floor is packed. The DJ is dropping a few familiar tracks and Iím starting to get lost in them. What a great feeling to be able to share an intense vibe with others even in instances where you donít even share the same language. After closing the bar, it is only 2 and Iím not tired. I look around and only Papas & Beer is still open. I decide against that and begin my walk back to the motel. A small Mexican man approaches me and asks me if I want a woman and I politely decline. He continues to walk with me telling me itís free and I just need to tip blah blah blah. I keep telling him no until finally I have to stop walking, look him in the eye (Iím not big but he is smaller) and tell him to turn around. He says ďOK my friendĒ and leaves me alone right about the time a woman grabs my arm and says want a good time honey? I say no, so she tells me to have sex with myself but not so politely and in PERFECT English. I get back to my motel alone without issue. Pretty fun and interesting evening that is for sure.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:43 AM   #25
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Immigration? Customs?

I am damn lucky. Hereís why. I run into this couple Billy & Trisha who have been traveling on their motorcycles for the last 7 years. Theyíre from Australia and yes they do say ďknifeĒ funny. They have traveled all over from Africa to the Middle East to the Americas. They are a wealth of knowledge and have everything down to a science. It is humbling to really understand how much they have seen and done in their travels. Here I am, day 3 outside North America and as green as can be to the world around me. They ask me if I got my immigration and customs paperwork done. I said no, I just rode through the border. Well, turns out should have stopped and completed the FMM tourist card & TVIP customs. Without the tourist card, I would have ridden close to 1,000 miles down the peninsula to La Paz where I would have been told to turn around and go back 1,000 miles to Tijuana to pay a fine and get the paperwork done. Wow, a painful lesson avoided because of these wonderful people I met through dumb luck. I have been talking with them a bit and they are giving me all sorts of pointers. Because of them, Iím pretty sure how I will negotiate the Darien Gap now and they have provided some really good tips, suggestions, and insights that will serve me well in my travels.

I decide to try and find whether the immigration office in Ensenada is open on Sunday. Unlike the states, there is nowhere on the website that lists hours or even an exact address for the immigration office. I just have a general idea of where it is. I ride to the place I think it is and it isnít there. I have to ask in gringlish for help. Donde esta el migracion Senor? He speaks some English fortunately and tells me Iím close. His directions become a bit complicated but I try to follow. I get on my way to where I think I should be going and end up at the gate of a military area where Iím greeted immediately. I again have to ask where the immigration office is and this guy speaks better English. I find it this time just a few blocks away. It is closed today (Sunday) of course, so I figure Iíll come back tomorrow. Then I realize, tomorrow is a Mexican holiday. Crap. Looks like Iíll be spending another night in Ensenada until I can get to the immigration office Tuesday morning.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 12:43 AM   #26
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
New Pics

http://s1283.photobucket.com/user/cm...?sort=3&page=1
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 01:28 AM   #27
Dazn
Adventurer
 
Dazn's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: Atlanta
Oddometer: 99
Awesome man. Can't tell you how much I wish I was there right now. Btw. I've still got to email you the pictures from your chicago visit.

Keep up the posts!!!!!
Dazn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 03:07 PM   #28
kwb210
who just arrived?
 
kwb210's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Washington, the state
Oddometer: 85
Get your papers in La Paz

I think the whole Baja area is a tourist zone, you don't need any import stuff if not leaving the Baja. You should just ride south to La Paz and do the paperwork down there. Less hassle.
I'd also suggest thinking about beer consumption and driving on the public roads, US is tolerant to a point, many other countries no so.
Good luck.
__________________
1977 BMW R100/7
BMW R75/5 Toaster(s) and soon a 1974 R90/6 (multiple boxes)
1960 R50 project
kwb210 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 04:56 PM   #29
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwb210 View Post
I think the whole Baja area is a tourist zone, you don't need any import stuff if not leaving the Baja. You should just ride south to La Paz and do the paperwork down there. Less hassle.
I'd also suggest thinking about beer consumption and driving on the public roads, US is tolerant to a point, many other countries no so.
Good luck.
Thanks - I think I'm going to head to Tecate in the morning and get both immigration and customs sorted then. I just don't want to risk it. I hear they are only issuing the FMM at border crossings and there is a guy that had to go all the way back to TJ from La Paz to get it. It isn't that far backtracking from Ensenada, so looks like I'll get to see Tecate tomorrow.
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2013, 04:57 PM   #30
cmkaduce OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
cmkaduce's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazn View Post
I've still got to email you the pictures from your chicago visit.
Yes, I want to see those!
__________________
Parabellum Windshields
Bel-Ray Lubricants
EBC Brakes
MN Buildings & Equipment; Kaduce Tire

The Minnesota Boy Heads South --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928493
cmkaduce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014