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Old 11-20-2013, 11:57 AM   #16
jdbalt
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No

If you tried to "loft" your front wheel over that, you would still be there laying in the dirt. Slow down. It is just like over driving your lights at night. If you can't see something in the terrain because of a hill/curve etc. Slow down. That is exactly how I broke my wrist a couple of years ago on a dirt road. Rain had gone through, I came over a rise and it was wet clay. Down I went. And I was warned by a rider in front of me. I just didn't slow down enough.
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Old 11-22-2013, 09:18 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
yeah. being able to wheelie is a key skill, but even more so is riding at a safe speed for the terrain ahead. any A-level enduro rider will tell ya, don't over-ride your braking ability.
I agree panic breaking is very important (and I think your right it would have been more effective in this situation), but I honestly believe that lofting the front wheel correctly is one of the most important skills when riding anything at speed, especially in the desert. Remember the line "when in doubt gas it" If the front wheel clears the chances are the bike will follow through as long as you have a good body position relative to the situation. This is talking about a true dirt bike, not bigger DS bikes where your asking for a horrific crash.....

I really dont know of any fast rider that can honestly say they always ride at a pace where they could stop in time for ANY unforseen obstacle, ie g-outs/washed out area, logs around a corner, etc. The mark of a skilled rider is being able to use many other techniques when another alternative (ie stopping) is not an option. BTW Im not saying it is not safer to go slow, it clearly is, but I'm sure most of us do this sport for many individual reasons and safety is probably not in the top 3

For what its worth just a few points of advice to the OP when practicing "lofting". I would not suggest throwing your weight over the handle bars and backing off the throttle (trials style) once the front wheel is over the obstacle, I promise you have a good chance of getting bucked off for anything not in 1st gear

Keep it simple...............
-Think about a doing a power wheelie with the goal being to un-weight the front (0-15in).
-Stay on the gas.
-Lean back
-and SQUEEZE the bike with your knees and ankles.

Practice doing short power wheelies in every gear as you're riding along using the above techniques, easy and fun way to learn. Once your comfortable with getting the wheel in the air pick some obstacles that you could normally ride through, like a small ditch, and start riding over the obstacle vs through it.

If you do this you can get through some amazingly tough obstacles and it will really control any bucking action.



Just my opinion, for what its worth.
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Old 11-22-2013, 11:23 AM   #18
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that man speaks the truth!
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Old 11-26-2013, 05:37 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by russbryant View Post
Glad you came out of that relatively unscathed. Looked like a great trail up until your crash. Where is it? Oh, so how did the practice go?
Practice went alright. Buddy and I found a piece of 4x4 in one of the flat openb areas of the trail and we practiced clearing the front wheel over it in 1-3 gears. Kinda tough, timing is everything... and i still have this irrational fear of looping the bike even though bringing the front up 2' is tough (due to me, not the bike obviously).

Quote:
Originally Posted by COXR650L View Post
I agree panic breaking is very important (and I think your right it would have been more effective in this situation), but I honestly believe that lofting the front wheel correctly is one of the most important skills when riding anything at speed, especially in the desert. Remember the line "when in doubt gas it" If the front wheel clears the chances are the bike will follow through as long as you have a good body position relative to the situation. This is talking about a true dirt bike, not bigger DS bikes where your asking for a horrific crash.....
Yeah it was one of those cases where the rut was not obvious until a split second before I hit it. And though those forks are fantastic, the angle and speed and weighting that I hit it at was too much. Though I like to think that they absorbed a lot of the hurt.

Ive since unconsciously slowed down when coming up upon those types of washes, especially after the rains we've had recently where a lot of them have been cut deep due to the flash flooding.

Quote:
I really dont know of any fast rider that can honestly say they always ride at a pace where they could stop in time for ANY unforseen obstacle, ie g-outs/washed out area, logs around a corner, etc. The mark of a skilled rider is being able to use many other techniques when another alternative (ie stopping) is not an option. BTW Im not saying it is not safer to go slow, it clearly is, but I'm sure most of us do this sport for many individual reasons and safety is probably not in the top 3
Agreed. Limits need to be pushed a bit. I was cruising at high speed as you saw, but not flogging the top of 6th gear holy shit speed. More of a comfortable but quick pace. Sometimes you mess up. Sometimes the trail messes you up. Sometimes you get hurt. I didn't in the case and am very thankful. Caution and not taking unnecessary risks is a good thing, but not being SO cautious as to not really get any quicker/better/funner.

Quote:
For what its worth just a few points of advice to the OP when practicing "lofting". I would not suggest throwing your weight over the handle bars and backing off the throttle (trials style) once the front wheel is over the obstacle, I promise you have a good chance of getting bucked off for anything not in 1st gear

Keep it simple...............
-Think about a doing a power wheelie with the goal being to un-weight the front (0-15in).
-Stay on the gas.
-Lean back
-and SQUEEZE the bike with your knees and ankles.

Practice doing short power wheelies in every gear as you're riding along using the above techniques, easy and fun way to learn. Once your comfortable with getting the wheel in the air pick some obstacles that you could normally ride through, like a small ditch, and start riding over the obstacle vs through it.

