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Old 11-13-2013, 01:56 PM   #16
csisfun
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I did this trip on a 50cc Honda Jazz (Metropolitan, in America). It took me 32-days to-and-fro from Toronto to St. John's, N.L, and back via Halifax, N.S.

It was certainly trying some times, especially when it rained, and when it was cold, and, on a 50cc, slow.

I'd say most of the East Coast is amenable to riding because there are interesting side roads, but if you decide to go to Newfoundland, I'd recommend not taking a small or slow scooter, because the Trans-Canada Highway in Newfoundland is very, very, very long, boring and brutal.

Nova Scotia is the place to be. I enjoyed myself the most in Nova Scotia, especially the Cabot Trail!

It was a trip to remember.
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Old 11-13-2013, 02:05 PM   #17
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I wouldn't say so - I've done toronto to bc on a ural, done France in a sidecar (though that might not be epic for total distance in a trip it still was a blast). I do 800-1000km scooter and ural trips regularly - but I do find for longer trips (due to work and other commitments) I need to schedule things well ahead of time.

Plus it is an interesting winter activity to go over what the next years trip will be.

Not all of us can "just go" - but I do get to do some trips and some experiences I enjoy. maybe not circumnavigating the globe, but I've doney fair share of miles, met some truly unique people along the way - and I plan to both enjoy planning trips and do them as well.


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Old 11-13-2013, 02:09 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by csisfun View Post



I did this trip on a 50cc Honda Jazz (Metropolitan, in America). It took me 32-days to-and-fro from Toronto to St. John's, N.L, and back via Halifax, N.S.

It was certainly trying some times, especially when it rained, and when it was cold, and, on a 50cc, slow.

I'd say most of the East Coast is amenable to riding because there are interesting side roads, but if you decide to go to Newfoundland, I'd recommend not taking a small or slow scooter, because the Trans-Canada Highway in Newfoundland is very, very, very long, boring and brutal.

Nova Scotia is the place to be. I enjoyed myself the most in Nova Scotia, especially the Cabot Trail!

It was a trip to remember.
Nice! I've done an 800km rally on a 50cc and by the end I think I had to just about have it surgically removed from my ass, so I definitely admire the fortitude needed to do that much distance on a jazz.
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Old 11-13-2013, 03:18 PM   #19
JerryH
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Prepare well, and have a rescue planned. That has always been my main concern on long trips. What if the bike breaks down (like a blown engine) and you can't fix it on the road? How do you get it back home?

Hard to imagine going very far on a Metropolitan. I had a 2007, and put about 10,000 miles on it. But it was all in southern AZ and NM. I tried to climb a not too steep hill with it, and it came to a dead stop. It had nearly twice the power of my 2 speed Puch moped (actual pedal moped0 which never had any problem climbing anything I pointed it at.
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Old 11-13-2013, 05:54 PM   #20
csisfun
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Originally Posted by bvardi View Post
Nice! I've done an 800km rally on a 50cc and by the end I think I had to just about have it surgically removed from my ass, so I definitely admire the fortitude needed to do that much distance on a jazz.
I noticed that the more days you ride, the less "baboon ass" you get. I never felt rear-end fatigue after the first few days of looooong saddle hours.

That said, I have never done 800km in 21-hours. That is probably even tougher than anything I've done in one day throughout the trip.
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:37 PM   #21
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Prepare well, and have a rescue planned. That has always been my main concern on long trips. What if the bike breaks down (like a blown engine) and you can't fix it on the road? How do you get it back home?
CAA plus is a necessity for me... and has bailed me out several times - that will cover many tow situations in north America. I'll be loading down the sidecar with many spares for the bike as well - extra tubes, full set of cables, some spare bulbs, some gas. I've cleaned P series carbs on the side of the road many times, have replaced cables on the side of the road many times (I had a P200 a while back that went through clutch cables like candy) We have a shipping company we have used before, and in a pinch they'll pick up from a storage place. (We have left bikes with a storage company... gave them a bit of money to store the bike for a week, and then the shipping company can pick it up from there.) Will likely also pick up a spare CDI/coil unit just in case.

In a *REAL* pinch, the value of the Vespas is not particular high. I wouldn't want to leave the sidecar rig if it had an engine failure.... but then again the engine from the other bike can be transplanted into it if I had to just get it running. Not too much of a challenge doing an engine swap on a P series.

