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Old 10-25-2013, 08:51 PM   #16
QSrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cogswell View Post
Find some of these...




Mike

I had a shop use that on one of my tire. It was almost new and they didn't have mine in stock... I was in the middle of a longer trip and couldn't really wait 3 days. Initially put it on to go to the next shop. Ended up finishing the trip (2000+ miles). Didn't loose a pound. I probably could have left the tire longer and be fine... But decided to play it safe and changed it when I got home.
That plug was put on so well I couldn't catch its edge to pull it off. After messing with it for a while I was convinced that the plug would have been fine for the rest of the life of the tire.
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Old 10-26-2013, 07:13 AM   #17
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^^^ Those plug/patch. Nothing that new about them I used similar back in the days when I was the tire jockey.

Had to practice with them recently just in case I have to DIY on the road, lots of shops won't touch motorcycle tires. Mainly in the more litigious countries, not so much in Canada my local shop will install such patches IF you bring them the tire. They did for me on a new Blizzak so I got to watch and see if the techniques had changed in 40 years.....they haven't.

I also practiced with the string plugs, funny how easy some of them can be to pull out after installation, all depends on the size of the hole I guess but I sure wouldn't trust them on my bike as a long term repair. Mind you trust is relative to riding conditions.They may never fail for you....
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Old 10-26-2013, 11:50 AM   #18
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So I stopped by the local NAPA this AM and picked this up:



The offending nail:



The hole to be patched:;



Patch installed:



Outside view of the end of the plug:



Used para cord to reinstall tire:



All put back together:



I used WD40 as tire lube - it worked great.

So far, so good. Took a short test ride and it hasn't gone flat yet....
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Old 10-27-2013, 03:28 PM   #19
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Now that you've got the tire off the rim... you go buy another tire

I'd patch a dirt bike tire, but never ever trust a patch on a tire that will be seeing 70mph +. On a car, yes. On a motorcycle, where ONE tire failure could easily kill you? No thanks. I know lots of people have had luck with this, but to me, that's akin to zip-tying your handlebars onto the forks.
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Old 10-27-2013, 08:17 PM   #20
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Stop 'n Go



I use this on both the cars and the motorcycle, no need to remove the tire, the goo strings are good too, the Stop 'n Go has a mushroom head that helps seal and retain it in the tire.

I have used the goo strings and the mushrooms and had no problems.
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Old 10-28-2013, 08:26 AM   #21
Boatman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MiteyF View Post
Now that you've got the tire off the rim... you go buy another tire

I'd patch a dirt bike tire, but never ever trust a patch on a tire that will be seeing 70mph +. On a car, yes. On a motorcycle, where ONE tire failure could easily kill you? No thanks. I know lots of people have had luck with this, but to me, that's akin to zip-tying your handlebars onto the forks.



That's like stating,,, if you don't use a new crush washer on the drain plug every time you change the oil, you might as well not put any oil in the engine.

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Old 10-28-2013, 08:58 AM   #22
larryboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingoff View Post
Question
I have never heard that.
I usually plug the tyre on the road.
When I get home take the wheel off.
Take to bike shop
Get a inside plug put in.
Please
Enlighten me.
I do sometimes travel at very high speeds.
Cheers

The tire is too thin, I've had problems with ZR rated car tires too..we grind/buff the rubber to give an inside patch something to adhere to and the metal is just barely under the surface. A plug from the outside that self vulcanizes is the best option for a tubeless motorcycle tire.

Notice in the following pictures, the alligator skin looking bumps needed to be ground smooth in an area bigger than the patch. If you try to do that you're right into the metal, the tire is too thin. The only upside to this repair is that there is a plug of sorts holding the patch over the hole and hopefully it won't slip and expose the hole.

I wouldn't trust my life to that one.

YMMV

Quote:
Originally Posted by tominboise View Post
The hole to be patched:;



Patch installed:


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Old 10-28-2013, 11:47 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boatman View Post


That's like stating,,, if you don't use a new crush washer on the drain plug every time you change the oil, you might as well not put any oil in the engine.

Oil leaks will only kill your bike. Failed tires can (I know, I know, probably won't, but COULD) kill YOU. With that said, I just now (literally 5 minutes ago) used the first new crush washer on my Strom in the last 20k+ miles. It never had one, and never leaked a drop

So no, those 2 statements are NOTHING alike. Nice try though!
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Old 10-28-2013, 03:24 PM   #24
Boatman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MiteyF View Post
Oil leaks will only kill your bike. Failed tires can (I know, I know, probably won't, but COULD) kill YOU. With that said, I just now (literally 5 minutes ago) used the first new crush washer on my Strom in the last 20k+ miles. It never had one, and never leaked a drop

So no, those 2 statements are NOTHING alike. Nice try though!

Loss of engine oil can lead to a seized engine which in turn can lead to the rear wheel locking up causing a crash. Crashes can kill as you already pointed out.

So yes they are alike. Nice try though!
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:59 AM   #25
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I tought I recognized that snakeskin pattern.



Cut out a sample if just to see how much rubber is there before hitting the cords. Looks like 0.7mm, plenty to patch if taking it easy with the power tools when buffing.



I buffed the sample with a power tool. Takes too long to do by hand but shops will want to use the power tool. May depend on the operator as to how much they'll remove. I think that's a worn 50 grit, did the trick with a light hand on the tool.Gotta be quick.



Still plenty of rubber left after buffing, only got rid of the snakeskin for an even adhesion of a patch.



Cords....I think that tire was just about ready to show some on the other side.
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