If you do this you can get through some amazingly tough obstacles and it will really control any bucking action.



Just my opinion, for what its worth.
Yeah, when I did clear that 4x4 with the front wheel, I powered through it with the back. Didn't want to get kicked.

On a different note, here's some video of oh so rare and oh so fun WET desert riding! And i didn't fall at all! Hell, the mud wouldn't let me Right before this video was shot, you don't see that my bike was being held up by the mud... until it eventually sloooowly flopped over. Unfortunately my buddy didn't have the camera rolling as I flailed about in that goose crap to try to pick it up. I'd say it was a solid 18" deep.

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Old 11-26-2013, 05:46 PM   #20
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Practice makes perfect,or at least way better.

Nice Husaberg by the way,I just picked up a 2014 300XCW,nicest dirtbike Ive had so far.

But practicing wheelies some,then practicing wheelies over logs,over small ditches,over rocks,what ever and getting the feel for what happens is the only way to gain confidence.

And then there's reading terrain,there's signs of impending big changes coming up out in the desert,any low spot could have had a small creek rip through and make a ditch,some 4' deep,some could be 20' deep so its really good to look before you leap. Be careful!
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Old 11-30-2013, 04:57 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Foot dragger View Post
Practice makes perfect,or at least way better.

Nice Husaberg by the way,I just picked up a 2014 300XCW,nicest dirtbike Ive had so far.

But practicing wheelies some,then practicing wheelies over logs,over small ditches,over rocks,what ever and getting the feel for what happens is the only way to gain confidence.

And then there's reading terrain,there's signs of impending big changes coming up out in the desert,any low spot could have had a small creek rip through and make a ditch,some 4' deep,some could be 20' deep so its really good to look before you leap. Be careful!
Sure does. Wish i didn't have to work for a livin cause then i'd practice more! As far as the 'berg, yeah. Thing's unreal. Any failures of offroading adventures can be atrributed 100% my fault. There's very little this bike can't do, so it's never the bikes fault when something goes wrong.

Otherwise, yeah, I've been trying to get the practice in while riding. I liked and have taken COX650's advice on doing little power/clutch wheelies whenever while riding to just get the feel for it. As I get better I think i'll be able to loft that front in ever shorter sections of straight trail. Then loft in slick conditions, so on and so forth. Perhaps I'll even be able to get the slow balance point wheelie down someday.

I'm really thrilled about getting back to offroading where one can practice and push limits and learn and crash without getting TOO hurt (hopefully). Street riding.. with the bikes and traffic these days, it's tough to push those limits without losing one's license or life.
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Old 12-10-2013, 12:51 PM   #22
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Am I missing something ?

May be I,m missing something here ..but isnt coming off on dirt all part of trail riding .I couldnt count how many times I have been thrown or come off in the bush and it was all good fun . lol Most times probably was rider error but hey thats dirt bikes. most people seem to push the comfort zone in dirt .[ its inevitable ..guaranteed ] even the best come off on dirt to many variables and the unknown .
skills can be gained for sure but coming off especially on dirt ..all part of dirt bikes.
lifting the front is skill but also getting it down in a hurry or stop yourself from over balancing / [tap the back brake lightly ] while in mid air will do this .180 360 on the spot turns [donuts ] helpful in tight tracks and bit of fun ..using the rear wheel slide to change directions Need to be standing on pegs to do this. good for steep slow descents combining engine drag ..
Balance is most important on any bike but critical on dirt bikes.. good luck ..
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Old 12-11-2013, 02:41 PM   #23
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I don't think falling is the best way to learn. Practicing slowly enough to get and groove the action is the best way, and considerably shortens the learning curve. I personally don't mind trying out new things, but I'm not going to push to beyond my current abilities... I'll be approaching them but not exceeding them. That is how you get better, more quickly. And it saves on the insurance deductibles and bike repair bills, too.
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Old 12-11-2013, 07:59 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by ObiJohn View Post
I don't think falling is the best way to learn.
Common sense comes from experience...
Wisdom comes from bad experience.
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Old 12-13-2013, 01:51 PM   #25
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I don't think falling is the best way to learn...

No one is saying its the best way to learn . by staying in your comfort zone is very slow learning curve .Best way to learn is ride with more experienced riders /friends ..and push your self past the comfort zone that little bit each time .Or a dirt riders course ..?
Why are the kids who start riding at early age so experienced at early teens ?
simply because they very little fear ...they constantly push there limits.
My opinion is dont buy an expensive bike to learn on ..Very simple .
Really ..Definitely not a good way to learn
a] Always stay in a comfort zone for fear of damaging it.
[ harley rider on dirt ]
Was your first car a top of the range /expensive car ?
The odds are simple
[ IF YOU RIDE BIKES OFTEN ..AT SOME POINT IT IS INEVITABLE YOU WILL HAVE SOME TYPE OF ACCIDENT.]

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Old 12-15-2013, 08:08 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by SteelJM1 View Post
And why the fact that its illegal on the road is stupid, but I digress. Didn't get seriously hurt, just sore.

Also, i DONT have video of me killing a jumping cholla about half an hour earlier. That pain was more acute, but shorter lived.

Here's the view from the other angle

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZojxA6XzmzI
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