Early this year we did a trip that was supposed to be up to Quebec.... our Kymco scooter failed entering Ottawa (oddly enough, those things are usually tanks... turned out to be a fluke bad voltage regulator frying the battery.) So we replanned the holiday to be in Ottawa until it was fixed. (Still was a good trip.. though the Ural was a bit crowded with three of us on it :)

Since we'll likely go into the US... will probably buy some travel insurance just to be absolutely covered as well.

So yep... plan for the failures... because if you don't Murphy will guarantee they will happen :)
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:42 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csisfun View Post
I noticed that the more days you ride, the less "baboon ass" you get. I never felt rear-end fatigue after the first few days of looooong saddle hours.

That said, I have never done 800km in 21-hours. That is probably even tougher than anything I've done in one day throughout the trip.
Very true - your body tends to get used to it.

Actually the 21 hour day was pretty good up til hour 18 or so... when it turned cold, wet, foggy. That, combined with driving at night, on an underpowered moped, up hills and with lighting that was never quite adequate.... yep that got crappy really quick. Had to drag my wife into a coffee shop (she wanted to press on, she is a real trooper) and get warmed up.... we were getting a bit too close to the hypothermic line.

Our biggest trip (out west) never really got draining... best part of a sidecar rig is being able to swap out drivers (And just enjoy the scenery for a bit... and then enjoy the driving. Though I did notice it was "Your turn" as soon as the weather turned nasty and my wife wanted to be in the sidecar ;)
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Old 11-13-2013, 11:46 PM   #23
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Awesome trip, Ty for sharing. I hope to someday get my wife on a bike. She is slowly coming around to the idea.
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Old 11-14-2013, 01:36 PM   #24
JerryH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bvardi View Post
CAA plus is a necessity for me... and has bailed me out several times - that will cover many tow situations in north America. I'll be loading down the sidecar with many spares for the bike as well - extra tubes, full set of cables, some spare bulbs, some gas. I've cleaned P series carbs on the side of the road many times, have replaced cables on the side of the road many times (I had a P200 a while back that went through clutch cables like candy) We have a shipping company we have used before, and in a pinch they'll pick up from a storage place. (We have left bikes with a storage company... gave them a bit of money to store the bike for a week, and then the shipping company can pick it up from there.) Will likely also pick up a spare CDI/coil unit just in case.

In a *REAL* pinch, the value of the Vespas is not particular high. I wouldn't want to leave the sidecar rig if it had an engine failure.... but then again the engine from the other bike can be transplanted into it if I had to just get it running. Not too much of a challenge doing an engine swap on a P series.

Early this year we did a trip that was supposed to be up to Quebec.... our Kymco scooter failed entering Ottawa (oddly enough, those things are usually tanks... turned out to be a fluke bad voltage regulator frying the battery.) So we replanned the holiday to be in Ottawa until it was fixed. (Still was a good trip.. though the Ural was a bit crowded with three of us on it :)

Since we'll likely go into the US... will probably buy some travel insurance just to be absolutely covered as well.

So yep... plan for the failures... because if you don't Murphy will guarantee they will happen :)
I have a road service plan from Paragon Motor Club, which gives me 150 miles of free towing. It's by far the best I could find, most of them give you 25-35 miles. I've already used it once, when my '08 Yamaha broke down about 35 miles away.

I have found that by far the most common problem by far that will stop you on the spot is a flat tire. I don't depend on road service for those. No matter what kind of bike I'm riding, I have a way to fix flat tires. On a scooter that is not usually a problem. Newer scooters have tubeless tires that can be plugged, vintage Vespas have a spare tire, and all scooters have a centerstand, which gives you a way to get the wheel off. Many motorcycles have tube type tires and no centerstand, and no way to get the wheel off, which means you aren't going anywhere.

I find it amazing that so many members of this forum do not prepare for a flat tire, because "they've never had one" or it's "extremely unlikely" I have to wonder just how far and under what conditions these members have ridden. I've had dozens of flats over the past 4 decades. On a small scooter, which must often be ridden mostly on the shoulder in the U.S., where all the flat causing stuff is, a flat (or several) are practically guaranteed. With a sidecar, you just about double your chances of having a flat, because of the 2 rear wheels being some distance apart.
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Old 11-14-2013, 02:47 PM   #25
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Awesome trip, Ty for sharing. I hope to someday get my wife on a bike. She is slowly coming around to the idea.
I got my wife on a scooter in 1985, and felt like a fool. She didn't have the temperament for it, would chase drivers down and chastise them for rudeness. I thought getting her in traffic was my worst idea to date, and was relieved when she lost interest after a few years. I like her being able to walk.
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Old 11-14-2013, 04:44 PM   #26
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Check your CAA plan for reciprocity with AAA. I'm pretty sure the AAA Recreational Vehicle plan I have includes Canadian roadside as well as US. I know my car & motorcycle insurance includes coverage in both the US and Canada. I checked on that as part of the 2014 Scooter Cannonball planning since the only way to get to Hyder is through Stewart, Canada. I'd check on medical coverage on your insurance just in case as well.
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Old 11-14-2013, 08:33 PM   #27
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Really I have to say as I Canadian I rather Do BC , Alberta , Skip Saskatchewan , Ontario by cutting down to the usa . Ride the usa till you hit New Brunswick . Then head to Quebec . Maybe I full of it but it seem to me that the USA detour offers far more to see then you get by riding Saskatchewan , Ontario .

I would aggree with needing a something like CAA but in BC at least they re off the wall for pricing at 145 bucks. Best deal I found is ether Good Sam club at 80 bucks us. One RV and up to 2 other cars or bikes. Doesn't seem to much chose with canada based plans. With out a plan towing my scooter cost 140 bucks 2 years ago for 30 Miles.
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Old 11-15-2013, 06:28 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post

I have found that by far the most common problem by far that will stop you on the spot is a flat tire. I don't depend on road service for those. No matter what kind of bike I'm riding, I have a way to fix flat tires. On a scooter that is not usually a problem. Newer scooters have tubeless tires that can be plugged, vintage Vespas have a spare tire, and all scooters have a centerstand, which gives you a way to get the wheel off. Many motorcycles have tube type tires and no centerstand, and no way to get the wheel off, which means you aren't going anywhere.

I find it amazing that so many members of this forum do not prepare for a flat tire, because "they've never had one" or it's "extremely unlikely" I have to wonder just how far and under what conditions these members have ridden. I've had dozens of flats over the past 4 decades. On a small scooter, which must often be ridden mostly on the shoulder in the U.S., where all the flat causing stuff is, a flat (or several) are practically guaranteed. With a sidecar, you just about double your chances of having a flat, because of the 2 rear wheels being some distance apart.

Actually in my experience, it's more often than not going to be the pusher tire that will get the flat. (More weight, stress on it) At least the only flats have had on the Ural were both on the rear.

Fortunately the Vespas have a spare tire each... and it isn't hard to carry a couple extra tubes. Not to mention the split rims make it really easy to change tubes (no need for tire spoons, can pull rim off without taking hub off... etc etc) So tire changes will not be an issue. Good thing too, have no idea right now how fast this sidecar PX will go through rear tires (way faster than normal is certain... just just how fast is hard to judge.) In a pinch can rotate with the sidecar and spare to maximize wear.
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Old 11-15-2013, 06:31 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by fullmetalscooter View Post
Really I have to say as I Canadian I rather Do BC , Alberta , Skip Saskatchewan , Ontario by cutting down to the usa . Ride the usa till you hit New Brunswick . Then head to Quebec . Maybe I full of it but it seem to me that the USA detour offers far more to see then you get by riding Saskatchewan , Ontario .

I would aggree with needing a something like CAA but in BC at least they re off the wall for pricing at 145 bucks. Best deal I found is ether Good Sam club at 80 bucks us. One RV and up to 2 other cars or bikes. Doesn't seem to much chose with canada based plans. With out a plan towing my scooter cost 140 bucks 2 years ago for 30 Miles.
Actually I liked the prairies and Saskatchewan while doing the cross country trip on the Ural.... but we avoided the Trans Canada and went through the southern lesser highways. Better scenery by far.... found the town of Ogema which is a neat place (tourist train operation... museum.... friendliest people around. Stopped for a few minutes and next thing you know we had the Mayor of the place saying hi.) http://www.ogema.ca/
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Old 11-15-2013, 06:33 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by cdwise View Post
Check your CAA plan for reciprocity with AAA. I'm pretty sure the AAA Recreational Vehicle plan I have includes Canadian roadside as well as US. I know my car & motorcycle insurance includes coverage in both the US and Canada. I checked on that as part of the 2014 Scooter Cannonball planning since the only way to get to Hyder is through Stewart, Canada. I'd check on medical coverage on your insurance just in case as well.
CAA does have AAA reciprocity.... though it may be a case of getting reimbursed with motorcycles in some areas due to differences in coverage (at least according to the CAA FAQ.) Motorcycle insurance will be fine in the US. Medical coverage I actually have through benefits from work.. but might pick up some extra if I plan to spend several days in the US. Will see.
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